RootsWeb.com Mailing Lists
Next Page
Total: 20/2587
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] Fwd: [KY-MEM] REMEMBERING THE WASPS
    2. Jim
    3. This narrative is indication  of the contributions that the women have suffered through their entire lives and as indicted were not appreciated for their support and actions.  To an extent that case is still evident today.  They work right along side of men in a lot of jobs but are not paid equally nor recognized equally.  Keep fighting Ladies your sacrifices is being recognized. Jim Tomes -----Original Message----- From: Sandi <sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> To: KENTUCKY-MEMORIES <KENTUCKY-MEMORIES@rootsweb.com> Sent: Mon, Oct 14, 2019 8:25 am Subject: [KY-MEM] REMEMBERING THE WASPS *REMEMBERING THE WASP’S* *“We are in a war and need to fight it with all our ability and every weapon possible. Women pilots, in this particular case, are a weapon waiting to be used.” Eleanor Roosevelt, September 1, 1942.* *Thus was the beginning of the WASPs – the Women Airforce Service Pilots. They served for over 30 years.* *Two ladies are credited with being the founders of the WASPS – Jacqueline Cochran and Nancy Harkness Love. Way before the armed forces even thought about using women pilots they appealed time and time again. Each time they were denied – what, women pilots in the military? But, by 1942 our country found itself in a global conflict and women were needed. Many women went to work in the plants, working as hard at the men, now soldiers, had done. Remember Rosie the Riveter? * *Now Germany, Great Britain and the Soviet Union were already utilizing women pilots – why not the United States?* *Enter Jacqueline. She had a pilot’s license, performed in air races and was the founder of a cosmetics company – a real go-getter. She requested, again, the government to develop a women’s corps … rejected. She was however assigned to lead the Women’s Flying Training Detachment to train other women to be pilots.* *Then Nancy Harkness Love. She also had her private pilot’s license, earned while still in high school. In 1940 she would be found ferrying military planes headed to France. She also approached the armed forces again for an all-women squadron. Denied. But she was hired by the Air Transport Command and organized the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron. This joined with Cochrane’s Women’s Flying Training Detachment and the WASPs were formed.* *What about the women who made up this new service? Most were already pilots and members of flying clubs. The Army required they be between the age of 21-35, had a high school education, held a commercial pilot’s license, had a 200-hp rating and a minimum of 500 flying hours. They were required to take “ground school” courses – 72 hours – learning navigation, military law, meteorology, rifle and pistol handling. * *Their assignments included ferrying planes, flying tow-targets for air-to-air and anti-aircraft artillery gunnery practice, engineering test flights, completing courier runs or teaching instrument flying to Army Air Force Cadets. This was a strenuous routine.* *For all their gallant service, WASPs were not considered service members. They didn’t receive any medical insurance. They were not as recognized as much as their male counterparts. But, in 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed Public Law 95-202 and they became officially recognized as war veterans.* *Cochran was the first woman to fly a bomber across the Atlantic. She won five **Harmon Trophies* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmon_Trophy>*. Sometimes called the "Speed Queen", at the time of her death, no other pilot held more speed, distance, or altitude records in aviation history than Cochran. Cochran attained the rank of Flight Captain (equivalent to a Squadron Leader in the RAF or a Major in the U.S. Air Force) in the ATA. On September 9, 1948, Cochran joined the **U.S. Air Force Reserve* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Air_Force_Reserve>* as a **lieutenant colonel* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lieutenant_Colonel_(United_States)>*. She was promoted to **colonel* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonel_(United_States)>* in 1969 and retired in 1970. She was, quite probably, the first woman pilot in the United States Air Force. During her career in the Air Force Reserve, she received three awards of the Distinguished Flying Cross for various achievements from 1947 to 1964. Cochran died on August 9, 1980 at her home in Indio, California. (Wikipedia citation).* *Nancy Harkness Love.**In 1948, after the creation of the **United States Air Force* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_Air_Force>*, she was designated with the rank of **lieutenant colonel* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lieutenant_colonel>* in the **U.S. Air Force Reserve* <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_Force_Reserve_Command>*. Love died of cancer at the age of 62 in 1976, so she did not live to see the WASPs being accorded military recognition three years later* *If you will do a search of these women’s names you will learn much more about them and there are photographs. Perhaps you even know of a woman who served with the WASPs.* *Sandi * ** -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Bookshelf:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php -- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus _______________________________________________ _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/kentucky-memories@rootsweb.com Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    10/14/2019 07:00:15
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] LIST GOING ON AN EXTENDED VACATION
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *LIST GOING ON AN EXTENDED VACATION* ** *Last week I asked for your input on the continuance of the Legends list. Out of 246 subscribers, 3 replied and one’s reply was rather curt. The other two were positive. It takes a considerable length of time to prepare but I have been willing to write as long as there were people who enjoyed the tales. I manage several other lists that seem to have good response.* ** *So, for now, I am letting the list go “on vacation.” You don’t need to unsubscribe if you don’t wish; you will just not be receiving my Tuesday posts.* ** *Thank you for being readers, I hope some of my stories have amused or challenged you!* ** *My best to you all – Sandi* ** -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    10/24/2017 02:01:57
    1. Re: [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] I AM REQUESTING YOUR OPINIONS!
    2. Dee Horn
    3. legrends, history, biographies, laws just about anything having yo do with genealogies o the peoples and places in Kentucky On October 17, 2017, at 6:14 AM, Sandi Gorin <sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> wrote: *I AM REQUESTING YOUR OPINIONS!* ** *I made a similar request on the Kentucky-Memories list yesterday …* ** *This list existed for quite some time before I took it over from a lady who either lost interest or ran out of legends.* ** *It is difficult to find stories – either of famous events or people, or scary stories, etc.* ** *I am now requesting your help!* ** *What would you like to see on this list? I am also at a point where I’m not sure what is of interest to you, the readers. Is there something in particular that you are interested in? Something you’d like me to try to find information on?* ** *If I don’t hear from you, I too will likely bring this list to a close. * ** *You may reply to the list, or you may write me privately at **sgorin@glasgow-ky.com* <mailto:sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> ** *Thanks!* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to KENTUCKY-LEGENDS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    10/18/2017 01:46:18
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] I AM REQUESTING YOUR OPINIONS!
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *I AM REQUESTING YOUR OPINIONS!* ** *I made a similar request on the Kentucky-Memories list yesterday …* ** *This list existed for quite some time before I took it over from a lady who either lost interest or ran out of legends.* ** *It is difficult to find stories – either of famous events or people, or scary stories, etc.* ** *I am now requesting your help!* ** *What would you like to see on this list? I am also at a point where I’m not sure what is of interest to you, the readers. Is there something in particular that you are interested in? Something you’d like me to try to find information on?* ** *If I don’t hear from you, I too will likely bring this list to a close. * ** *You may reply to the list, or you may write me privately at **sgorin@glasgow-ky.com* <mailto:sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> ** *Thanks!* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    10/17/2017 02:14:28
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] IS THERE A GHOST AUNT AT LIBERTY HALL?
