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    1. ([PABEAVER])List closing down 2 March 2020 and replacement List starting now
    2. W David Samuelsen
    3. Begining March 2nd, 2020 the Mailing Lists functionality on RootsWeb will be discontinued. Users will no longer be able to send outgoing emails or accept incoming emails.  Additionally, administration tools will no longer be available to list administrators and mailing lists will be put into an archival state.  Administrators may save the emails in their list prior to March 2nd. After that, mailing list archives will remain available and searchable on RootsWeb In light of above annoucement few days ago. New list set up to cover entire state as the start. https://groups.io/g/Pennsylvania-Gen You can see the description of the list Two ways to join scroll down to blue button "Join this Group" or Pennsylvania-Gen+subscribe@groups.io <mailto:Pennsylvania-Gen+subscribe@groups.io> David Samuelsen

    01/13/2020 12:04:12
    1. ([PABEAVER])An Invitation to Join a Great Group!
    2. Richard Berkheiser
    3. Hi everyone! By now I’m sure everyone has heard the sad news Rootsweb Mailing Lists will be disabled March 2, 2020. All lists will be archived for future researchers. Today I wanted to extend an Invitation to join our nearly 800 members strong Facebook group Pennsylvania Dutch Life. Debra Orner and I decided to welcome all of the list users to come over and join us! We discuss a little bit of everything. PA Dutch culture and heritage, area history, announcements of local events, and genealogical topics. Below is the link. https://www.facebook.com/groups/107084541429/?epa=SEARCH_BOX All we ask is your Facebook profile have a face picture. Hope to see you soon! Rick B PADL Group Owner and Admin

    01/12/2020 01:35:15
    1. ([PABEAVER])je(0):
    2. Mary Ann McCague
    3. http://nin.moico.info/ Life is divided into' the ho'rrible and the miserable. Prue Wydler

    07/16/2019 01:18:39
    1. ([PABEAVER])es: (2)
    2. DONNA MCCONNELL
    3. http://xnpa.eaeoha.info/ =========================== And how does gravity work? And if it were to cease suddenly, would certain restaurants still require a jacket? Celestine Bautista

