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    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] CVGS Volga German Genealogy Workshop
    2. Maggie_Hein genealogy_account
    3. Concordia University Libraries and The Friends of the Center for Volga German Studies are preparing another workshop to provide you with more resources to research and learn about your Volga German heritage! The workshop will be held on the campus of Concordia University on Saturday, November 2, 2019, 9:00am – 4:00pm. The Center will be open on Sunday, November 3, 2019, noon – 3pm for participants who wish to access the Center’s resources for their specific research. CVGS volunteers will be available for assistance during that time. Conference registration will be $70, which includes a continental breakfast, lunch and snacks. Proceeds from the conference will be used to defray costs of purchasing translations of census and church records, as well as other related publications. Maggie Hein will be presenting two sessions aimed at researching your genealogy. The first will focus on researching in the U.S. and Canada. The second will review the types of records that may be available from the Russian archives and how they may be obtained. Marilyn Schunke will explore how Facebook can be of assistance to you in your research. Jim Holstein will share information about the Denmark connection that many Volga Germans share. Steve Schreiber and Krista Reynolds will share tips with you on how to access the vast Concordia University/CVGS catalog system to get the most out of the many resources the CVGS has to offer. https://cvgs.cu-portland.edu/exhibits-events/resources-researching-your-volga-german-family

    10/12/2019 08:34:54
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 2018 Report for the Frank-Kolb Russia Database
    2. Maggie Hein - genealogy
    3. 2018 Report for the Frank-Kolb Russia Database, submitted by Maggie Hein We had around 75 requests during the year, which is similar to previous years. When we receive a request, our goal is to generate an ancestor report (in standard Ahnentafel format) that provides the requestor with a list of their ancestors back as far as we have data. We usually have enough information to provide a complete genealogy back to the First Settlers, and in many cases, we have researched the initial settler families back several generations prior to their emigration to Russia. The report includes footnotes for the sources used to generate the report so that the recipient is able to see where we obtained our data. Doris continues to do all of the maintenance of our collection of documentation and also continues to do all of the updates to our genealogy database. The main collections that were added to the database this year was the Frank 1834 Census (translated by my cousin Tatjana Hein and edited by me), and the heads of the households from the Frank 1887 Family List (translated by me). As information on Frank and Kolb people is gleaned from the Brunnental Communion Registers, that is added. Any new German Origin research is added, as are any record images that I am able to obtain that verifies research and translations done by others. We also try to add any new information that we learn from people who request research help. Our goal is to acquire images of original source documents whenever possible. We have had considerable success with this. There are many items that seem to have been lost, for example church records for Frank prior to 1839 haven’t been found, birth or death records for Kolb prior to 1873 haven’t been found, and we haven’t seen any evidence that the 1897 census for either village survived. The one item that seems to have gone missing, but definitely must have existed at some point because it is included in Einwanderung Vol. 1, is the first 81 families on the Frank First Settler’s List. To the extent that we have evidence that specific documents exist and can be acquired, we have acquired them. Collecting all of these documents results in what seems to be an endless supply of translating projects. I work on the Russian language church records for Frank occasionally when someone has a research request that can’t be completed without checking the original records. The most difficult project I currently have is the 1887 Frank Family List. The good news is that in addition to the information about the residents in 1887, the list contains added notations about events that occurred up through the early years of the 1900s. The added information includes birth, marriages, deaths, military service, and emigration. The bad news (from my perspective since I don’t actually read Russian) is that the added information is written by multiple different scribes, some with indecipherable penmanship. It is an amazing amount of information, but with 1,200 pages to get through, it will be a long term project. My other ongoing project is the Brunnental Communion Registers. A few years ago, the Center for Volga German Studies (CVGS) acquired copies of Volume 2 of the 1870-1884 Communion Register for Brunnental. Communion registers provide birth, marriage and death details, grouped by family, on all individuals living in the village during the time frame of the register. Initially, I started translating only the pages for people who had immigrated from Frank or Kolb. It won’t come as a surprise to anyone who has translated records that what seems initially to be a small manageable project gradually takes over all of your spare time. AHSGR expressed an interest in publishing the translation (and other translations done from CVGS-acquired records). Barry Heimbigner graciously agreed to edit my translation, and I am grateful for all of his corrections to my work. Jim Weibert assembled the work into the standard AHSGR format and prepared an index, and after many edits, it was finally published in early 2018. People continued to move to Brunnetal from a wide variety of other villages in the decades after the initial settlement, and where they came from, and when they moved, is documented in the register. While all of this work was happening on Volume 2, I was finally able to get the images for Volume 1. The archive had initially been hesitant to allow copying of the book because of the poor condition of the pages (edges and corners of pages are curled, and in some cases torn off.) I’ve been working on translating Volume 1, with the intent that it will also be published by AHSGR. As I did with the previous volume, I share each translated page with Sherie Stahl and with the VC of the settler’s original village to get feedback on how the information fits in with the data they already have. The mystery of the 1860-1869 Brunnental register was also solved during 2018. I had received conflicting information about whether this book actually existed. AHSGR was able to determine through one of their contacts that it did exist, and I donated the money to AHSGR to cover the acquisition cost. The images are unfortunately not good quality and it will be difficult to translate this volume. The families in the 1860-1869 book are arranged in the same order as the families in the 1870-1884 book, so I prepared an index that crossed references the two books in the hopes that this would help with the translation process. As the Brunnental project evolved, I decided it would be a good idea to have the original images of the Resettlement Lists. When the daughter colonies were established in 1857, lists were made of the families in each mother colony who were relocating to each daughter colony. These lists are organized by mother colony, so in order to construct a “First Settler’s List” for each daughter colony, you have to locate all of the separate resettlement lists for the mother colonies. Many of these records are in the Samara Archives collection on Family Search. If you have looked at those microfilms, you know that the Revision Lists and the Resettlement Lists are not indexed, and really are not organized in any way that enables you to find anything quickly. There is a listing of the Revision Lists and matching film numbers on the CVGS web site, but you still have to scroll through the film until you find what you are looking for. Jeremy Landt mentioned in his VC report that he was working on an index of those films. I was glad to hear that because I think it will save everyone a lot of time if there is an index available. I continue to research the German Origins of Volga settlers. This was a good year with many interesting new finds and mysteries solved. My main focus is on settlers in Frank, Kolb, Walter and Hussenbach, and this year included some work on Norka and Yagodnaya Polyana settlers, and a few other villages. If I have a good hint about where a settler in another village may have come from, I will look at those. What do I mean by “good hint”? If the only information you have is the place name given in the “Einwanderung in das Wolgagebiet, 1764-1767” books, that isn’t always a good hint. For example, I was recently researching these four families, stated to be from these four places according to the Einwanderung books: Braun (Walter) from "Deckerbergheim", Doell (Walter) from "Höhenbergheim", Rehn (Kolb) from "Gebershein", and Arndt (Kolb) from "Heckeberg". In fact, all four families can be found in the parish records of Bergheim (formerly Heckenbergheim). Caution must be exercised when using the place names in the Einwanderung books and you should not assume that a place name given in a published translation or on a web site is the “real” place. Parish records and Familienbücher should be consulted to verify any location. We still have settlers in Frank and Kolb whose origins locations remain undocumented. Occasionally, someone will ask me about one of the families that has not been found yet, so I wanted to come up with a way to keep track of the status of German Origin research that has not been completed, to provide more information about research that has been completed, and to make that publicly available to anyone who was interested in it. I’ve seen examples from other researchers who used Trello Boards to track and display family history information, so I decided to give that a try. It is a work in process, and like every other genealogy project that I pick up, it is taking much longer than I anticipated. It is a public board, and you do not need a Trello account to view it: https://trello.com/b/cNmHrNFf/work-in-process-german-origins-village-of-fran k-russia I continue to provide content for the CVGS Facebook page. If I locate new German Origin information, after sharing it with the VC for that Volga village, I post it on the CVGS Page. The number of followers of the CVGS Page has grown from 2,624 at the beginning of 2018 to 2,949 at the end of 2018. I also continue to maintain the Frank-Kolb Russia Database Facebook Page. The number of followers of that page has grown from 1,255 at the beginning of 2018 to 1,387 at the end of 2018. I also set up a linked Facebook group so that Frank and Kolb descendants can communicate with each other. It is a closed group and membership is limited to people who have a family connection to Frank or Kolb. Doris and I both attended The Friends of the Center for Volga German Studies workshop, “Resources for Learning about your Volga German Heritage” in November. There was a day of presentations on Saturday and an afternoon of genealogy research assistance on Sunday. I gave a presentation called “Volga German Research: Documenting your ancestor’s lives in America and Canada”. This presentation is based on a short guidebook that I put together to assist people who are just starting out with Volga German genealogy research. I find that frequently people who want to trace their ancestors back to Russia have not researched all of the source material here in America, and don’t have enough information to successfully connect to their ancestors in Russian records. An updated version of the handout is here, and if you find it useful, you are welcome to share it: https://www.dropbox.com/s/q60gwrhcd264mpz/Basic_VG_research_12_18_18.pdf?dl= 0 I attended the 2018 AHSGR Convention in Hays, Kansas and gave a presentation on how to do German Origin research. The convention, as usual, was very, very, busy. The turnout at the convention was excellent this year. Between giving my presentation three times, attending meetings, trying to help various people with their genealogy research, and meeting with the Walter and Hussenbach VCs to go over our shared genealogy research, I was completely exhausted by the time I got home. I made my convention handouts and photos of this year’s display available to anyone who wasn’t able to attend the convention here: https://www.dropbox.com/sh/t4xex0w6950grmn/AABC0Rb48rHqZrRjEhPR8R85a?dl=0 While at the convention, I was made aware of the fact that Dr. Elena Ananyan had done a project about the Russian Military Draft, using the records of Kolb as an example. She wrote a 6-page description of the draft process, which discusses related issues such as the impact of draft policies on emigration. She mentions documents about people requesting permission to emigrate, and requesting permission to return to the village, in addition to discussing the documents that directly relate to the draft such as the granting of exemptions from service and casualty lists. The description is in the AHSGR Library along with copies of the Kolb draft lists for 1874-75, 1879-1900, 1902, and 1910-1911. We have many of the draft lists in our collection already (and a few more years than what is listed here) because they were part of the document collection that Doris had acquired ten years ago. There are also draft lists for years that we didn’t have, but unfortunately these are unreadable (too dark, too blurry, portions cut off). I have made several inquiries about getting better quality images, and about making Dr. Ananyan’s description more widely available, but have not received a response. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FrankKolbRussia/