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *IS THERE A GHOST AUNT AT LIBERTY HALL?* *In the theme of Halloween, another story has been oft told that centers in Frankfort, KY. Likely those of you who may live in the area have heard this story or variations of it. This story is courtesy of WKU Folklife Archives.* ** *Once upon a time, as many tales begin, there was a young lady who had been widowed by the death of her husband in the Civil War. She was forced to live alone in her large house somewhere next to the Kentucky River. Yes, she had servants to care for her but when she became quite ill, she sent for her dear aunt in West Virginia to come care for her.* ** *The aunt agreed and arranged to travel by stagecoach to Frankfort. But, alas, the aunt became ill herself and she was bed-ridden for several weeks in West Virginia. When she finally reached Frankfort – still ill herself – she found that her niece had died. Then, a mere three months later, the aunt herself died.* ** *The sad story should have ended there but from then until now, strange things seem to happen at that big old house along the Kentucky River. Neighbors keep reporting unusual events at that very house.* ** *The house, called Liberty Hall, seems to be the scene of candle lights going from one window to another. Why, sometimes neighbors report seeing a strange grayish mist floating through the halls. Was it just fog from the river?* ** *That was the beginning of stories being told about Liberty Hall. Some say that when the aunt died her soul remained in the house to take care of anyone who might stay there. She had grieved the fact that she did not reach her niece in time to care for her thus being for all time wandering around looking for someone she could care for.* ** *The aunt came to be known as the Grey Lady. The historical society has turned the house into a museum due to the beautiful garden in the back and the exquisite interior full of antiques. But, if you go there, perhaps you need to tour in the day time. If not, you might also see the aunt, the Grey Lady, floating from room to room holding a candle as she looks for those she can help.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    10/10/2017 02:20:19
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] THE SLOANS VALLEY TUNNEL GHOST LIGHTS
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *The Sloans Valley Tunnel Ghost Lights* ** *It’s time for another of those “Twilight Zone” stories.* ** *The scene of our story this week is the Sloans Valley Tunnel which is near the Cumberland River at the Western edge of the Daniel Boone National Forest. If you want to see these strange lights, it is suggested you go in late October or early November.* ** *Our tale goes back to October, 1890. If you look along the railroad line that runs through Pulaski County and into Sloans Valley, you will see a tunnel. In that year, two trains collided and it was called one of the worst train wrecks in the history of Kentucky. Seven people died in that wreck; dozens more were badly injured. One train was a freighter, the other a passenger train. The latter was about half way through the tunnel. This began those mysterious lights that have been seen around the tracks there ever since.* ** *Let’s take a closer look at the horrendous wreck. It was October 30^th and conditions were not good that night. Another wreck had, however, started this strange set of circumstances. This wreck was at Elihu Station near Somerset. In this collision, a freight train had run into another train that was leaving the station. One man was killed there and the wreck caused the tracks to be shut down for miles around. Freight Train No. 22 and a southbound passenger train No. 5 were involved in the wreck of which this story concerns.They had been delayed by the wreck at Elihu Station.* ** *No. 5 was one of two scheduled passenger trains that were headed south that evening. The two trains normally ran an hour apart. However, due to the wreck, they were both waiting at Somerset and were close to each other. A northbound freight train had been sidetracked south of the tunnel to allow the first passenger train to pass. Here began the problem. The engineer either forgot about the 2^nd passenger train or mistook the first freight train for No. 5. As soon as the other train had passed, No. 22 pulled back on the main line and started its journey north. It didn’t know that No. 5 was heading south on the same track.* ** *They soon found out however when the two trains collided head on in the Sloan Valley tunnel. The result was the explosion of the boilers on both engines which caused the tunnel to be filled with fire. With air being drawn into the tunnel it had the effect of bellows which poured even more oxygen onto the flames and soon the tunnel was a blast furnace.* ** *Thankfully, for the passengers, their train had not completely entered the tunnel and three of the sleeper cars at the rear of the train offered a way of escape. Passengers, likely screaming and pushing their way down the aisles, ran to the back of the train and escaped. What if that passenger train had been a little farther into the tunnel you ask? The death toll would have been much higher.* ** *It wasn’t too long after that horrible wreck that people started hearing reports of strange lights being seen along the tracks. Crying was heard coming from the tunnel it was said. Most of the lights seemed to be at the northern end of the tunnel. Those lights were described as bright – moving irregularly – swinging back and forth as if someone was running with a railroad lantern. But, if you run towards that light – it disappears! Sometimes, if the conditions are right, the lights and moaning can be heard coming from inside the tunnel.* ** *What causes those lights and the sounds of people crying? Could it be a memory forever burned into the walls of that tunnel and along the tracks? * -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    10/03/2017 01:33:24
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] OUR LEGENDARY HEROES - BRAVERY AGAINST THE NATIVE AMERICANS IN LINCOLN CO, KY
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *OUR LEGENDARY HEROES – BRAVERY AGAINST THE NATIVE AMERICANS IN LINCOLN COUNTY, KY.* ** These stories are recaps from Collins History of Kentucky Volume 1. I thought it might be interesting for the readers to know a little bit about the Indian raids and some of the people who were involved. These were among the heroes of our history. _Fall of 1799:_ Samuel Daviess, a resident of Bedford County VA, moved to KY and lived for a time at Whitley's Station in Lincoln. From there he moved to Gilmer's Lick, about 6-7 miles from the station. In Aug of 1782, he walked a few steps from his door and was surprised by an Indian's appearance between him and the door with tomahawk uplifted. He was not armed, ran around the house, ran in through the back door and found the house full of Indians. He then ran to a nearby cornfield, hid himself and the Indians finally left. He ran to the station of his brother, James Daviess - five miles away. He told them of his distress and told them that his wife and children had been captured by the Indians. A search was begun but the ground was so dry that they were unable to pick up the trail. Several miles into the quest, they heard a dog howling, the sound of which they followed. Two Indian spies saw the group coming and ran forward. The other Indians stayed with Daviess' family, one knocking down his oldest boy, about 11 years old. Mrs Daviess, seeing the upset of the Indians, saved herself and her suckling child by jumping into a sink hole. The entire family was saved by 9 o'clock that night, no lives lost but one of their boys had been scalped. He recovered but was disfigured for life. The boy had a chance 10 years later to get his revenge when the Indians returned into the neighborhood. He and a party of men went in pursuit of them, following them for days. The Indians discovered that they were being followed, went into ambush and killed the young Daviess lad and one other man. Mr. Daviess died one year later, it thought to be because of the distress of the events. _Fall of 1779_: William Montgomery, the elder, father-in-law of General Logan, and his family, and son-in-law, Joseph Russell and his family, came to KY from Virginia and settled at Logan's Fort. They stayed just a few months and didn't see any Indian danger. Thus the older Montgomery along with his sons, William, John, Thomas and Robert, son-in-law Russell banded together and built four log cabins on the head waters of Green River, about 12 miles southwest from Logan's fort. They settled in during the spring of 1799. Shortly after this time they were attacked by Indians. William Montgomery the elder, his wife and sons, daughters Jane and Betsey, along with two younger children, James and Flora lived in this cabin. Mrs Montgomery and the youngest daughter, Flora, were back at Logan's fort at the time. Thomas and Robert Montgomery were out spying. William Montgomery Jr and his wife with one child, later to be Judge Thomas Montgomery (son by a previous marriage) and a bound boy were in another cabin. There were also some slaves. This occurred in March of 1780. A band of Indians surrounded the cabins which were built close together in a square. Sometime between daylight and sunrise, William Montgomery the elder followed by a large Negro boy stepped out their door. They were immediately fired at and both killed. The boy's head fell back on the door-sill. Jane, the daughter, who later married Col. William Casey of Adair County, sprang to the door, pushed out the head, shut the door and called for her brother Thomas's gun. Betsey, her sister who was about 12 years