    05/27/2019 09:39:14
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Joseph Kronk, Unit in Union Army
    2. Ann Hamilton
    3. If anyone answers Bob's questions, will you make it public? I'd be interested in the answers, also. Nancy -----Original Message----- From: Bob Todd via PABEAVER Sent: Sunday, April 21, 2019 7:19 PM To: pabeaver@rootsweb.com Cc: rkronk@gmail.com ; Bob Todd Subject: ([PABEAVER])Joseph Kronk, Unit in Union Army Members of the family are attempting to obtain a GI Tombstone for Joseph Kronk (1832-1885). He died before the 1890 US Census. We need the identity of the unit in which he served. He is reportedly buried in Grave !, Lot 24 of the Oak Grove Cemetery in Freedom, Beaver County, PA, per Cemetery Records. The only ID on this grave is GAR marker No. 168 which agrees with the Pennsylvania Veterans Burial Card dated 1936. Joseph's parents were Jacob and Mary Ann (Baker) Kronk. Note: Each of John Cronk/ Kronk's eight son's had a son named Joseph born c1825- c1840. They are difficult to differentiate. Joseph is not listed in William Irons' Beaver County Soldiers. I have not located him listed in Bates or the PA Card File. Any and all assistance will be greatly appreciated PS: Are there any records of the GAR extant? Is there a Chapter of the "Sons of the Union Veterans" in the beaver Co Area? Thank You, Bob Todd _______________________________________________ ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ==== PABEAVER@rootsweb.com To contact the List Administrator: Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    04/22/2019 04:59:50
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Joseph Kronk, Unit in Union Army
    2. Bob Todd
    3. Excuse me.  My typo.  The GAR Maker is No. 198. Bob Todd -----Original Message----- From: Bob Todd via PABEAVER <pabeaver@rootsweb.com> To: pabeaver <pabeaver@rootsweb.com> Cc: rkronk <rkronk@gmail.com>; Bob Todd <bobtodd1@verizon.net> Sent: Sun, Apr 21, 2019 8:19 pm Subject: ([PABEAVER])Joseph Kronk, Unit in Union Army Members of the family are attempting to obtain a GI Tombstone for Joseph Kronk (1832-1885).  He died before the 1890 US Census. We need the identity of the unit in which he served.   He is reportedly buried in Grave !,  Lot 24 of  the Oak Grove Cemetery in Freedom, Beaver County, PA, per Cemetery Records.    The only ID on this grave is GAR marker No. 168 which agrees with the Pennsylvania Veterans Burial  Card dated 1936.  Joseph's parents were Jacob and Mary Ann (Baker) Kronk.    Note: Each of John Cronk/ Kronk's  eight son's  had a son named Joseph born c1825- c1840.   They are difficult to differentiate.   Joseph is not listed in  William Irons' Beaver County Soldiers.  I have not located him listed in Bates or the PA Card File.  Any and all assistance will be greatly appreciated  PS:  Are there any records of the GAR extant?   Is there a Chapter of the "Sons of the Union Veterans" in the beaver Co Area? Thank You, Bob Todd _______________________________________________ ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ====       PABEAVER@rootsweb.com To contact the List Administrator: Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    04/22/2019 06:26:11
    1. ([PABEAVER])Joseph Kronk, Unit in Union Army
    2. Bob Todd
    3. Members of the family are attempting to obtain a GI Tombstone for Joseph Kronk (1832-1885).  He died before the 1890 US Census. We need the identity of the unit in which he served.   He is reportedly buried in Grave !,  Lot 24 of  the Oak Grove Cemetery in Freedom, Beaver County, PA, per Cemetery Records.    The only ID on this grave is GAR marker No. 168 which agrees with the Pennsylvania Veterans Burial  Card dated 1936.  Joseph's parents were Jacob and Mary Ann (Baker) Kronk.    Note: Each of John Cronk/ Kronk's  eight son's  had a son named Joseph born c1825- c1840.   They are difficult to differentiate.   Joseph is not listed in  William Irons' Beaver County Soldiers.  I have not located him listed in Bates or the PA Card File.  Any and all assistance will be greatly appreciated  PS:  Are there any records of the GAR extant?   Is there a Chapter of the "Sons of the Union Veterans" in the beaver Co Area? Thank You, Bob Todd

    04/21/2019 06:19:27
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Colona, PA
    2. Ann Hamilton
    3. https://www.usgs.gov/science-explorer-results?es=colonia+PA This is a great site, a bit gadgety for me, but you can put a year in and see what it looked like (I think!), or maybe it is just elevations. Anyway, you might want to poke around here. They also collect old names that no longer exist or that have changed. And you can submit ones that you know about. I submitted one for Beaver Co. once, Rayles Crossing, which was where an ancestor put he was born. Someone in the Rayles family said that his family had a store at a crossroads. Nancy > Where was Colona, PA located ? PA Death Certificates indicate Mary Baker > Kronk was born there? Thank you, Bob Todd.