    02/14/2019 06:06:24
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] Genealogy Workshop - Portland, OR - Nov 3-4 2018
    2. Maggie Hein - genealogy
    3. Concordia University Libraries and The Friends of the Center for Volga German Studies invite your participation in their workshop, "Resources for Learning about your Heritage". The workshop will be held on the campus of Concordia University on Saturday, November 3, 9:00am - 4:00pm. The Center will be open on Sunday, November 4, noon - 3pm for participants who wish to access the Center's resources for their specific research. CVGS volunteers will be available for assistance during that time. Conference registration is $70, which includes continental breakfast, lunch and snacks. Proceeds from the conference will be used to defray costs of purchasing translations of censuses, church and other records, and printing costs of research materials copied for Center patrons. The agenda for the conference includes presentations about beginning genealogical research, tracing your ancestors German origins to the Volga settlements, a personal example of one Volga German's genealogy mystery and information on using the Center's research tools. Speakers for this event include Maggie Hein, Herb Femling, Steve Schreiber and Roger Burbank. Kim Read, Dean of Libraries for Concordia University will welcome workshop participants. Online registration is now open. The number of participants will be limited to 50 so early sign-up is encouraged! Click on this link to access: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.cu-2Dportland.edu_cvgs-2Devent-2Dregistration&d=DwICAg&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=pItAO42J6bEZiQr2PlhjhX8MtOXBJRfx85pEz9suYGk&m=spOn6Gd8W-M-nKi-oLrLjozOnd_1vfoK1A2BCm_iVlM&s=T-wPKmhz_DGvbbNqnNv9N8JdRDI90HRDBUN-edP5bHg&e= If you have questions, please e-mail Valerie Miller at vmiller@cu-portland.edu We look forward to seeing you on November 3!! Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.facebook.com_FrankKolbRussia_&d=DwICAg&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=pItAO42J6bEZiQr2PlhjhX8MtOXBJRfx85pEz9suYGk&m=spOn6Gd8W-M-nKi-oLrLjozOnd_1vfoK1A2BCm_iVlM&s=TS7E1NPkdv9scz_Gtmu0xJj9zEflx6pDoFl_ZuuEJhM&e=

    09/19/2018 07:46:10
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 2018 Convention handlouts
    2. Maggie Hein - genealogy
    3. If you were not able to attend the 2018 AHSGR Convention, here are the handouts (DropBox Link): Confirmed German Origins for Frank Settlers (13 pages) Confirmed German Origins for Kolb Settlers (7 pages) Handout for my presentation about how to do German Origin research (2 pages) Flyer for CVGS Conference in November (1 page) I also included an image of the Google map that shows pins for the confirmed German Origin locations. https://www.dropbox.com/sh/t4xex0w6950grmn/AABC0Rb48rHqZrRjEhPR8R85a?dl=0 Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/FrankKolbRussia/

    08/04/2018 05:10:29
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] FW: Convention Early Bird Discount Ends 6/15
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. From: ahsgr@ahsgr.org [mailto:ahsgr@ahsgr.org] Sent: Friday, June 1, 2018 8:29 PM To: frank-VC-2@comcast.net Subject: Convention Early Bird Discount Ends 6/15 TWO WEEKS LEFT FOR THE EARLY BIRD DISCOUNT! If you’re planning to attend the AHSGR Convention in Hays, Kan., July 30-Aug. 2, it’s time to get registered. After June 15, registration increases from $100 for members/$120 for nonmembers to $125/$145. Registration information is available at ahsgr.org <https://www.ahsgr.org/link.asp?e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&job=3385153&ymlink=248273507&finalurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eahsgr%2Eorg%2Fdefault%2Easpx> . You can buy tickets through our online store, but make sure to watch your email for an information form after you register and fill that out; we need one form for each attendee. This is information regarding your ancestral villages and surnames, volunteering, and so on. There also are options to register for individual days of the convention if you can’t attend the whole thing. And there will be Kindertag, a youth heritage day, Aug. 1. More information about that is available at https://echshays.org/2018-2/kindertag/ <https://www.ahsgr.org/link.asp?e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&job=3385153&ymlink=248273507&finalurl=https%3A%2F%2Fechshays%2Eorg%2F2018%2D2%2Fkindertag%2F> . We’re very excited about the list of presentations planned. There still may be a few tweaks here and there, but here’s the current itinerary: Maggie Hein: Finding Your Ancestors’ German Origins Terry Needham: When I Was a Child – the Story Behind the Story Ulrich Merten: The German Russian Communities in the Age of Stalin’s ‘Great Terror’ Patty Nicholas (FHSU Ethnic Studies): A Roomful of History – The Volga Germans of Ellis and Rush Counties in Kansas Olga Litzenberger: Germans in Russia: History Milestone (Celebrating the 100th Anniversary of the Volga Germans’ Autonomy) Masterpieces of German Religious Architecture on the Volga Eric Schmaltz: Remembering a ‘Ravaged Century’: The German Colonies Caught in ‘The Storm’ of the Russian Revolution (July 31 keynote) Letters to Pauline (Schlegel) Lehl: Volga German Family Correspondence from Russia to Oklahoma, 1913-1937 Lee Macklin: DNA I: The Basis of Life DNA II: Analyzing Your DNA Results Peggy Goertzen: Ethnic Clothing for Mennonites and Other Germans from Russia Panel title: Mennonites in Russia after the Revolution Norma Pipkin: The Immigrant Woman Terry Batt: Dutch Hop: Music of the Volga Germans Michael Wanner: History of HFDR (Historical Research Association of Germans from Russia) Alex and Nancy Herzog: Lives of Ethnic Germans in Soviet Exile during and after WWII Tanja Nyberg: 80th Anniversary of Sandamokh Massacre Sisters Alice Ann Pfeifer, Mary Ann Schippers & Mary Elise Leiker: Religious Persecution of Germans in Siberia Michael Brown, Sue Nakaji, Peggy Goertzen and Christina Zahn panel discussion: Effects of Russian Revolution on German Colonies Brent Mai: Volga Famine Relief Karen Schutt: Book talk In addition to the presentations, of course, the convention will feature our AHSGR Bookstore, Research Room and Heritage Hall. There will be tours of historical and cultural sites in Hays; you have to register separately for those, and some have participant limits. We’ll also have music, food and lots of time for fellowship and networking with your fellow GRs. But you have to register first! Remember, June 15 is the early-bird deadline. We’re looking forward to seeing you all in Hays. If you wish to stop receiving email from us, you can simply remove yourself by visiting: http://www.ahsgr.org/members/EmailOptPreferences.aspx?id=34739805 <http://www.ahsgr.org/members/EmailOptPreferences.aspx?id=34739805&e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&h=91643e7024f82bb92788427110f68018e786afdf> &e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&h=91643e7024f82bb92788427110f68018e786afdf American Historical Society Of Germans From Russia 631 D Street Lincoln, NE 68502 An international organization dedicated to the discovery, collection, preservation and dissemination of information related to the history, cultural heritage and genealogy of Germanic Settlers in the Russian Empire and their descendants. <http://c.yourmembership.com/email_image.aspx?t=gcYwkDEfHvGxogawOIsAlzhscZNw7E5VnYY40eDUEvlpYHJyAYcOqiW%2bNUKcrIxN6tev%2frbvOZ8q6DRy5JoAg922GACUj5Asmyu%2fhzWXtS4%3d>

    06/01/2018 07:32:55
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] FW: 2018 AHSGR Convention Update
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. From: ahsgr@ahsgr.org [mailto:ahsgr@ahsgr.org] Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 5:39 PM To: frank-VC-2@comcast.net Subject: 2018 AHSGR Convention Update 2018 AHSGR Convention Update It’s beginning to look a lot like Convention around AHSGR headquarters – and for you, too, soon, we hope! The convention is July 29-Aug. 2 at Fort Hays State University in Hays, Kan., and we plan to have full registration information sent out and online very soon. In the meantime, here is the tentative schedule <http://www.ahsgr.org/link.asp?e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&job=3326367&ymlink=232405004&finalurl=https%3A%2F%2Fc%2Eymcdn%2Ecom%2Fsites%2Fahsgr%2Esite%2Dym%2Ecom%2Fresource%2Fresmgr%2Fconventionskedfinal%2Epdf> for events; it’s subject to change, but it is taking shape. We also have rates for three hotels in Hays, and they’re a bargain: * Baymont Inn and Suites, 3801 N. Vine St.; 785-625-8103; $69 plus tax * Days Inn, 3205 Vine Interstate 70, 785-628-8261; $74.69 plus tax * Holiday Inn Express and Suites, 4650 Roth Ave., 785-625-8000; $129 plus tax So, peruse the schedule, get those hotel reservations made and stand by for full registration information. Early-bird registration will be due June 15. Schedule <http://www.ahsgr.org/link.asp?e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&job=3326367&ymlink=232405004&finalurl=https%3A%2F%2Fc%2Eymcdn%2Ecom%2Fsites%2Fahsgr%2Esite%2Dym%2Ecom%2Fresource%2Fresmgr%2Fconventionskedfinal%2Epdf> <http://c.ymcdn.com/email_image.aspx?t=CscPUDuLT14aCp2SNd49eaDgA5LhJyxUgb2FpBiREKT0RHI3CdJ2LjgY8bMr7wT2SdzLpYQcmh9StHU9Jp7kw7vXvBlSDLjLH3fsqawWgb0%3d>