old, climbed out of the cabin through the chimney and ran towards Pettit's station about 2 1/2 miles away. An Indian chased her for some distance but she was too fast for him and reached the station safely. Back at the cabins, the Indians delayed for a time in their attack. William Montgomery Jr heard the first gun shot and seized a large trough and with the assistance of the bound boy, grabbed his rifle, pointed it through a crevice in the door and fired twice. He killed one and wounded the other. John Montgomery who was in bed, was fired at through a crack in the mortar and was killed, his wife was made a prisoner of the Indians. John Russell escaped the cabin, leaving his wife and three children to the mercy of the Indians. This family, along with a mulatto girl were captured by the Indians. The Indian who had pursued Betsey returned, hid himself and yelled out. William Montgomery Jr killed him. General Logan, warned of the danger at the Montgomery settlement immediately sounded the alarm - his horn was well known. Twelve or fifteen armed men mounted and equipped for battle. The picked up the trail of the Indians, assisted by Mrs Russell, prisoner, who kept breaking twigs, dropping a handkerchief, etc. They soon found the mulatto girl who had been tomahawked, scalped and left for dead - she heard Gen Logan's familiar voice and revived, surviving. The Indians were made aware of Logan's approach by their own spies, but Logan surprised them and the Indians scattered. A daughter of Mrs. Russell who was about twelve heard Gen. Logan's voice and yelled out "There's uncle Ben!" The prisoners were rescued. _Spring of 1774_: Three young men, Davis, Caffree and McClure pursued a party of southern Indians who had stolen horses from Lincoln County. They reached what they thought was the Indian town of Chickamongo. They overtook three Indians going the same way and by way of sign language proceeded together - each leery of the other. The Indians walked on one side of the road, the white soldiers on the other. Caffree was a powerful man and it was decided that he would take out one of the Indians while Davis and McClure attacked the other two. He sprang on the nearest Indian, grasped his throat, hurled him to the ground and drew a cord from his pocket, attempting to tie him. Davis and McClure leveled their guns on the other Indians. McClure fired and killed his man, Davis' gun miss-fired. Cafree remained on the ground with his captured Indian while Davis and McClure took to the woods. Davis' Indian shot Caffree as he lay on the ground, killing him. Before he died, Davis ran to his aid, the Indian sprang to his feet and seized Caffree's rifle. McClure reloaded his gun and followed them into the forest. He never found Davis again. McClure, surrounded by dead bodies, retraced his steps still carrying his friend Davis' rifle. About a mile along he spied an Indian warrior approaching, riding a horse with a bell around his neck and dragging a boy on foot. McClure stepped out from hiding and extended his hand toward the Indian and made signs of peace. Other Indians arrived and McClure sat and smoked pipes with them. A bell was heard about 1/2 mile away and a second party of Indians approached. Suddenly McClure was bound and tied and carried off a prisoner with his feet tied under the horse's belly. When the Indian was involved with acting like a hero, McClure took his remaining gun and shot the head off the Indian. He took off on horseback and was pursued - falling off his horse several times - he was totally blind because of the dust. He finally dismounted, laid down on the ground face down, knowing that he would soon be killed. But no Indians came and he was able to reach home in safety. _1784 or 1785_: Near Crab Orchard, at the cabin of Mr. Woods. He had left his family one morning leaving his wife, a daughter not grown and a lame Negro man - riding off to a station near by. Mrs Woods went outside and some distance from the cabin, and suddenly saw approaching Indians. She screamed loudly in order to give the alarm and ran as fast as she could hoping to reach the cabin. However, one of the Indians forced his way into the house. The old Negro man grabbed him and they scuffled with the Indian falling down on top of the Negro. Mrs. Woods was busy trying to hold the door shut against the Indians so called to the young girl to take the axe from under the bed and to hit the Indian on the head with it. The little girl tried several times unsuccessfully. With a following blow, she killed him. The other Indians were still at the door attempting to get in. The Negro got up and told Mrs. Woods to let in another and one by one they would kill them in the same way. The noise reached the fort nearby and the charged to the cabin and fired on the Indians, killing another while the rest made their escape. -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    09/26/2017 01:41:47
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A FAMOUS CIVIL WAR SPY WHO WAS A LADY
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *A FAMOUS CIVIL WAR SPY WHO WAS A LADY* ** *I hope my readers will allow me another tale from my home county of Barren. This will be much shorter but quite interesting. The story took an unusual twist when I published it in our historical society quarterly, “Traces.”* ** *The story begins from a news article in the /Colorado Springs Gazette/ on October 22, 1905, page 15. * ** *“Mrs. Fanny McConnell, living at 1026 Washington street (Colorado Springs, CO), the first house built on the townsite of Colorado Springs by A. Z. Sheldon in 1860, was a once noted Rebel spy. Her maiden name was Fanny Wright and she was known to many leaders of the Rebel army as one of the most trusted secret agents of the Confederacy.* ** *“Mrs. McConnell’s home at that time was in Glasgow, Ky. At the close of the war she married J. McConnell, a prosperous farmer, and they settled down to quiet life near San Antonio, Texas. She is now 61 years of age and although time has left its wrinkled traces upon her face, it is evident that at one time she was a beautiful and attractive woman.* ** *“I was a spy under General Bragg,” she said yesterday to a Gazette reporter, “and I made more than one visit to General Rosecrans’ headquarters on one pretext or another when he invaded Kentucky and I carried information back to General Bragg. Men could not go anywhere in those days unless they were with an army, and so I, like many other southern women, rendered much service in bearing dispatches.* ** *“When Bragg concluded to send the raider, John H. Morgan, through Kentucky to destroy bridges and railroads in order to cut off Rosecrans’ supplies, it was I who carried him the message to report at General Bragg’s headquarters. After that I aided Morgan by bringing him quinine and percussion caps. These articles were sewed in a quilted skirt which I wore, and the dispatches were sewed between the soles of my shoes. I made trips across the Ohio River to Indiana towns where a confederate furnished the skirts filled with caps and quinine.* ** *“Often the skirts were loaded so heavily that they became a burden. I usually went on horseback across the country and had several narrow escapes from being captured by the Yankees.* ** *“I cultivated the acquaintance of Captain George Stone, a Union officer. He gallantly showed me around his camp. Then I told him I wanted to see what a fortification looked like and in his innocence he took me over to the breastworks and I mentally noted the weak places. That night I rode 40 miles to inform Magruder and at noon the next day his cavalry dashed in where I told them and captured the camp, as well as a large quantity of supplies without the loss of life.* ** *“When the Federals were in Glasgow, I was suspected on several occasions of being a spy. They had my hair searched for dispatches. One day I got so mad and had a barber cut in off and I threw it in a Union colonel’s face who chanced to be present. He laughed and seemed pleased to get it. This made me madder still and I took it away from him.* ** *“My duties led me to Shiloh and I shall never forget the horrors of that battle scene. The dead and dying lay in windows and the wounded were piteously begging for water. There were so many of them, and so few of us to attend their wants, that I took off a new pair of shoes and carried water in them from the creek to the poor fellows in both the blue and the gray who were only too glad to drink from anything.* ** *“After the emancipation proclamation many Union soldiers threw down their arms, saying that they would not fight to free the Negroes. Southwestern Kentucky was full of deserters from the Union army and we gave them paroles by the hundreds so they might safely return to their homes.* ** *“Mrs. McConnell knew Quantrell and says he was one of the bravest men the world ever saw, but he was cruel and wicked. “His grave is in Kentucky,” she added, “narrow enough, and deep enough to hold him until the judgment day.”* ** *Narcissus Frances Wright was born 25 March 1845 in Barren County, KY, daughter of Uberto Wright and Susannah Jane Smith. She married John Breckinridge McConnell 4 July 1865 in Glasgow, KY; died 28 Feb 1915 in Colorado Springs. They had nine children.* ** *But – this is not the end of the story. * ** *When the quarterly was received by our members, one, Margaret Wilson, thought she recognized the name of Narcissa Frances “Bonnie” Wright – known in the article as Fanny McConnell. She thought she was a distant kin to her husband. After a search on Ancestry.com, she found Fanny’s granddaughter, Barbara “Bobby” Dobbins Title in California. When Margaret shared the article, Bobby realized that she knew nothing about her grandmother’s interesting past. When we contacted Bobby, she graciously provided more family information. According to Bobby’s aunt, after the slaves of Frances’ father were freed, they chose to remain with the family. * ** *The McConnell family went to Texas and were in Limestone County, TX on the 1880 census. At some time the family moved to Colorado, then back to Texas and Fannie’s husband died around 1898. Fannie moved back to Colorado. * ** *The /Colorado Springs Gazette/ scanned the above article for Bobby which included a picture of her in her later years. Fannie died February 26, 1915 in Colorado Springs and is buried in the Evergreen Cemetery.* ** *Few people ever knew of her riding horseback during the Civil War with messages sewn in her skirts.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    09/19/2017 02:02:10