    03/12/2019 02:27:15
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Colona, PA
    2. Bob Todd
    3. Sandra, Thank you.  This answers a great multitude of questions of where my father's ancestors, which go back to the 1780s,  lived south of the Ohio River.   Thanks again, Todd -----Original Message----- From: Sandra Brandon <sbrandon@sandale.us> To: pabeaver <pabeaver@rootsweb.com> Sent: Mon, Mar 11, 2019 9:45 pm Subject: ([PABEAVER])Re: Colona, PA Bob, I found this article at https://www.timesonline.com/6a98c7e6-4dc9-11e5-b2de-8bd198cc3886.html Hope it helps, Sandra By Jeffrey Snedden / For The Times Posted Sep 1, 2015 at 12:01 AM Updated Sep 1, 2015 at 4:15 AM As I was studying some very early Beaver County newspapers this past week, I came upon an interesting article from the Oct. 7, 1911, edition of The Daily Times -- a precursor to the Beaver County Times -- regarding the village of Colona. In the early part of the 20th century, Beaver County experienced an unprecedented population boom, which was a direct result of the many industrial mills and factories that located here. As established towns became overcrowded, many people chose to settle on the outskirts in what would become diverse suburbs of the larger communities. Some of these places grew large enough to become their own identifiable entity and would advertise what they had to offer in local newspapers. Such was the case with Colona, which is described in an article as a “very pretty little suburb of Monaca.” The village received its name from the Colonial Steel Co. mill and was the place where many of the employees made their homes. The main road was located on the flat bottom of the hill, similar to where Constitution Boulevard now runs. Colonial Avenue connected the business area to the residential blocks. One historical relic of Colona still lives on, the former Colona Passenger station of the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad. In March 1910, the railroad company was prepping its new tracks for the opening of the mammoth railroad bridge between Monaca and Beaver. On the Monaca end, the tracks previously made a large bend to the old station on that side of town, which is now home to the Beaver County Model Railroad and Historical Society. Once straightened, the new tracks would get a new passenger station, moved via horsepower from Colona to 14th Street and Pacific Avenue. The concrete foundation of the station was cut on March 22, 1910, and the move began. It took 30 days at 100 feet per day to move the station building from its location near the Colonial Steel mill to its present location. It would serve as the passenger station for Monaca from that point forward. Technically, the village was located in Moon Township until 1932 when it was annexed by Monaca and became the 4th and 5th wards of the borough. Some people who grew up in Monaca Heights will recall saying they lived in the “Monaca Annex,” which is what the area came to be called. The larger picture of Monaca’s history starts all the way back in the pre-Revolutionary War days, when a survey for the Colony of Pennsylvania listed the 330-acre tract of land “on the bend of the great Ohio River” as Smith Township, a distinction never heard again in any official records. In 1787, the land -- named “Appetite” -- was patented by the Commonwealth to a man named Ephraim Blaine in 1787 and would change hands numerous times until purchased by Frances Hilveti in 1813. Hilveti would build a large homestead consisting of two log houses, a sheep house and a stable near the base of the hillside. Unfortunately, Hilveti was not a wise businessman and found himself in debt to the tune of $3,012 to the Harmony Society and Frederick Rapp. Rapp, realizing Hilveti could never pay him, instructed the sheriff of Beaver County to sell Appetite at auction. On Aug. 30, 1821, the land was sold to the highest bidder at $1,960, which was Frederick Rapp. About this same time, Stephen Phillips began the first true flourishing business in the area. His boat building enterprise would construct 41 boats between 1822 and 1832. His affluence allowed him to buy the Appetite land from Rapp, giving Phillips ownership of all current land located in the downtown Monaca area, from river to hill. In 1832, a rogue group split away from the Harmony Society and floated down the river from Economy to Appetite, where they bought a chunk of land from Phillips. The New Philadelphia Society and its eccentric leader Count Maximillian DeLeon, would establish a new village. They named it Phillipsburg, in honor of Stephen Phillips, who must have made a great impression on the count. Despite a change in attitude toward procreation - which could have led to a bright future for the group - financial troubles and a legal battle with the Harmony Society combined to sink their endeavor within 18 months. DeLeon’s residence still sits on Atlantic Avenue, perhaps the only reminder of this short-lived era in Monaca history. The name Phillipsburg would stick for many decades, despite the shifting population. Although that was the official name, the post office was called Water Cure. Edward Acker was a doctor who believed in hydropathic methods of curing illness. He founded a hospital on the spot where the Monaca Water control center stands today, which lasted until the Civil War. Following