    04/21/2018 08:23:44
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] Frank-Kolb Russia Database - 2017 report
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. 2017 Report for the Frank-Kolb Russia Database, submitted by Maggie Hein We had around 80 inquiries during 2017, which is similar to previous years. The inquiries mainly come from people who contact me on Facebook, DNA matches, and referrals from other researchers. We do receive a few requests from people who have contacted us in the past, checking to see if we had any new information for them, but most of the requests we receive each year are from researchers that we had not previously had contact with. I’ve communicated with people in Russia, Germany, Argentina, Canada, and the United States. Because we have a large collection of Church and Census records, we are usually able to provide researchers with a report on their ancestral lines back to the initial founders in Frank and Kolb. If we have confirmed exact German Origin locations, we can usually provide several generations of research back into German parish records. The membership of our Frank-Kolb Facebook page has increased from 1,078 at the beginning of 2017 to 1,290 at the end of 2017. In early 2017, I began providing content for the Center for Volga German Studies Facebook Page. The membership of that page has increased from 2,201 at the beginning of 2017 to 2,650 at the end of 2017. Doris and I both attended the conference celebrating the 250th Anniversary of the founding of the colonies of Frank, Hussenbach, Kautz, Kolb, Norka, Yagodnaya Polyana, in Leavenworth, Washington, on 26-28 April 2017. This event was co-sponsored by The Center for Volga German Studies and the Council of Northwest Chapters of the American Historical Society of Germans from Russia (AHSGR). The event included several genealogy help sessions, and we were able to have one-on-one meetings with 12 people during the event. I gave two presentations at the conference, one on using Russian records for Volga German genealogy research, and one on how to do German Origin Research. I attended the annual California District Council German-Russian Heritage Festival on June 24, 2017 in the greater Sacramento area city of Roseville, CA. I gave a presentation on how to do German Origin research. I attended the inaugural conference of the International German Genealogy Partnership, July 28 to July 30, 2017 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. I wrote a short report on my impressions of this conference which I sent to Sherry Pawelko. To summarize, this was an extremely well organized, well run, and informative conference. The attendance (nearly 700) far exceeded the organizers’ expectations. There were a few members of the GR community in attendance. The North Star Chapter had a booth in the Vendor Hall, the SGGEE was there as both a vendor and a Partner Organization, and Carolyn Schott (Black Sea German Research Community) was a speaker. I would like to encourage our various GR Organizations to consider getting more involved in the International German Genealogy Partnership, and participating in the 2019 conference, which is scheduled for June 15-17, 2019 in Sacramento, California. This was a very successful year for German Origin research. The combination of the Decker Book, the Facius List extractions, the availability of the Kassel Archive collection on Archion, and the increased availability of digitized records on Family Search, has resulted in solving many long standing mysteries about exactly where specific families came from. I have personally documented the origin locations of more than 90 families over the last two years, and I know I am not the only person who is taking advantage of these new resources to confirm German origins. The newly available records have been especially helpful in confirming exact village origins of Huck and Norka families, who are frequently described only as being from “Isenburg” in the First Settler’s Lists. I have also found many families that settled in Messer and Kutter, a few families that settled in Walter, Reinwald, Stephan, Rothammel and Seewald, and a handful of families from other villages. We have been working on several projects related to Village of Frank Revision Lists and Family Lists. One of my cousins in Russia finished her translation of the 1834 Revision (Census) List. I have begun reviewing that translation and matching the entries to our database. The translation is quite detailed, and the translator made many helpful comments about items on the original documents that did not make sense or that disagreed with other available records. We have an ongoing project related to the 1857 Revision (Census) List. Doris and I received the translation of the 1857 Census in June. We took a quick look through it to see if it seemed to match up with information that we already have. Unfortunately, our quick review of the translation revealed a number of discrepancies. We began doing a line-by-line analysis, comparing the data in the translation to the data that we have from other sources. Since I have the images of the original 1857 documents, I was able to check what was in the translation against what is in the originals. I would place the problems into three categories: (1) problems with the data in the original documents, (2) variations in rendering Cyrillic spellings to German spellings, and (3) errors in the translation. The biggest problem is the data in the original documents. There are always challenges in converting a name written in Cyrillic into a “standard" German spelling. The scribe who filled out the original forms spelled many names in ways that are completely unlike the way that our German names are “normally” spelled in Russian documents. This is causing us to have to refer to the other Russian-language records and the German-language church records to determine what some of the surnames should be. In addition to being creative with surnames, this scribe did not seem to care whether he listed the first names correctly. This has resulted in a long list of discrepancies between what is on the census and what we know to be the correct names based on the church records and other census records. And, of course, any time that you are working with 160 year old handwritten documents, you are likely to make some errors. I have done enough translating myself to be well aware of how easy it is to make a mistake. It is always a good idea to have a second, or even third set of eyes review a translation of this size. I am about two-thirds of the way through the process of reviewing the 1857 translation. Our big acquisition for the year was the 1887 Frank Family List. We have known for years that one of the Russian Archives had a list that was described as an "1887 Family List". We were told that the pages were "too large to photocopy" and that was the end of the conversation. A couple of years ago, I requested samples of some Frank Census and Family List pages so that I could see what information was reported on the various lists. The image quality on the copies of the 1887 Family List was poor, but from the bits that I could decipher it looked like it could be valuable, so I inquired again if we could obtain a copy. This time the answer was yes, but because the original pages were so large, there would need to be several images made of each page. Finally, earlier this year, I was notified that the archive now had the equipment to do full page images of the oversized pages. I have received more than 1,200 images from this list which I believe is the entire list. Why would we need this list when we have so much Frank data already? Unfortunately, we have a block of birth records missing from 1887 through 1896. We also have a few missing pages here and there throughout the church records we do have. This list confirms information that we already have, and provides much additional information. The families are listed in order of household number. The household number on the "previous revision" is given. In this case, the "previous revision" would be the 1857 Census. The name of each male head of household is given along with his patronymic (father's name). His age on the 1857 census is given, his age as of Jan 1, 1887 is given, and his birth date is given. If there are any sons that are still part of his household, they are listed along with their ages as of Jan 1, 1887, and birth dates. Information about military service is noted. On the opposite page, the female family members are listed, along with their ages and birth dates. If individuals were born or died after 1887, the names and dates are noted. Based on what I have seen so far, the additional birth and death information continues until the first few years of the 1900s. I have translated the names and birth dates of the heads of household (over 650 households), and have begun working on translating the rest of the document. Because of the amount of data and the level of detailed information, this will be a long-term project. The document is in Russian, with some portions in very sloppy handwriting. I have also been working on translating our post-1891 (Russian language) church records. We have around 10-20 years (depending on the type of record) of birth, marriage, and death records in Russian. One of the members of my Facebook group (who was doing research at one of the Russian Archives) alerted me to the fact that the 1907-1913 birth records had recently been found there. I have now acquired those. I work on bits of this as I have time. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/FrankKolbRussia/

    01/10/2018 12:28:16
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] Latin
    2. Hi Maggie, Tanja Shell told me that you might know of someone that can read the latin script. This would be about 17 pages a Marriaegs from the colony of Schoenchen. Any ideas. I can read Latin, but this hand writing is not good for me. Kevin

    10/08/2017 02:22:16
    1. Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation
    2. Connie Mitchel
    3. Many thanks to you and Doris for all of your efforts on our behalf. Your work is greatly valued and very much appreciated. <3 On Fri, Aug 11, 2017 at 10:49 AM, Donald Walter <dwalter@cet.com> wrote: > Thank you for your hard work! You are appreciated. Don Walter > > -----Original Message----- > From: RUS-SARATOV-FRANK > [mailto:rus-saratov-frank-bounces+dwalter=cet.com@rootsweb.com] On Behalf > Of > Maggie Hein > Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2017 6:52 PM > To: rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com > Subject: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation > > I have received some inquiries about what is going on with the 1857 Frank > Census translation, so I want to give everyone an update. > > As many of you know, the Center for Volga German studies acquired this > census, along with some other documents, in late 2015. At that time, we > solicited contributions to help with the cost of acquiring these materials. > A few of you did contribute toward that effort. > > Doris and I received the translation of the 1857 Census in June. We took > a > quick look through it to see if it seemed to match up with information that > we already have. As you may already know, we have the 1834 and 1850 > censuses, the 1887 Family List, and most of the church records from 1839 > through 1910. Based on those materials, we have a pretty good idea of who > was living in Frank in 1857 and how their names were spelled on the > original > documents in both Russian and German. Unfortunately, our quick review of > the 1857 Census translation revealed a number of discrepancies. > > We began doing a line-by-line analysis, comparing the data in the > translation to the data that we have from other sources. Since I have the > images of the original 1857 documents, I was able to check what was in the > translation against what is in the originals. I would place the problems > into three categories: (1) problems with the data in the original > documents, > (2) variations in rendering Cyrillic spellings to German spellings, and (3) > errors in the translation. > > The biggest problem is the data in the original documents. For reasons > that > are unclear to me, the scribe who filled out the original forms spelled > many > names in ways that are completely unlike the way that our German names are > normally spelled in Russian. This is causing us to have to refer to the > other Russian-language records and the German-language church records to > determine what some of the surnames should be. In addition to being rather > creative with people's surnames, this scribe did not seem to care whether > he > listed the first names correctly. This has resulted in a long list of > discrepancies between what is on the census and what we know to be the > correct names based on the church records. > > Additionally, There are always challenges in converting a name written in > Cyrillic into the "correct" German spelling. Note that I put "correct" in > quotes because in there was not a "correct" way to spell any name in the > mid-1850s. We do have some generally accepted spellings that we use, and > the goal is to use a spelling that you would recognize as your family name > if you saw it on paper. The scribe who filled out the original forms is > making that somewhat difficult for us by choosing Russian spellings that > result in incorrect German names. > > And, of course, any time that you are working with 160 year old handwritten > documents in a language that is not your first language, you are likely to > make some errors. I have done enough translating myself to be well aware > of > how easy it is to make a mistake. It is always a good idea to have a > second, or even third set of eyes review a translation of this size. > > In summary, we are working on it. The goal is to render the original > document as faithfully as is reasonable under the circumstances, but also > to > recognize that the original document has issues that need to be addressed. > I don't want to release the translation until I am comfortable that we have > an explanation for all of the discrepancies. > > Thank you for your continued patience and support. > > > > Maggie Hein > > Village of Frank > > Visit us on Facebook - > https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 > > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without > the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >