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A STUDY IN SCARLET - WHAT TO DO WITH THE BODY - CONCLUSION
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *A STUDY IN SCARLET – WHAT TO DO WITH THE BODY - CONCLUSION* ** *The previous news item continued – the editor of the paper was most anxious to cover this story; it meant more people would be buying the /Times!/* *//* *“Several crowds visited the jail yesterday afternoon to see the doomed man. Brown was dressed in his burial clothes and talked freely to all who would listen. All his talks were pretty much the same, but the one made to the crowd in which was his old father, Tom Brown, was particularly pathetic. Mr. Thos. Reynolds, the stenographer, took down his speech, and /THE TIMES/ prints it in full:* ** *“Friends. You perhaps, witness a scene which you never saw before- that of a man well and hearty with his death shroud on, waiting for the time (last line missing).* ** *“Then turning to his aged father, who sat near, he addressed him: ‘God bless you father, and may you give yourself to God. Had you have been a Christian and taught me the ways of life when I was a boy I might not have been here today. You have buried your wife and other loved ones, and you must soon follow me to the grave. I beseech you to prepare to meet your loved ones in Heaven.’“Then taking his father’s hand, he said: ‘Father, will you prepare to meet my mother in heaven?’ Mid sobs of suffocating grief, the old man made him the promise, and bade him goodbye. * ** *“Brown’s wife and children last Friday visited the scaffold on which he was hanged this morning. She seemed very anxious to see how it worked, and had Jailer Carter to spring the trap and explain it to her. She placed her little son on the scaffold to show him where his father was to be hanged, and remarked that she would not turn her hand to change the sentence. Mrs. Brown has all along shown that she still fears Brown would harm her if he got the chance.* ** *“Jailer Carter received a letter from Brown’s wife last week in regard to the disposal of the body of her husband after his death. She wrote that after due consideration, she had decided that, if none of Brown’s relatives were inclined to give his body burial, the Sheriff would have to attend to the interment, as she would have nothing to do with it. She asked Jailer Carter not to read the letter to her husband, and he did not. Accordingly, Brown’s relatives were notified of the state of affairs. His father, Tom Brown, will take the body to the New Salem cemetery and bury it this afternoon. It is said that the citizens of the New Salem country have protested against Brown being buried in their cemetery, but this report has not been substantiated.* ** *“Some time ago, Revs. J. W. Wheeler and J. P. Brooks made up a fund and bought a handsome Oxford Bible, which they presented to Brown to read during his confinement. Last week he wrote the following letter to his family on the flyleaf:* ** *“Glasgow, Barren Co. Ky., March 20, 1899 – Dear wife and sweet children. I desire to write a few lines in this good Book that when you may open this Book to read you may remember that these lines were written by the hand of your husband, the one who loves you and his precious children. If you only knew the love and desire of my heart to be present with you! It is hard to part with those whom we love so dear. May God’s tender mercy ever rest upon you and the dear children. I hope to meet you all in a better world than this. Freeman, be a good boy and be kind to your mother and be good to her; love your little sisters, and be kind to them. Tinie and Leila and Cora, be good children. Be kind to little brother and be good to our mother. Jesus loves good little children. You be good and love Him and He will give you a home in Heaven. Freeman, be good to your mother and see that she is taken fare of as long as she lives, if you outlive her. Ida, I give my little family into the hands of the Lord. Ida, be kind to our sweet babies. Good-bye. May God bless you all. R. L. Brown.* ** *“On another page Brown wrote the following: ‘Prove all things, hold fast to that which is good. Do right and live. Be kind to all. Papa loves his dear children – Freeman, Tinie, Tella, Cora and Ida.’* ** *“The Bible was delivered to his little boy yesterday. Brown also left the following note for his wife: ‘Ida. Plant a rose at the head and foot of my grave and a bunch of Bleeding-hearts on my grave, and when you see it remember that I say that represents my poor, bleeding heart for my sweet little family. I ever knew how much I loved you til you were taken away from me. Good-bye.’* ** *“The following letter was written by Brown last Wednesday: ‘Glasgow, March 30, 1899. Mr. Thomas Shader and wife: Kind friends, I wish to thank you both for your kindness and sympathy that you have shown me amidst my trials and heavy burdens which I had had to undergo. I feel that you both have been a comfort to me. I hope that (I) may one day meet you both in heaven. It is so hard to give up our loved ones. May God bless us all and save all in heaven is my prayer. Good-bye. Respectfully, R. L. Brown.’* ** *“Brown wrote the following card of thanks for publication: ‘Glasgow, April 1, 1899. Mr. F. C. Carter and family, Mr. J. W. Wheeler and Mr. Brooks and all those good Christian people who have been with me in my trouble and who have had sympathy for me. I offer my sincere thanks to you for all your love and kindness to me, and hope to meet you in a better world. R. L. Brown.’* ** *“Thus ends the last chapter of the story of the bloodiest tragedy that was ever enacted in Barren county. While the particulars of the crime for which Brown was hanged are still fresh in the minds of our readers of /THE TIMES/, a brief summary of the facts concerning his crimes and subsequent events is not out of order. (Repeat of the crime given).”* ** *The article ends with reference to the fact that this was the third hanging in Barren County this year – the first being Caleb Gaines, a negro accused of attempted rape, who was hanged to a tree in the courthouse yard by a mob on the night of June 15t6h; the second of John Franklin, on March 10^th and now Bob Brown.”* ** *Note: Alonzo McClellan was born in 1836; died 1898, buried at the New Salem Cemetery. His wife, Sarah E., was born in 1844; died in 1924, buried same.* ** *Thus ends a sad event and one of most detailed thanks to The Times.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    09/12/2017 01:41:07
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A STUDY IN SCARLET - LETTERS & ESCAPE ATTEMPT - PART 5
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *A STUDY IN SCARLET – LETTERS AND ESCAPE ATTEMPT - PART 5* ** *The headlines of the /Glasgow Times/ on April 3, 1899 surely caught the attention of their many readers:* ** *INTO ETERNITY* *BOB BROWN Pays the Penalty of Life for Life* *Scenes and incidents of the Last Great Tragedy* *Three Hangings Within a Year in Glasgow* ** *“Thirty four years and three months was the length of Robert L. Brown’s career on earth. Under a final decision of the Court of Appeals, rendered February 21, he was hanged by the neck until dead in the enclosure erected near the jail, this morning, for the willful murder of Alonzo McClellan, his father-in-law, on the night of November 10, last. The trap was sprung at 9:43 o’clock. At the expiration of twelve minutes and thirty seconds his pulse ceased to beat, Drs. H. W. Coombs, A. T. Botts and R. E. Garnett, the attending physicians, pronouncing him dead. The body remained hanging until 10:00 when it was cut down by Deputy Sheriff John Rousseau. An examination made after the body was cut down showed that the neck was broken in the fall.* ** *“Brown was probably killed instantly by the fall, as he struggled very little. Beyond a shrugging of shoulders and a slight tremor of the limbs, there was no outward sign of suffering.* ** *“The party with Brown in charge filed into the enclosure around the gallows at 9:40. Brown was in excellent spirits and mounted the scaffold with a steady step, and maintained a pleasant composure to the last. Sheriff Barlow pulled the lever which let him drop into eternity.* ** *“When the officers went into the cell of Brown, he embraced them all and wept for awhile, but in a few minutes his spirits were revived sufficiently to walk to the scaffold upon which he died.* ** *“Brown’s body was taken to the home of his aunt, Mrs. Rosa Rogers, in the New Salem neighborhood, where it remains until it is buried in the New Salem cemetery tomorrow morning. (NOTE: There is no record of his burial there, perhaps it is in an unmarked grave. Many local citizens did not want him buried there.)* ** *“Just before he left his cell he wrote the following letters:* ** *“Glasgow, Ky., April 3, 1899 – Dear wife: I seat myself to write you a few lines to let you know that I want you and my dear children to meet me in heaven. I feel that the Lord is with me and will strengthen me to bear what lays before me. The time is near at hand. I will close, hoping to meet you and the sweet babies in heaven. I love you all to the end. Good bye, dear ones.”