the war, the buildings he had erected were sold to the Rev. William Taylor, who founded the Phillipsburg Soldiers Orphans School. Thiel College was established in Phillipsburg in 1866 by the Lutheran Church, which wanted to provide education to its younger constituents. The college moved to its current home in Greenville in 1871. Six years later, the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad laid its tracks through town and set in motion a rapid population spurt. Many of the families currently residing in Monaca can trace their roots in the borough back to this time period. The name Monaca was officially affixed to the town in March 1892, a decision built out of post office confusion over another Phillipsburg in eastern Pennsylvania. The first bridge over the Ohio River in this area came in 1895, which connected to Rochester and gave Monaca residents their first easy access to northern Beaver County. Monaca has undergone many changes since its early sheep-herding and boat-building days, and having just celebrated its 175th birthday, looks to continue moving forward into the future. That wraps us up for this week. If you have any subjects, questions, or comments for Histories & Mysteries, please send them to historiesandmysteries@yahoo.com. Jeffrey Snedden is a local writer, researcher and historian. If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for future Histories & Mysteries columns, contact Snedden at historiesandmysteries@yahoo.com. Each week, he will choose a few new topics and update past ones with readers’ notes and questions. Sign up for daily e-mail Wake up to the day’s top news, delivered to your inbox Sponsored Content New Rule in Olive Branch, MS By Comparisons.org Drivers With No Tickets In 3 Years Are In For A Big Surprise -----Original Message----- From: Bob Todd via PABEAVER [mailto:pabeaver@rootsweb.com] Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 8:29 PM To: pabeaver@rootsweb.com Cc: Bob Todd <bobtodd1@verizon.net> Subject: ([PABEAVER])Colona, PA Where was Colona, PA located ?  PA Death Certificates indicate Mary Baker Kronk was born there?  Thank you, Bob Todd. _______________________________________________ ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ====       PABEAVER@rootsweb.com To contact the List Administrator: Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community _______________________________________________ ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ====       PABEAVER@rootsweb.com To contact the List Administrator: Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    03/12/2019 06:50:46
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Colona, PA
    2. Sandra Brandon
    3. Bob, I found this article at https://www.timesonline.com/6a98c7e6-4dc9-11e5-b2de-8bd198cc3886.html Hope it helps, Sandra By Jeffrey Snedden / For The Times Posted Sep 1, 2015 at 12:01 AM Updated Sep 1, 2015 at 4:15 AM As I was studying some very early Beaver County newspapers this past week, I came upon an interesting article from the Oct. 7, 1911, edition of The Daily Times -- a precursor to the Beaver County Times -- regarding the village of Colona. In the early part of the 20th century, Beaver County experienced an unprecedented population boom, which was a direct result of the many industrial mills and factories that located here. As established towns became overcrowded, many people chose to settle on the outskirts in what would become diverse suburbs of the larger communities. Some of these places grew large enough to become their own identifiable entity and would advertise what they had to offer in local newspapers. Such was the case with Colona, which is described in an article as a “very pretty little suburb of Monaca.” The village received its name from the Colonial Steel Co. mill and was the place where many of the employees made their homes. The main road was located on the flat bottom of the hill, similar to where Constitution Boulevard now runs. Colonial Avenue connected the business area to the residential blocks. One historical relic of Colona still lives on, the former Colona Passenger station of the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad. In March 1910, the railroad company was prepping its new tracks for the opening of the mammoth railroad bridge between Monaca and Beaver. On the Monaca end, the tracks previously made a large bend to the old station on that side of town, which is now home to the Beaver County Model Railroad and Historical Society. Once straightened, the new tracks would get a new passenger station, moved via horsepower from Colona to 14th Street and Pacific Avenue. The concrete foundation of the station was cut on March 22, 1910, and the move began. It took 30 days at 100 feet per day to move the station building from its location near the Colonial Steel mill to its present location. It would serve as the passenger station for Monaca from that point forward. Technically, the village was located in Moon Township until 1932 when it was annexed by Monaca and became the 4th and 5th wards of the borough. Some people who grew up in Monaca Heights will recall saying they lived in the “Monaca Annex,” which is what the area came to be called. The larger picture of Monaca’s history starts all the way back in the pre-Revolutionary War days, when a survey for the Colony of