    08/25/2017 10:13:00
    1. Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] RUS-SARATOV-FRANK Digest, Vol 12, Issue 8
    2. Dave Amen
    3. Thanks so much for all of your efforts here, Maggie! Best regards, Dave -----Original Message----- From: RUS-SARATOV-FRANK [mailto:rus-saratov-frank-bounces+dave.amen=gmail.com@rootsweb.com] On Behalf Of rus-saratov-frank-request@rootsweb.com Sent: Friday, August 25, 2017 1:00 AM To: rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com Subject: RUS-SARATOV-FRANK Digest, Vol 12, Issue 8 Send RUS-SARATOV-FRANK mailing list submissions to rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit http://lists2.rootsweb.ancestry.com/mailman/listinfo/rus-saratov-frank or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to rus-saratov-frank-request@rootsweb.com You can reach the person managing the list at rus-saratov-frank-owner@rootsweb.com When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than "Re: Contents of RUS-SARATOV-FRANK digest..." Today's Topics: 1. update on 1857 census translation (Rick Johnson) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: 1 Date: Thu, 24 Aug 2017 18:04:40 -0400 From: Rick Johnson <rjohn40787@aol.com> To: rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com Subject: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation Message-ID: <15e16469bed-c06-fd54@webjas-vaa180.srv.aolmail.net> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8 Maggie, my email address has changed. ?It is now "rjohnson98036@gmail.com". ?Can you change it, or advise how I can get it changed for this list? ? Thanks, Rick Johnson ? In a message dated 8/10/2017 7:19:16 PM Pacific Standard Time, frank-vc-2@comcast.net writes: ? I have received some inquiries about what is going on with the 1857 Frank Census translation, so I want to give everyone an update. As many of you know, the Center for Volga German studies acquired this census, along with some other documents, in late 2015. At that time, we solicited contributions to help with the cost of acquiring these materials. A few of you did contribute toward that effort. Doris and I received the translation of the 1857 Census in June. We took a quick look through it to see if it seemed to match up with information that we already have. As you may already know, we have the 1834 and 1850 censuses, the 1887 Family List, and most of the church records from 1839 through 1910. Based on those materials, we have a pretty good idea of who was living in Frank in 1857 and how their names were spelled on the original documents in both Russian and German. Unfortunately, our quick review of the 1857 Census translation revealed a number of discrepancies. We began doing a line-by-line analysis, comparing the data in the translation to the data that we have from other sources. Since I have the images of the original 1857 documents, I was able to check what was in the translation against what is in the originals. I would place the problems into three categories: (1) problems with the data in the original documents, (2) variations in rendering Cyrillic spellings to German spellings, and (3) errors in the translation. The biggest problem is the data in the original documents. For reasons that are unclear to me, the scribe who filled out the original forms spelled many names in ways that are completely unlike the way that our German names are normally spelled in Russian. This is causing us to have to refer to the other Russian-language records and the German-language church records to determine what some of the surnames should be. In addition to being rather creative with people's surnames, this scribe did not seem to care whether he listed the first names correctly. This has resulted in a long list of discrepancies between what is on the census and what we know to be the correct names based on the church records. Additionally, There are always challenges in converting a name written in Cyrillic into the "correct" German spelling. Note that I put "correct" in quotes because in there was not a "correct" way to spell any name in the mid-1850s. We do have some generally accepted spellings that we use, and the goal is to use a spelling that you would recognize as your family name if you saw it on paper. The scribe who filled out the original forms is making that somewhat difficult for us by choosing Russian spellings that result in incorrect German names. And, of course, any time that you are working with 160 year old handwritten documents in a language that is not your first language, you are likely to make some errors. I have done enough translating myself to be well aware of how easy it is to make a mistake. It is always a good idea to have a second, or even third set of eyes review a translation of this size. In summary, we are working on it. The goal is to render the original document as faithfully as is reasonable under the circumstances, but also to recognize that the original document has issues that need to be addressed. I don't want to release the translation until I am comfortable that we have an explanation for all of the discrepancies. Thank you for your continued patience and support. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ------------------------------ Subject: Digest Footer To contact the RUS-SARATOV-FRANK list administrator, send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-admin@rootsweb.com. To post a message to the RUS-SARATOV-FRANK mailing list, send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK@rootsweb.com. __________________________________________________________ To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word "unsubscribe" without the quotes in the subject and the body of the email with no additional text. ------------------------------ End of RUS-SARATOV-FRANK Digest, Vol 12, Issue 8 ************************************************

    08/25/2017 01:12:50
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation
    2. Rick Johnson
    3. Maggie, my email address has changed.  It is now "rjohnson98036@gmail.com".  Can you change it, or advise how I can get it changed for this list?   Thanks, Rick Johnson   In a message dated 8/10/2017 7:19:16 PM Pacific Standard Time, frank-vc-2@comcast.net writes:   I have received some inquiries about what is going on with the 1857 Frank Census translation, so I want to give everyone an update. As many of you know, the Center for Volga German studies acquired this census, along with some other documents, in late 2015. At that time, we solicited contributions to help with the cost of acquiring these materials. A few of you did contribute toward that effort. Doris and I received the translation of the 1857 Census in June. We took a quick look through it to see if it seemed to match up with information that we already have. As you may already know, we have the 1834 and 1850 censuses, the 1887 Family List, and most of the church records from 1839 through 1910. Based on those materials, we have a pretty good idea of who was living in Frank in 1857 and how their names were spelled on the original documents in both Russian and German. Unfortunately, our quick review of the 1857 Census translation revealed a number of discrepancies. We began doing a line-by-line analysis, comparing the data in the translation to the data that we have from other sources. Since I have the images of the original 1857 documents, I was able to check what was in the translation against what is in the originals. I would place the problems into three categories: (1) problems with the data in the original documents, (2) variations in rendering Cyrillic spellings to German spellings, and (3) errors in the translation. The biggest problem is the data in the original documents. For reasons that are unclear to me, the scribe who filled out the original forms spelled many names in ways that are completely unlike the way that our German names are normally spelled in Russian. This is causing us to have to refer to the other Russian-language records and the German-language church records to determine what some of the surnames should be. In addition to being rather creative with people's surnames, this scribe did not seem to care whether he listed the first names correctly. This has resulted in a long list of discrepancies between what is on the census and what we know to be the correct names based on the church records. Additionally, There are always challenges in converting a name written in Cyrillic into the "correct" German spelling. Note that I put "correct" in quotes because in there was not a "correct" way to spell any name in the mid-1850s. We do have some generally accepted spellings that we use, and the goal is to use a spelling that you would recognize as your family name if you saw it on paper. The scribe who filled out the original forms is making that somewhat difficult for us by choosing Russian spellings that result in incorrect German names. And, of course, any time that you are working with 160 year old handwritten documents in a language that is not your first language, you are likely to make some errors. I have done enough translating myself to be well aware of how easy it is to make a mistake. It is always a good idea to have a second, or even third set of eyes review a translation of this size. In summary, we are working on it. The goal is to render the original document as faithfully as is reasonable under the circumstances, but also to recognize that the original document has issues that need to be addressed. I don't want to release the translation until I am comfortable that we have an explanation for all of the discrepancies. Thank you for your continued patience and support. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    08/24/2017 12:04:40
    1. Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation
    2. Donald Walter
    3. Thank you for your hard work! You are appreciated. Don Walter -----Original Message----- From: RUS-SARATOV-FRANK [mailto:rus-saratov-frank-bounces+dwalter=cet.com@rootsweb.com] On Behalf Of Maggie Hein Sent: Thursday, August 10, 2017 6:52 PM To: rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com Subject: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation I have received some inquiries about what is going on with the 1857 Frank Census translation, so I want to give everyone an update. As many of you know, the Center for Volga German studies acquired this census, along with some other documents, in late 2015. At that time, we solicited contributions to help with the cost of acquiring these materials. A few of you did contribute toward that effort. Doris and I received the translation of the 1857 Census in June. We took a quick look through it to see if it seemed to match up with information that we already have. As you may already know, we have the 1834 and 1850 censuses, the 1887 Family List, and most of the church records from 1839 through 1910. Based on those materials, we have a pretty good idea of who was living in Frank in 1857 and how their names were spelled on the original documents in both Russian and German. Unfortunately, our quick review of the 1857 Census translation revealed a number of discrepancies. We began doing a line-by-line analysis, comparing the data in the translation to the data that we have from other sources. Since I have the images of the original 1857 documents, I was able to check what was in the translation against what is in the originals. I would place the problems into three categories: (1) problems with the data in the original documents, (2) variations in rendering Cyrillic spellings to German spellings, and (3) errors in the translation. The biggest problem is the data in the original documents. For reasons that are unclear to me, the scribe who filled out the original forms spelled many names in ways that are completely unlike the way that our German names are normally spelled in Russian. This is causing us to have to refer to the other Russian-language records and the German-language church records to determine what some of the surnames should be. In addition to being rather creative with people's surnames, this scribe did not seem to care whether he listed the first names correctly. This has resulted in a long list of discrepancies between what is on the census and what we know to be the correct names based on the church records. Additionally, There are always challenges in converting a name written in Cyrillic into the "correct" German spelling. Note that I put "correct" in quotes because in there was not a "correct" way to spell any name in the mid-1850s. We do have some generally accepted spellings that we use, and the goal is to use a spelling that you would recognize as your family name if you saw it on paper. The scribe who filled out the original forms is making that somewhat difficult for us by choosing Russian spellings that result in incorrect German names. And, of course, any time that you are working with 160 year old handwritten documents in a language that is not your first language, you are likely to make some errors. I have done enough translating myself to be well aware of how easy it is to make a mistake. It is always a good idea to have a second, or even third set of eyes review a translation of this size. In summary, we are working on it. The goal is to render the original document as faithfully as is reasonable under the circumstances, but also to recognize that the original document has issues that need to be addressed. I don't want to release the translation until I am comfortable that we have an explanation for all of the discrepancies. Thank you for your continued patience and support. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    08/11/2017 02:49:23
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] update on 1857 census translation
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. I have received some inquiries about what is going on with the 1857 Frank Census translation, so I want to give everyone an update. As many of you know, the Center for Volga German studies acquired this census, along with some other documents, in late 2015. At that time, we solicited contributions to help with the cost of acquiring these materials. A few of you did contribute toward that effort. Doris and I received the translation of the 1857 Census in June. We took a quick look through it to see if it seemed to match up with information that we already have. As you may already know, we have the 1834 and 1850 censuses, the 1887 Family List, and most of the church records from 1839 through 1910. Based on those materials, we have a pretty good idea of who was living in Frank in 1857 and how their names were spelled on the original documents in both Russian and German. Unfortunately, our quick review of the 1857 Census translation revealed a number of discrepancies. We began doing a line-by-line analysis, comparing the data in the translation to the data that we have from other sources. Since I have the images of the original 1857 documents, I was able to check what was in the translation against what is in the originals. I would place the problems into three categories: (1) problems with the data in the original documents, (2) variations in rendering Cyrillic spellings to German spellings, and (3) errors in the translation. The biggest problem is the data in the original documents. For reasons that are unclear to me, the scribe who filled out the original forms spelled many names in ways that are completely unlike the way that our German names are normally spelled in Russian. This is causing us to have to refer to the other Russian-language records and the German-language church records to determine what some of the surnames should be. In addition to being rather creative with people's surnames, this scribe did not seem to care whether he listed the first names correctly. This has resulted in a long list of discrepancies between what is on the census and what we know to be the correct names based on the church records. Additionally, There are always challenges in converting a name written in Cyrillic into the "correct" German spelling. Note that I put "correct" in quotes because in there was not a "correct" way to spell any name in the mid-1850s. We do have some generally accepted spellings that we use, and the goal is to use a spelling that you would recognize as your family name if you saw it on paper. The scribe who filled out the original forms is making that somewhat difficult for us by choosing Russian spellings that result in incorrect German names. And, of course, any time that you are working with 160 year old handwritten documents in a language that is not your first language, you are likely to make some errors. I have done enough translating myself to be well aware of how easy it is to make a mistake. It is always a good idea to have a second, or even third set of eyes review a translation of this size. In summary, we are working on it. The goal is to render the original document as faithfully as is reasonable under the circumstances, but also to recognize that the original document has issues that need to be addressed. I don't want to release the translation until I am comfortable that we have an explanation for all of the discrepancies. Thank you for your continued patience and support. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349