* ** *“Dear Father: I feel that the good Lord is my strength to me at that great hour. I want to meet you in heaven. Turn while you have time. God bless you and meet me in heaven. Tell Mary good-bye. Tell her to meet me in heaven. I would write more, but the time is drawing near. Goodbye, meet me in heaven.”* ** *“Religious services were held at the jail last night by Revs. Wheeler, Harwood and Brooks, assisted by several Christian women, after which Brown made a short talk and led in prayer. After the services he expressed himself as being dissatisfied with his religion, and at his request, the ministers and Mr. Tom Shader remained with him. They labored with him until twelve o’clock, but to all appearances their efforts were all in vain. After twelve o’clock he laid down to rest, and slept soundly. When the ministers left him at five o’clock, he was still unreconciled to his fate and was weeping.* ** *“Shortly before seven o’clock his mood changed. He had been meditating for some moments, thinking of a proposition made to him by Rev. J. W. Wheeler, when he arose from his seat, gave Mr. Wheeler his hand and told him he was confident of meeting him in heaven and was reconciled to his fate.* ** *“People coming to see the hanging began to arrive early yesterday afternoon, and by sun down there was a good sized crowd in town. There were people from all the neighboring counties and some from a distance. They continued to arrive in large numbers last night, and at the time of the execution there were probably 4,000 people in all with a force of nine special policemen who were put on duty yesterday to keep order, but so far the crowd has been very quiet and orderly.* ** *“The death warrant was read to Brown Friday evening about 4 o’clock by Deputy Sheriff John Rousseau. Profound silence reigned throughout the jail as the warrant was read. Mr. Rousseau’s voice trembling slightly as he read it. Brown remained silent for several minutes, and then said, ‘It is an awful death to die, but I am praying God for grace to meet it.’ At the request of both Brown and the officers, a brief religious service was held, in which all participated. The service was a very impressive one, and the eyes of several present unused to weeping, were dimmed with tears. Brown made a brief talk, in which he admonished all his hearers to take warning from the fate of Franklin, and himself, to watch close for the house in which the tempter comes, and not allow themselves to be caught in the meshes of sin. Several crowds of people visited him during the day, among whom were many little school boys. Brown talked to all who came to see him. (NOTE: John Franklin had already been hung for the murder of his mother-in-law. It is interesting that little boys were allowed to come see him – perhaps as a warning not to kill someone.)* ** *“Brown’s wife and four children and his aunt, Mrs. Slayton, came to see him Friday morning, which was the second time he had seen his family since the night he committed the crime, and their meeting was a very effecting scene. Brown kissed all his children through the bars of his cell and wept like a child. His youngest child, an infant, did not recognize him. His wife also cried bitterly. Among other things, she told him, ‘Bob, you have done me a great wrong, but I freely forgive you. Little did I think when we married that our parting would be like this.’ Brown could not reply for his emotion and continued to weep silently. Mrs. Alonzo McClellan, wife of the murdered man, sent word to Brown Friday morning that, however great and irreparable the injury he had done to her famly, she had forgiven him.* ** *Next follows his confession which has been shown in earlier articles. I will conclude the story next week.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    09/05/2017 02:42:43
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] Fwd: [KY-MEM] AFTER THE MILKING
    2. Jim
    3. The thing about churning butter differed with the below narrative. We at the time lived in Smiths Grove, Kentucky on a farm that Dad was a farm hand on. We were the only white family who were field hands on that farm at that period of time. We did separate the milk and cream by putting it into a glass jar, allowing the cream to rise to the top. Then pouring the cream off the top being careful not to get any milk. Then when enough cream had been collected it was put into a one gallon jug, [usually about 1/2 jar full] Us kids [I was only about 3 or 4 years old. Would place that jug in our lap, and rock it forward and back until the butter had formed or until we could get another brother to relieve us. That was not a chore that I liked very much. I do remember that gallon jug was larger than the length of my thighs. Jim Tomes -----Original Message----- From: Sandi Gorin <sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> To: KENTUCKY-MEMORIES <KENTUCKY-MEMORIES@rootsweb.com> Sent: Mon, Sep 4, 2017 8:30 am Subject: [KY-MEM] AFTER THE MILKING *AFTER THE MILKING****Happy Labor Day!**** I had a lot of emails after the memory of last week on milking cows. As promised, here’s what came next.**** I remember vaguely the process of separating cream but not to great detail. Now, originally, the farmer or his wife would wait until the cream rose to the top of the bucket of milk and they would ladle it off. But, that took a while, especially if it was a big bucket. So someone came up with the idea of pouring the milk out little by little into a shallow bucket or dish … and again, waiting. As the milk sat; germs and bugs could get in; and the cream would sour from sitting so long. In 1789 a Swedish inventor came up with a cream separator. The separator came with a bowl, 2 pipes, a float and a milk container. The bowl rotated as 1200 rpm when one wound the handle causing the cream (the lighter part of milk) to come to the center of the bowl; and through an outlet to the cream bucket. The remaining milk was called skimmed milk and came out of the other pipe. This process was improved over the years but I have no memory of the process or what the machine looked like.** Making butter was back-breaking! In asking my Aunt Jean, she remembered the one at my grandparent’s house well; it was a Dazy brand. Below is an early recipe for making butter:** 1. - Pour the cream into the churn, then see that the temperature of the cream is correct for churning. About 50 to 60 degrees in hot weather and 60 to 70 degrees in cold weather. Either sweet or sour cream may be used in making butter, however, the best results, both in respect to quality and quantity are secured with cream which has become slightly sour, just to a degree that gives it a pleasant acid taste. Don't fail to set milk in a cool place where the air is dry, pure and free from all orders.** 2.- Now turn the crank about 80 revolutions per minute until butter has formed into grains about the size of wheat. DO NOT CHURN ANY LONGER AS IT WILL ONLY BALL THE BUTTER INTO A MASS. In their suggestions, they say to stop churning when butter has formed in grains like rice, as further churning will not secure any more butter, but injures the quality and makes more work for you.** 3.- Next place cloth or fine strainer over mouth of jar and pour off the milk, leaving butter in the churn, then fill the jar two thirds full of clean, cool water, replace the dasher and turn the crank a few times, this washes the butter grains free of all milk. If first water does not wash thoroughly repeat.** 4.- Pour water with the butter into a cloth or fine strainer, this catches the butter and allows the water to run through, now place the butter (which is still in the granular form ) in a dish and after standing a few minutes all the water will have drained from the butter and it is then ready to salt and mold.** TO SALT THE BUTTER; first spread the butter which is still in the granular form, in a thin layer, now sprinkle evenly over the butter one ounce of fine salt (more or less to suit taste) to each pound of butter and then work just enough to evenly distribute the salt through the butter.** IMPORTANT: Do not wash the jar with warm water immediately after churning as the jar is very cold and the rapid expansion caused by the sudden change of temperature might break the jar.** I am asking now for you who are farmers to make comments on this tip! If you have stories, corrections or additions, please write me on the list! I know that the machines had to be cleaned thoroughly, it was a hard job! If you have something to contribute, a better description of the machines, etc., please post to the list*.**-- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia InquistoremSandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.htmlGenealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php---This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.https://www.avast.com/antivirus -------------------------------To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to KENTUCKY-MEMORIES-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    09/04/2017 12:59:47
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] AFTER THE MILKING
    2. I remember churning the way Jim described. I didn't grow up on a farm, but we got milk from neighbors that did have a cow or cows. Our local historical society here in our county in MO has school children come out to our historical park toward the end of the school year. It is so funny to watch them turn cream into butter. It is just like magic for them. These are third grade children and they are so fun to watch with the churning and other things.