Pennsylvania listed the 330-acre tract of land “on the bend of the great Ohio River” as Smith Township, a distinction never heard again in any official records. In 1787, the land -- named “Appetite” -- was patented by the Commonwealth to a man named Ephraim Blaine in 1787 and would change hands numerous times until purchased by Frances Hilveti in 1813. Hilveti would build a large homestead consisting of two log houses, a sheep house and a stable near the base of the hillside. Unfortunately, Hilveti was not a wise businessman and found himself in debt to the tune of $3,012 to the Harmony Society and Frederick Rapp. Rapp, realizing Hilveti could never pay him, instructed the sheriff of Beaver County to sell Appetite at auction. On Aug. 30, 1821, the land was sold to the highest bidder at $1,960, which was Frederick Rapp. About this same time, Stephen Phillips began the first true flourishing business in the area. His boat building enterprise would construct 41 boats between 1822 and 1832. His affluence allowed him to buy the Appetite land from Rapp, giving Phillips ownership of all current land located in the downtown Monaca area, from river to hill. In 1832, a rogue group split away from the Harmony Society and floated down the river from Economy to Appetite, where they bought a chunk of land from Phillips. The New Philadelphia Society and its eccentric leader Count Maximillian DeLeon, would establish a new village. They named it Phillipsburg, in honor of Stephen Phillips, who must have made a great impression on the count. Despite a change in attitude toward procreation - which could have led to a bright future for the group - financial troubles and a legal battle with the Harmony Society combined to sink their endeavor within 18 months. DeLeon’s residence still sits on Atlantic Avenue, perhaps the only reminder of this short-lived era in Monaca history. The name Phillipsburg would stick for many decades, despite the shifting population. Although that was the official name, the post office was called Water Cure. Edward Acker was a doctor who believed in hydropathic methods of curing illness. He founded a hospital on the spot where the Monaca Water control center stands today, which lasted until the Civil War. Following the war, the buildings he had erected were sold to the Rev. William Taylor, who founded the Phillipsburg Soldiers Orphans School. Thiel College was established in Phillipsburg in 1866 by the Lutheran Church, which wanted to provide education to its younger constituents. The college moved to its current home in Greenville in 1871. Six years later, the Pittsburgh & Lake Erie Railroad laid its tracks through town and set in motion a rapid population spurt. Many of the families currently residing in Monaca can trace their roots in the borough back to this time period. The name Monaca was officially affixed to the town in March 1892, a decision built out of post office confusion over another Phillipsburg in eastern Pennsylvania. The first bridge over the Ohio River in this area came in 1895, which connected to Rochester and gave Monaca residents their first easy access to northern Beaver County. Monaca has undergone many changes since its early sheep-herding and boat-building days, and having just celebrated its 175th birthday, looks to continue moving forward into the future. That wraps us up for this week. If you have any subjects, questions, or comments for Histories & Mysteries, please send them to historiesandmysteries@yahoo.com. Jeffrey Snedden is a local writer, researcher and historian. If you have any questions, comments or suggestions for future Histories & Mysteries columns, contact Snedden at historiesandmysteries@yahoo.com. Each week, he will choose a few new topics and update past ones with readers’ notes and questions. Sign up for daily e-mail Wake up to the day’s top news, delivered to your inbox Sponsored Content New Rule in Olive Branch, MS By Comparisons.org Drivers With No Tickets In 3 Years Are In For A Big Surprise -----Original Message----- From: Bob Todd via PABEAVER [mailto:pabeaver@rootsweb.com] Sent: Monday, March 11, 2019 8:29 PM To: pabeaver@rootsweb.com Cc: Bob Todd <bobtodd1@verizon.net> Subject: ([PABEAVER])Colona, PA Where was Colona, PA located ? PA Death Certificates indicate Mary Baker Kronk was born there? Thank you, Bob Todd. _______________________________________________ ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ==== PABEAVER@rootsweb.com To contact the List Administrator: Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    03/11/2019 07:44:54
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Colona, PA
    2. ALICE KERN
    3. It is an industrial site now, along the river next to Monaca. Alice > On March 11, 2019 at 9:28 PM Bob Todd via PABEAVER <pabeaver@rootsweb.com> wrote: > > > Where was Colona, PA located ?  PA Death Certificates indicate Mary Baker Kronk was born there?  Thank you, Bob Todd. > > _______________________________________________ > ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ==== > PABEAVER@rootsweb.com > > To contact the List Administrator: > Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    03/11/2019 07:42:01
    1. ([PABEAVER])Colona, PA
    2. Bob Todd
    3. Where was Colona, PA located ?  PA Death Certificates indicate Mary Baker Kronk was born there?  Thank you, Bob Todd.