    08/10/2017 02:51:47
    1. Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] RUS-SARATOV-FRANK Digest, Vol 12, Issue 4
    2. Bauer
    3. Maggie, Wow, and thank you. Ralph Bauer -----Original Message----- From: rus-saratov-frank-request <rus-saratov-frank-request@rootsweb.com> To: rus-saratov-frank <rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com> Sent: Sun, May 28, 2017 7:00 pm Subject: RUS-SARATOV-FRANK Digest, Vol 12, Issue 4 Send RUS-SARATOV-FRANK mailing list submissions to rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit http://lists2.rootsweb.ancestry.com/mailman/listinfo/rus-saratov-frank or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to rus-saratov-frank-request@rootsweb.com You can reach the person managing the list at rus-saratov-frank-owner@rootsweb.com When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than "Re: Contents of RUS-SARATOV-FRANK digest..." Today's Topics: 1. 1887 Frank Family List (Maggie Hein) 2. Re: 1887 Frank Family List (Sherrie Stahl) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: 1 Date: Sun, 28 May 2017 15:55:51 -0500 From: "Maggie Hein" <frank-vc-2@comcast.net> To: <rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com> Subject: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 1887 Frank Family List Message-ID: <000a01d2d7f4$cb3361e0$619a25a0$@comcast.net> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" 1887 Frank Family List I recently obtained a portion of the 1887 Frank Family List. This is something that I have wanted to obtain for several years, but until recently, getting a copy of this list was not practical for reasons that I will explain. Background: We have known for years that one of the Russian Archives had a list that was described as an "1887 Family List". The list was quite large. We were told that the pages were "too large to photocopy" and that was the end of the conversation. A couple of years ago, I requested samples of some Frank Census and Family List pages so that I could see what information was reported on the various lists. The image quality on the copies of the 1887 Family List was not very good, but from the bits that I could decipher it looked like it could be valuable, so I inquired again if we could obtain a copy. This time the answer was yes, but because the original pages were so large, there would need to be several images made of each page. If you know anything about how much it costs to get records from Russia, you can imagine how much that would have cost, so I declined to make the acquisition. Finally, earlier this year, I was notified that the archive now had the equipment to do full page images of the oversized pages. So far, I have received a total of 551 images from this list. Right now I am waiting for another portion to be copied. I do not know if the entire list can be copied, but my goal is to get whatever portions are available. Why would we need this list when we have so much Frank data already? As many of you know, we have a good collection of church records for Frank. Unfortunately, we have a block of birth records missing from 1887 through 1896. We also have a few missing pages here and there throughout the records we do have. The fact that the list is described as an 1887 List is a bit misleading. This list doe start out as a list of everyone that was living in Frank in 1887. However, that's not all that it includes. Additional information is added to the list after 1887. Children who were born after that point are added, deaths after that point are noted. Military Service is noted. What information exactly is on the 1887 Family List? The original documents are in Russian. Most census and family lists follow a standard pattern - the data reported varies from list to list, but they all have some similarities. First, the families are listed in order of household number. Then the household number on the "previous revision" is given. In this case, the "previous revision" would be the 1857 Census. The name of each male head of household is given along with his patronymic (father's name). His age on the 1857 census is given, his age as of Jan 1, 1887 is given, and his birth date is given. If there are any sons that are still part of his household, they are listed along with their ages as of Jan 1, 1887, and birth dates. Information about military service is noted. On the next page, the female family members are listed, along with their ages and birth dates. If individuals were born or died after 1887, the names and dates are noted. Based on what I have seen so far as I have gone through the list, the added birth and death information continues until the first few years of the 1900s. I am in the process of translating the names and birth dates of the heads of household. The eventual goal would be to publish a translation. If I am able to obtain the remaining pages of the list, I am hoping that I will be able to use the list to fill in information that is missing from the church records. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 ------------------------------ Message: 2 Date: Sun, 28 May 2017 19:00:05 -0700 From: Sherrie Stahl <sherriestahl@gmail.com> To: rus-saratov-frank@rootsweb.com Subject: Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 1887 Frank Family List Message-ID: <6ED4F3B1-6112-4150-96AF-ED928A875895@gmail.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Awesome find Maggie!! Sherrie stahl sherriestahl@gmail.com > On May 28, 2017, at 1:55 PM, Maggie Hein <frank-vc-2@comcast.net> wrote: > > 1887 Frank Family List > > > > I recently obtained a portion of the 1887 Frank Family List. This is > something that I have wanted to obtain for several years, but until > recently, getting a copy of this list was not practical for reasons that I > will explain. > > > > Background: > > We have known for years that one of the Russian Archives had a list that was > described as an "1887 Family List". The list was quite large. We were > told that the pages were "too large to photocopy" and that was the end of > the conversation. A couple of years ago, I requested samples of some Frank > Census and Family List pages so that I could see what information was > reported on the various lists. The image quality on the copies of the 1887 > Family List was not very good, but from the bits that I could decipher it > looked like it could be valuable, so I inquired again if we could obtain a > copy. This time the answer was yes, but because the original pages were so > large, there would need to be several images made of each page. If you know > anything about how much it costs to get records from Russia, you can imagine > how much that would have cost, so I declined to make the acquisition. > Finally, earlier this year, I was notified that the archive now had the > equipment to do full page images of the oversized pages. So far, I have > received a total of 551 images from this list. Right now I am waiting for > another portion to be copied. I do not know if the entire list can be > copied, but my goal is to get whatever portions are available. > > > > Why would we need this list when we have so much Frank data already? > > As many of you know, we have a good collection of church records for Frank. > Unfortunately, we have a block of birth records missing from 1887 through > 1896. We also have a few missing pages here and there throughout the > records we do have. The fact that the list is described as an 1887 List is > a bit misleading. This list doe start out as a list of everyone that was > living in Frank in 1887. However, that's not all that it includes. > Additional information is added to the list after 1887. Children who were > born after that point are added, deaths after that point are noted. > Military Service is noted. > > > > What information exactly is on the 1887 Family List? > > The original documents are in Russian. Most census and family lists follow > a standard pattern - the data reported varies from list to list, but they > all have some similarities. First, the families are listed in order of > household number. Then the household number on the "previous revision" is > given. In this case, the "previous revision" would be the 1857 Census. The > name of each male head of household is given along with his patronymic > (father's name). His age on the 1857 census is given, his age as of Jan 1, > 1887 is given, and his birth date is given. If there are any sons that are > still part of his household, they are listed along with their ages as of Jan > 1, 1887, and birth dates. Information about military service is noted. On > the next page, the female family members are listed, along with their ages > and birth dates. If individuals were born or died after 1887, the names and > dates are noted. Based on what I have seen so far as I have gone through > the list, the added birth and death information continues until the first > few years of the 1900s. > > > > I am in the process of translating the names and birth dates of the heads of > household. The eventual goal would be to publish a translation. If I am > able to obtain the remaining pages of the list, I am hoping that I will be > able to use the list to fill in information that is missing from the church > records. > > > > Maggie Hein > > Village of Frank > > Visit us on Facebook - > https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 > > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ------------------------------ Subject: Digest Footer To contact the RUS-SARATOV-FRANK list administrator, send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-admin@rootsweb.com. To post a message to the RUS-SARATOV-FRANK mailing list, send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK@rootsweb.com. __________________________________________________________ To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word "unsubscribe" without the quotes in the subject and the body of the email with no additional text. ------------------------------ End of RUS-SARATOV-FRANK Digest, Vol 12, Issue 4 ************************************************