    09/04/2017 12:24:48
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A STUDY IN SCARLET - LETTERS AND ESCAPE ATTEMPT - PART 4
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *A STUDY IN SCARLET – LETTERS AND ESCAPE ATTEMPT - PART 4* ** *We pick up with the /Glasgow Times/ issue of February 9, 1899: Refused to pardon Brown.* ** *“Though Bob Brown, the murderer sentenced to be hanged here has repeatedly asserted that he was confident the Court of Appeals would set aside the judgement of the Barren Circuit Court, he last week petitioned Governor Bradley to extend executive clemency in his case, which the Governor flatly refused to do. The petition was a personal letter from the doomed man, who had made a strong appeal that his life be spared on account of his family, and, incidentally, because he had been a life long Republican and thought it a great honor to be allowed to vote for Gov. Bradley.* ** *“Brown also wrote a letter to President McKinley, to whom he told his tale of woe, and asked that he use his influence in securing his pardon, but Mr. McKinley has so far, ignored him.”* ** *On Monday, Feb. 27, 1899 the /Times’ /headline read: BROWN TRIES TO ESCAPE* ** *“Since the Court of Appeals affirmed the death sentence of Bob Brown, last Tuesday, he has been in a very desperate mood, pacing up and down his cell by day and tossing about on his cot by night, as if meditating self-destruction or escape.* ** *“Friday evening about 6 o’clock, as Jailer Carter entered his cell to clean it, Brown pounced upon him before he knew his intentions and threw him on the floor, at the same time searching him for his keys or pistols. Although Brown is a giant compared to Jailer Carter, the latter grappled with him bravely, and held him until the other prisoners, who were outside of the cells, came to his assistance. Brown was finally over-powered by force and dragged back into his cell and locked up. He is now kept under guard, and will not have the opportunity to make another such attempt soon. Had it not been for the timely assistance rendered Jailer Carter by the other prisoners, Brown’s attempt would doubtless resulted successfully.* ** *(NOTE here: One of the other prisoners at the time was John Franklin, charged with the murder of his mother-in-law.)* ** *“After Brown had been put back in his cell, he explained to the crowd that had been attracted to the jail by the commotion, that he did not intend to harm Jailer Carter, but saw one chance in a hundred to escape, and in taking advantage of it he only did what every other man would have done under similar circumstances. He also asserted that he expected aid from the other prisoners, as they had frequently expressed (two lines blurred out) – them assisting. Mr. Carter declared that they were all liars, and had acted the part of traitors to him.* ** *“Brown’s wife and four children called on him at the jail Saturday afternoon for the first time since his arrest. His wife asked him if he was prepared to die, to which he replied that at times he held he was prepared and at others he was doubtful. His wife then warned him that it was time he was becoming reconciled to his fate, as he would surely be hung, at which Brown broke down completely and cried like a baby. After a pathetic scene, Brown told his wife to raise up their children in the fear of God and make honest, law-abiding citizens of them.* ** */The Glasgow Times/ continued their day by day headlines on March 16, 1899: BROWN WRITES A LETTER. * ** *“Editor, /Glasgow Times:/ I desire to write a few lines for your paper. As my days on earth are but a few, according to man’s numbering, I trust that what I may say may prove a blessing to those who may read this. I write from experience. We are all erring creatures and unless we are ever on our guar4d we are liable to get into trouble. When we say “peace and safety,” then comes sudden destruction. We have a knowedge of the past, we can not tell what is to come. A large number of our fallen race live out their best days before they realize that their best days are gone. There are many paths in the world, but there is only one that we may ever walk in and ever be safe – that is the path of the right before God. If I could have the privilege of living my life over, the first step of life would be to seek God and His righteousness and endeavor to walk close to my Savior; and then I should ever be safe from harm and evil. I have learned enough since I have been in this trouble, if I had the privilege of living to get the benefit of it, it would be worth more to me than much gold and silver.* ** *“I wish to say to those who have turned to be my enemies without a cause, those whom I have never harmed in my life, especially those who were in that mob that wanted to take my life, you know not how soon you may be in the same condition. I hope that no such a misfortune may ever come upon any of you. I do not desire to hold malice against any one on earth who has turned a cold shoulder to me. I am sure if you had considered what was right and had treated me like you would have wanted me to have treated you, if you had been placed in my condition, you would have been my friend instead of my prosecutor. Those of you who have precious families who lay near your heart, I hope you may never have to bear the burdensome sorrow of giving up your dear loved ones as I have. May God pity the poor man who has no sympathy for his fellow man whose path misfortune hath overshadowed, whose freedom and liberty, yea, even his life, is to be taken from him, and who has to leave the wife of his bosom and four dear children, I love my family, I believe, dear as any man. While we all have to lay down our lives sooner or later, we should not wink our eye at the downfall of our fellowman, for we must all appear before the judgment seat of Christ. By our words we shall be justified, and by our words we shall be condemned.* ** *“There is a poor man in this town who has made an attempt to get a sketch of my life from childhood up. He went to my wife to get this information. She told him that he would have to go to some one else, as she had not known me very long before we were married. He said on his return that he had gotten a six-page history of my life. He asked her for one of my pictures, and she gave him one, thinking it would do me no harm. She gave him no history at all. If he wants a history of my life, let him go to those twelve or fifteen good men who gave account of my life on the day of my trial – many of them having known me from the cradle. What he has got, he has gotten from some enemy of mine, all of which has taken place since the night of November 10, last. May the Lord have mercy on each & every one that would attempt to take advantage of a helpless woman and four little children to say that she had given him a history of her husband’s life and try to bring disgrace on her and her little little (sic) children, making false statements in order to get a little money over the downfall of someone else. I thank God that while I was with my little family, I labored hard and made them an honest and plentiful living. I did not try to make it by the destruction of the character of others. I am glad to say I have more respect for this little family than that. May the good Lord forgive him; I will. I do not mean to hold malice against any one on earth. If there is any one who holds anything against me, I ask you to forgive me. If there is any one who would like to speak to me on this line, they have to come to me. I can’t go to the. Respectfully, R. L. Brown.”* ** *Under the same date: Glasgow, Ky. March 15, ’99. “To the Christian People Who May Read These Few Lines. I humbly ask to be remembered in your prayers. As Christ came to seek and to save those that were lost, as Christ remembered you in the hour of trouble, may you remember me in your sympathy and prayers. Respectfully, R. L. Brown.”* ** *Next week “Into Eternity.”* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    08/29/2017 02:51:17
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] Fwd: [KY-MEM] A SHORT STUDY OF MILCH COWS
    2. Jim
    3. I for one remember churning that cream into butter. Mom always had a glass one gallon jug used exclusive for this purpose. She would put the cream in and we kids had to sit and rock this jug back and forth until the butter magically appeared. Since the first 5 kids were all boys, we were drafted to do this chore as well. The cream was too valuable to be just drank and so was "skimmed" off the top and used for numerous things == one of which was butter. -----Original Message----- From: Sandi Gorin <sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> To: KENTUCKY-MEMORIES <KENTUCKY-MEMORIES@rootsweb.com> Sent: Mon, Aug 28, 2017 8:01 am Subject: [KY-MEM] A SHORT STUDY OF MILCH COWS *A Short Study of Milch Cows**** Have you ever seen a milch cow? If you grew up on the farm you likely have. This is what milk or dairy cows were called in the past. In looking at the old inventories of the 1800’s, milch cows were always listed and brought a good price. They were a necessity to the settlers to provide milk, cream and cheese for the family. And, come rain or shine, sleet or heat waves, those cows had to be milked twice a day. **** I’m not sure what breed of cows those early settlers had but here are the major breeds:**** Brown Swiss: These originated in the Swiss Alps, produce a great amount of milk and are very tolerant of cold weather and extremes. They were brought to America in 1869 and are still considered very important to farmers.**** Guernsey: This breed came from the British Isle of Guernsey in the English Channel. They were kept and bred by monks from French Norman/Breton cattle lines. Guernsey’s showed up in America in 1840 when brought by ship. They are smaller, about 3/5ths the size of a Holstein but are good producers.**** Holstein-Friesian: Northern Germany was the home of this breed and in the Netherlands. They are well recognized by their black and white coloring. These arrived in the US in the 1850’s and produce large quantities of milk.**** Jersey: Straight from Britain’s Isle of Jersey and close to the Isle of Guernsey off the coast of France, this is known as a pure breed. They also were imported to the US in the 1850’s. They are also a smaller breed. **** Milking Shorthorn. This breed was developed originally for beef in Britain, this variety is for milking. They are moderate producers of milk and likely were the first breed to see the New World in 1783. Settlers milked them and butchered them for beef.**** Of all the breeds above, my grandfather raised all but the Milking Shorthorn if I remember right. Thankfully I was a younger girl when we lived on my grandfather’s farm and I assume I wasn’t considered trustworthy enough to milk. There was one Jersey, “Madge” who was gentle enough to let me try a few times but I never mastered the job.**** The things I remember: Having the cow grow impatient and kick the bucket over (or your leg if it was closer), the cow’s tail swishing in your face to rid themselves of horseflies. Oh how I hated the latter! There were always barn cats sitting there waiting for their daily dose and farmers were prone to shoot some milk into their mouths. Those barn cats needed to be fed too; they kept the mouse and rat families under control.**** Today? Milking machines. I feel for the cow though. Even though it might not be pleasant to the cow to be milked by hand; it had to be done. But when the electric milking machine took over the tedious chore it helped the farmer but likely is not as comfortable to the cow. Can you imagine a cow mooing as if to say “it’s on wrong and it’s pinching me!”**** I, like many of you, grew up for many years drinking unpasteurized milk, eating homemade butter and cheese. Somehow we survived!* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia InquistoremSandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.htmlGenealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php---This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.https://www.avast.com/antivirus -------------------------------To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to KENTUCKY-MEMORIES-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    08/28/2017 03:00:58