    03/11/2019 07:28:55
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Location of Elkhorn Run
    2. Ann Hamilton
    3. https://www.google.com/maps/place/Elkhorn+Run+Rd,+Monaca,+PA+15061/@40.6710913,-80.266995,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x8834657765bcb9d7:0xdc82dd95c5a3abaf!8m2!3d40.6710913!4d-80.264801?hl=en sorry, meant to add that link -----Original Message----- From: Ann Hamilton Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2019 3:54 PM To: pabeaver@rootsweb.com Subject: Re: ([PABEAVER])Location of Elkhorn Run Bob, when I put it in google maps it offered me a choice of Center Township; and also Elkhorn Run Road, Monaca, Pennsylvania, which seemed like the same place, only it highlighted the road, too Nancy

    03/02/2019 02:55:19
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Location of Elkhorn Run
    2. Ann Hamilton
    3. Bob, when I put it in google maps it offered me a choice of Center Township; and also Elkhorn Run Road, Monaca, Pennsylvania, which seemed like the same place, only it highlighted the road, too Nancy -----Original Message----- From: Bob Todd Sent: Saturday, March 2, 2019 2:23 PM To: pabeaver@rootsweb.com Cc: bobtodd1@verizon.net Subject: ([PABEAVER])Location of Elkhorn Run In 1798, John Cronk/Kronk purchased a tract of land on Elkhorn Run in Moon Twp, Allegheny Co, PA.. What township in Beaver Co is Elkhorn Run situated in today? Thank you, Bob Todd _______________________________________________