    05/29/2017 06:34:33
    1. Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 1887 Frank Family List
    2. Michael Hein
    3. Maggie, This is terrific news! I am continually impressed by you and your grit when it comes to your work. So many of use benefit from it. Thank you! Mike On Sun, May 28, 2017 at 3:55 PM, Maggie Hein <frank-vc-2@comcast.net> wrote: > 1887 Frank Family List > > > > I recently obtained a portion of the 1887 Frank Family List. This is > something that I have wanted to obtain for several years, but until > recently, getting a copy of this list was not practical for reasons that I > will explain. > > > > Background: > > We have known for years that one of the Russian Archives had a list that > was > described as an "1887 Family List". The list was quite large. We were > told that the pages were "too large to photocopy" and that was the end of > the conversation. A couple of years ago, I requested samples of some > Frank > Census and Family List pages so that I could see what information was > reported on the various lists. The image quality on the copies of the 1887 > Family List was not very good, but from the bits that I could decipher it > looked like it could be valuable, so I inquired again if we could obtain a > copy. This time the answer was yes, but because the original pages were so > large, there would need to be several images made of each page. If you > know > anything about how much it costs to get records from Russia, you can > imagine > how much that would have cost, so I declined to make the acquisition. > Finally, earlier this year, I was notified that the archive now had the > equipment to do full page images of the oversized pages. So far, I have > received a total of 551 images from this list. Right now I am waiting for > another portion to be copied. I do not know if the entire list can be > copied, but my goal is to get whatever portions are available. > > > > Why would we need this list when we have so much Frank data already? > > As many of you know, we have a good collection of church records for Frank. > Unfortunately, we have a block of birth records missing from 1887 through > 1896. We also have a few missing pages here and there throughout the > records we do have. The fact that the list is described as an 1887 List > is > a bit misleading. This list doe start out as a list of everyone that was > living in Frank in 1887. However, that's not all that it includes. > Additional information is added to the list after 1887. Children who were > born after that point are added, deaths after that point are noted. > Military Service is noted. > > > > What information exactly is on the 1887 Family List? > > The original documents are in Russian. Most census and family lists follow > a standard pattern - the data reported varies from list to list, but they > all have some similarities. First, the families are listed in order of > household number. Then the household number on the "previous revision" is > given. In this case, the "previous revision" would be the 1857 Census. > The > name of each male head of household is given along with his patronymic > (father's name). His age on the 1857 census is given, his age as of Jan 1, > 1887 is given, and his birth date is given. If there are any sons that are > still part of his household, they are listed along with their ages as of > Jan > 1, 1887, and birth dates. Information about military service is noted. > On > the next page, the female family members are listed, along with their ages > and birth dates. If individuals were born or died after 1887, the names > and > dates are noted. Based on what I have seen so far as I have gone through > the list, the added birth and death information continues until the first > few years of the 1900s. > > > > I am in the process of translating the names and birth dates of the heads > of > household. The eventual goal would be to publish a translation. If I am > able to obtain the remaining pages of the list, I am hoping that I will be > able to use the list to fill in information that is missing from the church > records. > > > > Maggie Hein > > Village of Frank > > Visit us on Facebook - > https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 > > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > -- Michael S. Hein, MD, MS, FACP Medical Director, VISN 23 Primary Care and Specialty Medicine Service Line Associate Chief of Medicine Nebraska-Western Iowa Health Care System, Department of Veteran Affairs 2201 North Broadwell Ave. Grand Island, Nebraska 68803

    05/29/2017 12:46:03
    1. Re: [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 1887 Frank Family List
    2. Sherrie Stahl
    3. Awesome find Maggie!! Sherrie stahl sherriestahl@gmail.com > On May 28, 2017, at 1:55 PM, Maggie Hein <frank-vc-2@comcast.net> wrote: > > 1887 Frank Family List > > > > I recently obtained a portion of the 1887 Frank Family List. This is > something that I have wanted to obtain for several years, but until > recently, getting a copy of this list was not practical for reasons that I > will explain. > > > > Background: > > We have known for years that one of the Russian Archives had a list that was > described as an "1887 Family List". The list was quite large. We were > told that the pages were "too large to photocopy" and that was the end of > the conversation. A couple of years ago, I requested samples of some Frank > Census and Family List pages so that I could see what information was > reported on the various lists. The image quality on the copies of the 1887 > Family List was not very good, but from the bits that I could decipher it > looked like it could be valuable, so I inquired again if we could obtain a > copy. This time the answer was yes, but because the original pages were so > large, there would need to be several images made of each page. If you know > anything about how much it costs to get records from Russia, you can imagine > how much that would have cost, so I declined to make the acquisition. > Finally, earlier this year, I was notified that the archive now had the > equipment to do full page images of the oversized pages. So far, I have > received a total of 551 images from this list. Right now I am waiting for > another portion to be copied. I do not know if the entire list can be > copied, but my goal is to get whatever portions are available. > > > > Why would we need this list when we have so much Frank data already? > > As many of you know, we have a good collection of church records for Frank. > Unfortunately, we have a block of birth records missing from 1887 through > 1896. We also have a few missing pages here and there throughout the > records we do have. The fact that the list is described as an 1887 List is > a bit misleading. This list doe start out as a list of everyone that was > living in Frank in 1887. However, that's not all that it includes. > Additional information is added to the list after 1887. Children who were > born after that point are added, deaths after that point are noted. > Military Service is noted. > > > > What information exactly is on the 1887 Family List? > > The original documents are in Russian. Most census and family lists follow > a standard pattern - the data reported varies from list to list, but they > all have some similarities. First, the families are listed in order of > household number. Then the household number on the "previous revision" is > given. In this case, the "previous revision" would be the 1857 Census. The > name of each male head of household is given along with his patronymic > (father's name). His age on the 1857 census is given, his age as of Jan 1, > 1887 is given, and his birth date is given. If there are any sons that are > still part of his household, they are listed along with their ages as of Jan > 1, 1887, and birth dates. Information about military service is noted. On > the next page, the female family members are listed, along with their ages > and birth dates. If individuals were born or died after 1887, the names and > dates are noted. Based on what I have seen so far as I have gone through > the list, the added birth and death information continues until the first > few years of the 1900s. > > > > I am in the process of translating the names and birth dates of the heads of > household. The eventual goal would be to publish a translation. If I am > able to obtain the remaining pages of the list, I am hoping that I will be > able to use the list to fill in information that is missing from the church > records. > > > > Maggie Hein > > Village of Frank > > Visit us on Facebook - > https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349 > > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to RUS-SARATOV-FRANK-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    05/28/2017 01:00:05
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 1887 Frank Family List
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. 1887 Frank Family List I recently obtained a portion of the 1887 Frank Family List. This is something that I have wanted to obtain for several years, but until recently, getting a copy of this list was not practical for reasons that I will explain. Background: We have known for years that one of the Russian Archives had a list that was described as an "1887 Family List". The list was quite large. We were told that the pages were "too large to photocopy" and that was the end of the conversation. A couple of years ago, I requested samples of some Frank Census and Family List pages so that I could see what information was reported on the various lists. The image quality on the copies of the 1887 Family List was not very good, but from the bits that I could decipher it looked like it could be valuable, so I inquired again if we could obtain a copy. This time the answer was yes, but because the original pages were so large, there would need to be several images made of each page. If you know anything about how much it costs to get records from Russia, you can imagine how much that would have cost, so I declined to make the acquisition. Finally, earlier this year, I was notified that the archive now had the equipment to do full page images of the oversized pages. So far, I have received a total of 551 images from this list. Right now I am waiting for another portion to be copied. I do not know if the entire list can be copied, but my goal is to get whatever portions are available. Why would we need this list when we have so much Frank data already? As many of you know, we have a good collection of church records for Frank. Unfortunately, we have a block of birth records missing from 1887 through 1896. We also have a few missing pages here and there throughout the records we do have. The fact that the list is described as an 1887 List is a bit misleading. This list doe start out as a list of everyone that was living in Frank in 1887. However, that's not all that it includes. Additional information is added to the list after 1887. Children who were born after that point are added, deaths after that point are noted. Military Service is noted. What information exactly is on the 1887 Family List? The original documents are in Russian. Most census and family lists follow a standard pattern - the data reported varies from list to list, but they all have some similarities. First, the families are listed in order of household number. Then the household number on the "previous revision" is given. In this case, the "previous revision" would be the 1857 Census. The name of each male head of household is given along with his patronymic (father's name). His age on the 1857 census is given, his age as of Jan 1, 1887 is given, and his birth date is given. If there are any sons that are still part of his household, they are listed along with their ages as of Jan 1, 1887, and birth dates. Information about military service is noted. On the next page, the female family members are listed, along with their ages and birth dates. If individuals were born or died after 1887, the names and dates are noted. Based on what I have seen so far as I have gone through the list, the added birth and death information continues until the first few years of the 1900s. I am in the process of translating the names and birth dates of the heads of household. The eventual goal would be to publish a translation. If I am able to obtain the remaining pages of the list, I am hoping that I will be able to use the list to fill in information that is missing from the church records. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349