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A STUDY IN SCARLET - PART 3
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *A STUDY IN SCARLET – PART 3* ** *We pick up with the testimonies for the prosecution from the /Glasgow Times./* ** *“Lewis McClellan, seventeen years old and a son of Alonzo McClellan, substantiated the testimony of his mother. When Brown came into the house, he went after his pistol, as he expected trouble. He returned in time to see Brown shoot his father and little Bertha. He then shot at the murderer, wounding him in the back of the neck at the base of the skull, the bullet glancing off without accomplishing the mission. Brown then knocked the pistol out of his hand and they clinched and fell over the bed. He was beaten over the head and in the mouth with Brown’s pistol. After a little while they separated and Lewis left the house and went to the home of his brother, Tom McClellan, to inform him of the tragedy. He afterwards heard shooting and went over there (Slayton’s) to find that his mother had been pursued by Brown and shot through a window. He denied that he had shot at Brown more than once, but admitted that the pistol might have gone off in the scuffle without his knowledge. He also identified a --- (missing) produced in court as the one with which his father was murdered.* ** *“Bertha Courtney, the brave little eleven-year old girl who knocked the barrel of Brown’s pistol down when he started to shoot her grandfather the second time, and was herself frightfully wounded, was the next witness for the prosecution. There was nothing new in her testimony, but she elicited the admiration of every man in the courtroom.* ** *“Sheriff Barlow and Deputy Sheriff Powell Barlow told of Brown’s resistance, and his surrender to Mr. Tip Depp when they started to set fire to the barn in which he was hiding. Deputy Marshal G. R. Bailey testified that he brought Brown to town behind him on his horse, and while on the way Brown volunteered a confession of the crime. Brown told him old man McClellan struck him with a cane first and then he shot him to scare him off. He followed Mrs. McClellan to Jim Slayton’s house and shot her to satisfy his revenge. He said he had no intention of shooting the old man or little Bertha and was sorry he had done so.* ** *“Mr. Sam Knipp said Brown had made substantially the same confession to him at the Glasgow Depot the day he was taken to Bowling Green.* ** *“The first witness called for the defense was Dr. Wells, of Slick Rock, who stated that he had been Brown’s family physician for several years and had never noticed anything that would indicate an unsound mind. Upon the case being hypothecated, he said Brown might have been crazy at the time of the killing, but his action in coming out of the barn when an attempt was made to burn it was that of a sane man. He had examined the wound in the back of Brown’s head, but not closely enough to tell whether the ball had entered the skull or glanced off. The wound was at the base of the skull.* ** *“Sandusky Bruton, a close neighbor, was intimately acquainted with Brown and had never seen anything wrong with him. His reputation was good.* ** *“The Commonwealth here admitted an affidavit, signed by Brown, alleging that Rev. Payton Sharpe was unable to appear in court, but that if he was placed on the witness stand he would swear that Brown’s mind at one time was unbalanced and that he did not know right from wrong.* ** *“Sterling Smith had known Brown since he was a small boy, and stated that his reputation in the neighborhood was good. * ** *“J. J. Wells, aged seventy-nine years, had known the defendant since he was a small boy, and never heard anything against him.* ** *“Adolph Depp, for four years Sheriff of the County knew the defendant well, and his reputation was that of a peaceable, law-abiding citizen.* ** *“Miller Moore had known Brown twenty years, and never knew anything derogatory to his character up to the time of the killing.* ** *Tom Brown, father of the murderer, stated that one of Bob’s brothers had died in a demented condition and another had died in a fit. He had heard of a rumor that the cause of the demented boy’s condition was a blow from a stick in the hands of Bob, but did not know whether it was so or not. Twelve years ago Bob’s mind had become unbalanced on the subject of baptism and he would sit around for a day or two without speaking a word.* ** *“J. B. Depp lived two miles from Brown, and he had a good reputation in the neighborhood. Had heard that he was vindictive and overbearing to his wife and children.* ** *“Joe Smith had known Brown ten to twelve years, lived in the community, and knew his reputation to be good.* ** *“Mrs. John Slayton said that Mrs. McClellan in her presence, had told her son Herman that Brown looked like a crazy man when he came to her house the night of the killing. Her son told her to be careful what she said on the subject.* ** *“Henry Bowles knew Brown intimately and his reputation was good.* ** *“John Slayton, a cousin of Brown, said that the reputation of the defendant was as good as average in the community.* ** *“Park Story said he had known Brown for twelve years, and that his reputation was good as far as he knew.* ** *“Rev. James Meek knew Brown to be a good, law-abiding citizen.* ** *“Esq. J. C. Pickett had known Brown since 1870 as a man of good reputation. Had issued a warrant for his arrest at one time, but the case was tried before another magistrate.* ** *“Wat Glover had known Brown all his life as a reputable citizen. Had heard since the killing that the defendant was violent, vindictive and overbearing.* ** *“ Jack Ragland knew Brown as a good man.* ** *“Dr. H. W. Coombs, F. J. Taylor and Anderson Rowe, upon the case being hypothetical, each in turn stated that there was no evidence whatever of Brown being insane at any time.* ** *“J. C. Jenkins and J. H. Boles knew Brown as a violent, vindictive, overbearing and quarrelsome neighbor.”* ** *The testimonies are over and this is where the /Times/ picked up on Thursday, December 15, 1898: “NEW TRIAL REFUSED.”* ** *“The motion for a new trial in the case of Bob Brown, who was convicted at the present term of court, of the willful murder of his father-in-law, Alonzo McClellan, and given the penalty of death, was argued before Judge Jones Monday afternoon. The motion was over-ruled and the case will be taken to the Court of Appeals.* ** *“As grounds for a new trial, the counsel for Brown introduced two affidavits, in which the affiants avowed that two of the jury-men who sat in the case had said to them before being summoned as jurors, that if they were on the jury they would break the accused’s neck. This charge was denied by the two jurymen in question. The counsel for the defense also contended that there was evidence tending to prove that the killing was accidental, and that the court failed to instruct the jury upon that point. Another reason for a new trial advanced that one of the men summoned to serve on the jury, when asked if he had an opinion in the matter, declared before ten jurors already selected, that he believed Brown out to be hanged, thereby influencing the ten jurors in rendering their verdict. The court was of the opinion that none of the arguments advanced were sufficient to justify the granting of a new trial.”* ** *We will pause here and pick up next week with a plea for a pardon from the Governor, his wife’s visit and Brown starts writing letters.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    08/22/2017 01:43:57
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A STUDY IN SCARLET - CHAPTER 2
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *NOTE! We have picked up quite a few new members of this list! I know you want to read Chapter 1. If you will send me an email at sgorin@glasgow-ky.com, I will send you the first chapter so you'll know what happened. * *Sandi * * * *A STUDY IN SCARLET – CHAPTER 2* ** *Saturday morning at 10 o’clock Brown was brought out for his examining trial before Judge G. M. Bohannon, but he waived examination and was held to await the action of the grand jury to be impaneled by Judge Jones upon the convening of the Circuit Court Monday of next week.* ** *When lodged in jail here Friday evening, Brown appeared to be greatly excited and trembled visibly. It was evident that he feared summary justice would be meted out to him before the dawn of another day. After a little he quieted down and became perfectly calm and when asked by a representative of /The Times/ to relate the facts of the killing he made the following statement:* ** *“I went down to old man McClellan’s house to see why he wouldn’t let Terry come up to my house. Without saying a word when I entered, the old man started at me with his cane, and I drew my pistol and fired to scare him off. Then his son drew his pistol and shot me in the back of my neck. This so inflamed me that I lost all control of myself, and kept on firing. When I had emptied my pistol, I turned on Lewis and with one kick knocked his weapon out of his hand, and then we went together in a scuff.* ** *“I wrenched myself loose from him and he jumped up and ran away. I picked up my pistol and the one that belonged to the boy and went out into the yard to see what had become of the old lady and the girl. Not seeing anything of them I concluded that they had gone over to Slayton’s. When I got up to the house I saw the old lady through the window talking to Slayton and I poked my gun through the window and shot her. I don’t (know) what made me kill her unless it was because I felt like my revenge was not complete. The others just happened to get in my way, I did not intend to kill them.”