    03/02/2019 02:54:23
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Location of Elkhorn Run
    2. Linda Holley
    3. Google says it is in Center Township but maybe someone local may know something different. Linda > On Mar 2, 2019, at 3:23 PM, Bob Todd <bobtodd1@verizon.net> wrote: > > In 1798, John Cronk/Kronk purchased a tract of land on Elkhorn Run in Moon Twp, Allegheny Co, PA.. What township in Beaver Co is Elkhorn Run situated in today? Thank you, Bob Todd > > _______________________________________________ > ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ==== > PABEAVER@rootsweb.com > > To contact the List Administrator: > Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/pabeaver@rootsweb.com > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    03/02/2019 02:15:40
    1. ([PABEAVER])Location of Elkhorn Run
    2. Bob Todd
    3. In 1798, John Cronk/Kronk purchased a tract of land on Elkhorn Run in Moon Twp, Allegheny Co, PA..  What township in Beaver Co  is Elkhorn Run situated in today?  Thank you,  Bob Todd

    03/02/2019 01:23:32
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Unknown Photo
    2. Sandra Brandon
    3. Bob, Attachments don't come through on the list mail. Only way for others to see this would be to post it on the Facebook page. Beaver County Genealogy and History Center has a Facebook page and I think you could post it there. Also, as a History Center you could donate an item to them. Sandra -----Original Message----- From: Bob Todd [mailto:bobtodd1@verizon.net] Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 12:49 PM To: paallegh-request@rootsweb.com; pabeaver@rootsweb.com Subject: ([PABEAVER])Unknown Photo I found this photo (copy attached) in my father's papers. No Names, dates, clues, etc. It could be of the Tod/Todd or Cronk/Kronk family of Beaver County. Can anyone recognize anyone or match it to existing old photos. Otherwise, has any suggestions of a place to donate it? Thank You, Bob Todd _______________________________________________ ==== PABEAVER Mailing List ==== PABEAVER@rootsweb.com To contact the List Administrator: Rick Berkheiser, PABEAVER-owner@rootsweb.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe and Archives https://mailinglists.rootsweb.com/listindexes/search/pabeaver Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    07/22/2018 08:01:15
    1. ([PABEAVER])Unknown Photo
    2. Bob Todd
    3. I found this photo (copy attached) in my father's papers. No Names, dates, clues, etc. It could be of the Tod/Todd or Cronk/Kronk family of Beaver County. Can anyone recognize anyone or match it to existing old photos. Otherwise, has any suggestions of a place to donate it? Thank You, Bob Todd

    07/15/2018 11:49:09
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: Surname shout out HAMILTON
    2. Ann Hamilton
    3. I am seeking connections to my HAMILTON and LYONS line. I would love to know if there were other Hamiltons there who could be relatives. Milton Hamilton and his wife Sophia Lyons were in Georgetown PA at least by 1845-47, because I find his oldest living child born there in that timeframe. The family later moved to MEIGS CO. OHIO -- I wonder if others had family from this area move there, and why? Nancy

    07/10/2018 09:41:57
    1. ([PABEAVER])Re: PABEAVER Digest, Vol 13, Issue 9
    2. diane
    3. That is my Charles Havis. The index spelled it wrong, but I have the death cert, and it's spelled right there. I like to have almost absolute proof before I believe I have found the next generation. I know that isn't always possible. What I am trying to find out is if the Charles Havice born 1840 to William Havice is also my Charles Havis born 1840. I only find Charles Havice before the Civil war and Charles Havis during and after the war. The Havice name was first Hebeisen, so I know the spelling can change. I just don't want to assume something.Thank you,Diane On ‎Saturday‎, ‎June‎ ‎23‎, ‎2018‎ ‎04‎:‎10‎:‎00‎ ‎AM‎ ‎EDT, <pabeaver-request@rootsweb.com> wrote: Send PABEAVER mailing list submissions to     pabeaver@rootsweb.com To subscribe or unsubscribe via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to     pabeaver-request@rootsweb.com You can reach the person managing the list at     pabeaver-owner@rootsweb.com When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than "Re: Contents of PABEAVER digest..." Today's Topics:   1. Re: Surname shout out Havice (ALICE KERN) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Date: Fri, 22 Jun 2018 06:39:32 -0400 (EDT) From: ALICE KERN <argkern@comcast.net> Subject: ([PABEAVER])Re: Surname shout out Havice To: pabeaver@rootsweb.com Message-ID: <283906388.159544.1529663973131@connect.xfinity.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=UTF-8 When did he die?  There is a death certificate which has been abstracted as Charles Hawis, retired officer. Alice > I am looking for information on Charles Havice/Hebeisen born in 1840 to William Havice. I am trying to find out if he is the same person as my Charles Havis, born 1840. My Charles served in the civil war and married Ella Dunlap. He was a policeman in Pittsburgh after the war. I know nothing about him before the war except that he was born in Beaver co., and his son died there.I have found nothing after the 1850 census on Charles Havice. There was a John Havice in the Pittsburgh city directories who later went by Havis. William's grandparents were Hebeisen, and several descendents changes it to Havice. > Thank you,Diane

    06/29/2018 08:46:03