    05/28/2017 09:55:51
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] AHSGR 2017 Milwaukee Convention
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. I am forwarding information about the 2017 AHSGR Convention. It is being held in Milwaukee this year. From: ahsgr@ahsgr.org [mailto:ahsgr@ahsgr.org] Sent: Friday, May 12, 2017 5:38 PM To: frank-VC-2@comcast.net Subject: AHSGR 2017 Milwaukee Convention Hello Everyone! You are invited to “Save the Date” for our 48th Annual Convention. This year it is in Milwaukee, WI. Dates are August 28-31 at the Milwaukee Hyatt Regency. Look for a hard copy in your mail (as well as attached PDF below) the week of May 15 – 22. See you in Milwaukee!! FinalInvitation.pdf <http://www.ahsgr.org/link.asp?e=frank-VC-2@comcast.net&job=2931996&ymlink=122097331&finalurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Eahsgr%2Eorg%2Fresource%2Fresmgr%2FFinalInvitation%2Epdf> American Historical Society Of Germans From Russia 631 D Street Lincoln, NE 68502 An international organization dedicated to the discovery, collection, preservation and dissemination of information related to the history, cultural heritage and genealogy of Germanic Settlers in the Russian Empire and their descendants. <http://c.ymcdn.com/email_image.aspx?t=f303k9t9atayw9CMuLzW7D5nN1Yj%2fEWXapLl5dUW%2fK2ZUdN9jJnYfG8bYVXXVPk%2bkBfqGN1DBVDoe8mB1JpKn2DsAaqsPlLYNyrU3iyLgXk%3d>

    05/12/2017 01:07:28
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] Volga Germans Gather in Leavenworth, Washington
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. To Frank Mailing List members: During 2017, we will be celebrating the 250th anniversary of the founding of Frank and other Volga German villages. In April, The Council of Northwest Chapters of AHSGR (CNC) and The Center for Volga German Studies (CVGS) are sponsoring a conference in Leavenworth, WA. I will be giving two presentations - one about resources available in Russia for Volga German genealogy research, and one about how to find German Origin villages. Other presenters include: Dr. Richard Scheuerman, Steve Schreiber, Jean Roth and Michael Frank. More details about this conference are provided below. From: Tanya Bushnell [mailto:tbushnell@cu-portland.edu] Sent: Wednesday, February 8, 2017 12:26 AM Subject: Volga Germans Gather in Leavenworth, Washington The Council of Northwest Chapters of AHSGR (CNC) and The Center for Volga German Studies (CVGS) are sponsoring a conference in Leavenworth, Washington on April 26 - 28. The program will celebrate the 250th anniversary of the founding of the Volga German colonies of Frank, Hussenbach, Kolb, Walter, Kautz, Norka and Yagodnaya Polyana. We will also honor the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation. Please join us and invite others who may be interested! When: Wednesday, April 26 - Friday, April 28, 2017 Where: Icicle Village Resort, 505 Highway 2, Leavenworth, WA 98826 What: The program will feature the Bergseite colonies of Frank, Hussenbach, Kautz, Kolb, Norka, Walter, and Yagodnaya Polyana Registration: $135 per person by March 24; and $165 per person from March 25 - April 21. The fee includes all programs, and banquet dinner on both Wednesday and Thursday. There will be a Silent Auction benefitting the CVGS. We are in the midst of procuring auction items. Please contact Jean Roth if you have an item to donate: jeanaroth@juno.com <mailto:jeanaroth@juno.com> or (206) 782-2629. A number of Village Coordinators will also be available to help with genealogy research. A sign-up sheet will be available at check-in on April 26. Additional program details will be posted on our website event page (links below) and Facebook pages, once finalized. Online conference registration by credit card is available here: cu-portland.edu/cvgs-event-registration <http://www.cu-portland.edu/cvgs-event-registration> *Note the early-bird discount for registrations received by March 24th!* The Icicle Village Resort is offering a special rate of just $109 (plus tax)on a limited number of rooms. Rate includes deluxe hot breakfast. Please call early to reserve your room, and be sure to quote the block rate "CNC / AHSGR" for the discount: (800) 961-0162 iciclevillage.com <http://www.iciclevillage.com> . Questions about the event? Please contact Valerie Miller at highlife56.vm@gmail.com <mailto:highlife56.vm@gmail.com> (email preferred) or (503) 314-5686. Tanya Bushnell Center for Volga German Studies Concordia University 2811 NE Holman Street Portland, Oregon 97211 Phone (503) 493-6369 cvgs.cu-portland.edu <http://cvgs.cu-portland.edu/> CVGS Facebook Page cu-portland.edu/give-cvgs <http://www.cu-portland.edu/give-cvgs>

    02/09/2017 01:33:41
    1. [RUS-SARATOV-FRANK] 2016 Frank-Kolb Russia Database report (a/k/a/ Village Coordinator Report)
    2. Maggie Hein
    3. Frank-Kolb Database 2016 Report, prepared by Maggie Hein, January 8, 2017. In memory of Katherina Bauer Hoff, 1928-2016 American visitors to the Volga area were frequently taken to the village of Frank by their tour guides, even if they did not have Frank ancestors. They went to visit Katherina “Katy” Bauer Hoff, a survivor of the 1941 deportation, and one of the few remaining elderly Germans living in the Frank Canton villages, who still remembered and told the story of our people. Katy was born in 1928, so she was old enough to remember clearly everything that happened during the deportation and its aftermath. She always welcomed visitors to her home, and was willing to spend hours telling her guests about her life and the lives of her fellow Volga Germans. Tanja Schell, Barry Heimbigner, and I wrote a remembrance of her life, accompanied by some photos that Tanja and Barry had taken, which we posted on the Frank-Kolb Facebook page. Our celebration of Katy’s life has now been viewed by more than 12,000 people. If you are on Facebook, you can view it here: https://www.facebook.com/permalink.php?story_fbid=10153921133925350&id=33615 6650349 Queries: We received nearly 80 inquiries this year, slightly less than last year. The largest source for new inquiries continues to be Facebook, followed by DNA testing. We receive inquiries from a variety of other sources – referrals from other people we have helped, people who find our contact info posted on the AHSGR web site, our own web sites, etc. I have mentioned in previous reports that I generally do not get responses when I contact new AHSGR members. I kept careful track this year in order to determine what the response rate actually was. I received e-mails from Diane notifying me of a 31 new AHSGR members who stated that they had Frank village ancestry. Of these, a few were people that I had already had contact with, or were cousins of other VCs who presumably already had their family data. I e-mailed the remaining 28 people. Of these, only 8 responded to me, 2 of those people actually had no connection to Frank, and 2 said they would get back to me and never did. So, the end result was that I only sent genealogy reports to 4 people referred from the AHSGR office. When someone requests help, we are almost always able to provide them with a report on their ancestors that connects most of their lines back to the initial settlers of the village, and in many cases several generations back in Germany. I produce a standard Ahnentafel Chart, with source footnotes for the data on the report so that the requestor can see exactly what our sources are. Sometimes I receive follow up questions about specific items on the report, but typically the Ahnentafel provides exactly what the requestor was looking for. Facebook: Facebook continues to be my primary method for finding new Frank and Kolb descendants. The membership in our Facebook page increases steadily each year. We had around 850 members at the end of last year, and we have over 1,080 right now. Anyone, whether they are a member of the page or not, is welcome to view, like or comment on the posts, and I frequently see likes, comments, and shares from people who are not members of the page. Because of this open sharing of information, the reach for some posts is occasionally double or triple the number of members of the page. I have enough material (photos of Russian villages, photos of German Origin locations, new research finds, articles and videos about Germans from Russia, articles about genealogy generally) that I normally post something new every other day. There are a multitude of Genealogy-related groups on Facebook, and I have found some that have been very helpful in providing new ideas and sources for research. It does take some work to moderate a Page or Group on Facebook. You have to pay attention to posts, messages, and comments, and you have to post information that people find interesting in order to keep the group engaged and on topic. If you don’t have a Facebook Page or Group for your village yet, I think that you would find it to be a worthwhile project. There are a number of VCs that have either Facebook Pages or Groups, and you can review those to see if it is something that would be useful to you. DNA Testing: I have found DNA testing to be an invaluable supplement to my traditional genealogy research. I did my first DNA test 10 years ago under the old National Geographic Genographic project. Direct-to-Consumer DNA testing for genealogy has come a long way since then. I have done testing at all three of the major testing companies (FTDNA, 23&Me, AncestryDNA) and Geno2.0. Each of the three major companies has its strengths and weaknesses, and which one you choose is highly dependent on what your goals are. I personally have found it incredibly helpful on my mom’s side, where we had a lack of solid facts on some lines. On my father’s side (my Volga German side), I have used it primarily as a way to locate Frank and Kolb descendants so that I can offer them help with their research. There is a steep learning curve in understanding how to use DNA results and all of the associated tools and web sites, but it is well worth it in my opinion. One of the interesting side effects of doing DNA testing is that you will eventually be contacted by someone who was adopted, or was conceived via sperm or egg donation. These cases can be very challenging, both from a research standpoint and from an emotional standpoint. If it is a close match (1st cousin or closer) you can quickly figure out who the birth parents are, but then you have the emotional difficulty of dealing with a family secret and all of the associated privacy issues. If it is a more distant match, you have the challenge of trying to help a person who has only a distant connection to you. I have helped several adoptees and donor-conceived individuals this year, and have enjoyed helping all of them connect with their birth families. Frank Church Records: We have an almost complete collection of church records from 1839 through the early 1900s. We have been unable to locate any earlier church records. There is an unfortunate gap in the birth records from about 1887-1896, which occasionally causes problems in making definite connections, but in many cases people can locate records here in the U.S. such as obituaries and death certificates that allow us to identify the parents of individuals born in that gap. The church records are in German until 1891, and then switch to Russian in 1892. The German records have all been translated. Doris continues to enter the translated church records into our database, and is getting close to the end of the translated records. I regularly interrupt this project by bombarding her with new ancestors that I have found in German church records, and family information provided by newly found cousins. We frequently find individuals from other villages getting married in Frank, and we have been sharing that information with other Village Coordinators. I am now attempting to translate the Russian-language marriages and learning how to read Russian names and dates in the process. Germany trip: I have visited Germany many times over the last 30 years. I made a trip in 2006 that was entirely focused on visiting origin locations for my ancestors from the village of Frank. We have documented so many more origin locations over the last decade, not just for Frank, but for Kolb and other Volga villages, that I thought it was time for another trip. My work schedule does not allow me much flexibility, but I was able to get away for a week in early June. Since I only had a week, there was a lot of driving and not much time for absorbing the local sites. I rented a car in Frankfurt and drove to Kusel, in Rhineland-Palatinate. I have ancestors on my mother’s (Catholic) side that came from the small towns around Kusel and Sankt Wendel (in Saarland). From there, I travelled to the area formerly known as Hanauerland. This is an area in present-day Baden, just east of the city of Kehl on the Rhine River. A dozen families that settled in Dietel (some descendants later moving to Frank) came from this area. I then drove to the Odenwald region. Numerous families that settled in Frank, Walter, Yagodnaya Polyana, and many other villages came from this area. >From there, I traveled to Büdingen, where Tanja Schell joined me. We drove around the area between Büdingen and Fulda, visiting numerous villages that were origin locations for people who went to Huck, Messer, Kolb, Norka, and Frank. I have posted many photos from this trip and previous trips on Facebook, along with summaries of which Volga settlers came from which German village. Our fellow researchers in Germany: While I was in the Odenwald area, I met with a German researcher named Andreas Uhrig. Andreas is among many historians and genealogists in Germany who have an interest in the Germans who immigrated to Russia. Reichelsheim and nearby Fränkisch-Crumbach were the origin locations for many Volga settlers. These immigrants to Russia have been identified in several publications such as the Mai/Marquart Origins and Destinations book and Ella Gieg’s numerous articles and books. Andreas was working on a presentation about the people who left this area to go to Russia, in commemoration of the 250th anniversary of their departure. He had identified a number of families who had left his area to travel to Russia, and was interested in tracing a few of those families first to Russia, and then later to the U.S. or Canada. I thought the Walter family of Walter village would be an interesting choice because of the large amount of detailed information available about that family and the fact that the Russian village was named after them. I put together a package of information including the Walter Surname Chart, the Walter CD, and examples of descendants of that family that had immigrated to the U.S. There were a few other families from other villages that we also researched. I want to thank the Walter and Yagodnaya Polyana village coordinators for helping with this project. German origins: We have made considerable progress this year on confirming origin locations (and researching as many generations back as possible in the German church records) for the settlers in both Frank and Kolb. A major reason for the progress this year has been the Archion Church Book Portal web site. We have a considerable number of immigrants to both Frank and Kolb who originated in the area of Hesse that is covered by the Landeskirchliches Archiv Kassel (Archive of the Evangelical Church of Kurhessen-Waldeck in Kassel). The records for our origin locations had not previously been available outside of Germany. They had not been filmed by Family Search, and professional researchers that we hired were able to extract the data, but not allowed to make photocopies of the pages. I have now been able to download images of the church book entries to support previous findings and to extend some lines that had not yet been researched. I have also been able to locate many new origin locations, which includes a number of localities in Rhineland-Palatinate and in Baden-Württemberg. We have some settlers that are believed to have come from Saxony, but at this point there is a lack of church records available for the locations in Saxony that I am interested in. Family Search continues to add to its indexes of German church books, and Ancestry has made several collections of German church books available to their subscribers. There is some overlap between what is on Ancestry and what is on Family Search, and since Family Search is free, that is probably the best place to start. I focused especially on Kolb settlers this year. I frequently come across families from other villages when I am researching Frank and Kolb people. Because of the difficulty and challenges inherent in documenting Volga German Origin locations, I always share the information that I find with the appropriate village coordinator. Over the last few years, I have come across families that settled in Huck, Messer, Norka, Moor, Warenburg, and Dobrinka and have shared that information with those Village Coordinators. We have distributed the German Origin information in various formats over the years. What we have confirmed for Frank and Kolb origins has been shared with both AHSGR and CVGS for posting on the German Origins sections of both web sites. Doris includes a German Origins section in the handout that she prepares for each AHSGR convention, and annual versions of this handout are available in the Frank Village File at AHSGR Headquarters. I have a spreadsheet that I created to track what we know about each First Settler family. And of course, I include the German ancestral information in the genealogy reports that I produce for people. I decided to reorganize my data this year and present the information in a different way. First, I created a map in Google Maps that has a pin for each confirmed Frank and Kolb origin location. You can view that map here: https://drive.google.com/open?id=1smOKsmkETiWQscJ20DtxY__A4wA&usp=sharing I have also written out brief narratives providing basic genealogical information about each of the Frank and Kolb First Settler families for which we have a confirmed origin location. You can view a .pdf file of that information here: Frank https://www.dropbox.com/s/lt7beqz8sy00iyy/Frank_German_Origins.pdf?dl=0 Kolb https://www.dropbox.com/s/jmzzg8km0w26tzr/Kolb_origins_summary.pdf?dl=0 Brunnental communion registers: Earlier this year, the Center for Volga German Studies was able to obtain a portion of the 1870-1884 Communion register for Brunnental. The Russian Archive was willing to copy only a portion of it because they feel that the first half of the book is too fragile to copy. Communion Registers include a considerable amount of data that is useful for genealogy. They list the name of the head of household, his wife, when and where each was born, and when they married. For children that are members of the household, they list names, birth dates, birth locations, marriage dates, and spouse names. Grandchildren’s birth dates and locations are also listed. Daughters are listed until they marry and move to their husband’s household, and sometimes there is a note about exactly which household they moved to. The multi-generational nature of the data makes it especially valuable for genealogy research, and the detail (exact birth dates and birth locations) provides more data than a census does. Brunnental is a daughter colony, populated with settlers predominantly from Walter, Frank, Kolb, Norka, Dietel and Huck, along with settlers from a number of other villages. When you include the birthplaces of the wives and children, the number of villages mentioned is in the dozens. Because so many of the Brunnental colonists came from Frank and Kolb, I volunteered to translate the Registers. I am entirely self-taught in reading Kurrentschrift, so it can be slow work, but it is excellent practice in reading handwritten German. As I complete each family group, I pass the translations along to the Brunnental VC, and to the VC of the origin colony, so that everyone can share in and benefit from the information. During 2016, translated pages have been sent to the VCs of Walter, Norka, Huck, Kutter, Dietel, Messer, Moor, Warenburg and Schilling. Frank and Kolb census records: In 2011, we obtained images of the 1857 Kolb census. Initially, our reason for needing images of the original census was to match up the household numbers in the 1857 census with the household numbers in the Russian Military Draft Lists. We were unable to use the AHSGR-published Kolb Census book (“Kolb: A German Colony on the Volga”) for this purpose because the AHGSR book does not provide the household numbers. As we started to work our way through the translation, we discovered that there were problems with the information in the AHSGR book. The maiden names of the women, which do appear in the original records, were completely omitted. In addition to the missing maiden names, some individuals were missing from the AHSGR book. In late 2011, I e-mailed several members of the AHSGR Board, notifying them of what we had learned about the Kolb census, requesting copies of the materials that were used to create the Kolb book, and offering to personally pay for a new translation of the materials. I followed up with another round of e-mails to AHSGR Board members in 2012. In my 2012 VC report, I mentioned the problems with the Kolb census, and I stated that the translation of the Frank church records had also alerted us to problems with the published Frank census records (“Frank: A German Colony on the Volga”). I stated that I didn’t know if the errors originated with the extraction of the data from the Russian records (apparently by Pleve), with the translation of the records, or with the formatting of the books for publication and I warned that anyone acquiring either the Frank or Kolb census books should be aware that they are incomplete and contain errors. In 2013 we obtained from the Russian Archives a list of heads-of-households in the 1834 and 1857 Frank censuses, and sample pages for two families. This confirmed that the women’s maiden names were reported on the original 1857 Frank Census (and were omitted from the AHSGR book) and that families were missing from the AHSGR book. I described the issues with the Frank census in my 2013 VC report. After these attempts to engage AHSGR in a discussion about re-translating and correcting the published materials, Doris and I decided to acquire the records ourselves in order to do our own new translations. Via a combination of acquisitions by the Center For Volga German Studies and personal acquisitions by Doris and myself, we now have the 1834 and 1857 Kolb censuses, and the 1834, 1850, and 1857 Frank censuses. As of this writing, both the 1834 and 1857 Kolb censuses and the 1850 Frank census has been translated. The 1834 and 1857 Frank census are in the process of being translated. AHSGR Convention Doris and I were both able to attend the convention this year. I gave a presentation on the types of records that are available in the Russian archives for Volga German genealogy research. As I have for the last several years, I moderated the VC meeting and the Area 1 Village meeting. When we were not attending presentations, we camped out at a table in the library, assisting researchers as much as we could with both general Volga German genealogy questions, and questions that were specific to Frank or Kolb. We had a relatively low turnout of Frank and Kolb attendees this year, but we still had plenty of people who wanted to ask us questions. I recently heard from another village coordinator that one of her cousins wanted to talk to us but gave up because of the long line. I enjoyed seeing some of our west coast cousins who normally do not attend conventions. I will not be attending the 2017 convention. Maggie Hein Village of Frank Visit us on Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/pages/Frank-Kolb-Russia-Database/336156650349

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