* ** *Upon the door of the barn where Brown concealed himself was a picture of a man drawn by Brown, which he had been using as a target for pistol practice, and within the lines representing the man’s breast were some fifty or more bullet holes.* ** *At a late hour last night Mrs. McClellan and her little grand-daughter were resting easy, and it was thought that the chances for her recovery of the later were improving.* ** *The next edition of the /Glasgow Times/, December 1, 1898 read as follows:* ** *The case of Bob Brown, charged with willfully murdering his father-in-law, Alonzo McClellan, on the night of November 10, is now before the court and will be tried as soon as an unbiased jury can be impaneled.* ** *When the case was called yesterday morning, Messrs. D. R. Carr and J. O. Hutcherson, attorneys appointed to defend Brown, after a brief consultation, filed an affidavit setting forth reasons why their client could not be given a fair and impartial trial at the present term of court and asking for a continuance of the case to the March term. This court refused to grant Messrs. Carr and Hutcherson (who) then made a motion asking, inasmuch as the reports of the tragedy published in the local newspapers had prejudiced the people of Barren County against the defendant, that the jurymen be summoned from the neighboring counties. The County ruled against the defendant that the jurymen be summoned from the neighboring counties. The motion was overruled by Judge Jones, who expressed his opinion that the defendant could get a just verdict from a Barren County jury, however strong public sentiment might be against him.* ** *Up to last night the sheriff had failed to fine the required number of jurymen who had not formed an opinion of the defendant’s guilt or innocence, or had no conscientious scruples against inflicting the death penalty, and the deputies were scouring the county in every direction.* ** *The court room was crowded with anxious spectators all the time Brown was before the court, and intense interest was manifested in the proceedings.* ** *Mrs. Alonzo McClellan and her little grand-daughter, Bertha Courtney, who were also shot by Brown and at the time thought fatally wounded, have sufficiently recovered from their injuries to be able to attend court. Brown’s wife was also in attendance yesterday, but refused to have a talk with her husband when the latter requested it.* ** *To be continued in the next issue with court testimonies from those involved in the murder and people in the neighborhood. Then the sentencing.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    08/15/2017 01:53:31
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] A STUDY IN SCARLET - CHAPTER 1
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *A STUDY IN SCARLET – CHAPTER 1* *For several posts, I’m going to take you back in time and ask you to join me in a murder case. This happened in my home county of Barren County and is taken from _Blood Runs in the Barrens_, one of books I authored. The account is taken from trial records and newspaper accounts. So, sit back and watch as events unfold.* *Barren County has always been and continues to be a safe and peaceful area. However, in 1898 citizens were shaken to the core when two murders occurred. One was the murder by John Franklin of his mother-in-law; the second which will be covered here over several posts, by Robert Lincoln Brown. Our story now begins.* ** *While Barren Countians were reeling from the atrocious murder by John Franklin of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Bowles, they had yet another sadness and excitement. Robert Lincoln Brown, called Bob, was also involved in a murder, this of his father-in-law, Alonzo McClellan. I will let the /_Glasgow Times_/ report the events as they unfold in this case, November 14, 1898 issue.* ** *A TRIPLE TRAGEDY* *BOB BROWN Kills His Father-in-Law and Fatally Wounds Two Others* *The Bloodiest Tragedy in the Criminal Annals of Barren County.* *A study in scarlet* ** *Without a doubt, the most horrible crime that has darkened the fair name of Barren County in his history, was committed in the peaceful little neighborhood of Neal’s Chapel, three miles out from Glasgow, on the Columbia Road last Thursday night, when Bob Brown shot and instantly killed his father-in-law, Mr. Alonzo McClellan, and fatally wounded his mother-in-law, Mrs. McClellan, and little Beulah Courtney, a grandchild of Mrs. McClellan. When John Franklin shot and killed his mother-in-law, Mrs. Bowles, near Beckton, last September, it was thought to be a most fiendish assassination, but it cannot be compared to the triple tragedy enacted by Bob Brown.* ** *The murderer, Bob Brown, is a son of Mr. Tom Brown, of the Neal’s Chapel country, and is a young man, if he lives till next January, he will be thirty four years old. Previous to the night of his crime, he was regarded as a quiet, law abiding citizen, was considered a devout member of the church to which he belonged, and for three years was trustee of the school district in which he lived. He is six foot three inches tall, weighs 171 pounds, and is rather a good looking fellow, despite the fact that he has but one eye. A remarkable fact concerning his character is that he neither drinks, smokes tobacco, nor swears, although it is said he was --- (missing) and child --- (missing) –ping his wife on one occasion … (missing) then located him in the smoke house and kept him there for over twenty-four hours.* ** *Seven years ago Brown married a daughter of Alonzo McClellan, a highly respected farmer living near Neal’s Chapel, and went to housekeeping within a short distance of the home of his father-in-law. The fruits of this marriage are three children, a boy and two girls. From the first, Brown and his father-in-law’s family failed to agree, and there was frequent trouble between them, and finally McClellan forbade Brown coming to his house and for three years he has not been there, notwithstanding the proximity of the two dwellings, and he and his father-in-law had not spoken. George Slayton, another son-in-law of McClellan, lived about two hundred yards away and other members of the family lived in the same neighborhood. Brown was at outs with them all. He had worked himself into a feeling of deep hatred for all his father-in-law’s family, and had, it is said, made threats of violence, but his actions Thursday night was wholly unexpected and without the slightest provocation.* ** *McClellan had another daughter, named Terry, a lass of not more than fifteen summers, who was a great favorite with Brown, notwithstanding his enmity for her father. (Note: she was thirteen.) The girl stayed at Brown’s house with her sister a good deal of her time and Brown’s attention to her became so unusual that the tongues of the neighborhood were soon set to wagging with slanderous reports. The gossip soon reached the ears of McClellan and he immediately stopped his daughter from visiting the house of her sister. Last Thursday night the girl was asked to spend the night with Brown’s family, to which she consented, but she did not gain the consent of her parents and consequently did not go. When she did not come at the appointed hour, Brown put a pistol in his pocket. * ** *McClellan and his family had finished their supper and he was warming his feet prepatory to retiring for the night. His wife and little granddaughter, Bertha Courtney, a child of a dead daughter, were in the room with him. Suddenly and without warning, Brown entered the room and asked, “where is Terry?” McClellan ordered him to leave the house instantly. Brown then deliberately drew his pistol and shot the old man through the heart killing him instantaneously. About this time, Lewis McClellan, a son of the old man and about seventeen years old, entered with a pistol in his hand, and fired at Brown from behind, the ball striking him in the back of the head and glancing off without inflicting any great injury. Brown wrenched the pistol out of the boy’s hand and knocked him down. What became of the boy after is not known.* ** *In the meantime little Bertha had run screaming from the house and started for the home of her uncle, George Slayton, not far away. Brown, thirsting for more blood pursued and overtook her and shot her. The child fell into a gully, and Brown fired another shot into her prostate form, wounding her seriously, but not fatally. * ** *Mrs. McClellan, the mother-in-law, had fled the house and took refuge at her son-in-law’s, Slayton.* ** *Going by his house, Brown secured his double barreled shotgun and went gunning for other members of the family.* ** *He went straight to the Slayton’s where he knew his mother-in-law was and ---missing (fired) – through the --- (window) – over two hundred shots in her body, from which she will die.* ** *He also shot Slayton in the arm.* ** *After shooting Mrs. McClellan, Brown returned to his home, armed himself heavily and went directly to his barn, where he hid himself and prepared for a siege.* ** *As soon as the news of the killing was received in town Thursday night, Deputy Marshals Scott and Bailey hurried to the scene but Brown could not be found that night. Friday morning the officers were joined by Marshal Collins, Sheriff Barlow and Deputy Sheriff Powell Barlow, and the search was renewed. Brown’s wife was found at her home and the officers had to order her to leave, as they wanted to search the house and feared if Brown was there a fight would occur. Mrs. Brown seems to have stood by her husband and evidently knew then where he was concealed, but would not give him away.* ** *Brown was finally discovered hid in his barn, but so entrenched in a corner of the loft that the officers could not reach him without danger of being shot down. The only – (missing - clue) to his position was by means of a ladder which Brown commanded, and as soon as the officers attempted to get at him he opened fire on them, wounding Sheriff Barlow in the hand, shooting a hole in Tom Glass’ ear and blowing the hat off Ed Neece’s head with a discharge from his shotgun. Several other had hair breadth escapes. The officers fired a volley of about a hundred shots into the loft and then hastily retreated. Brown was desperate and they knew it. As a last resort, Deputy Sheriff Powell Barlow slipped up to the rear of the barn and lit a match. When Brown found they intended to burn him out of his hiding place he began to parley and promised to surrender if the officers would obligate themselves not to let anyone kill him. With the assurance of protection, he came down and gave himself up. After handcuffs had been placed upon his wrists, still pretending to be religious, Brown knelt down on the ground and made a fervent prayer to be forgiven for his awful crime.* ** *About fifty mounted men armed with pistols and shotguns, escorted him to town and to the jail, where he was lodged safely behind the bars. It was feared that a mob from the Neal’s Chapel country would attempt to lynch the prisoner Friday night, and the jail was heavily guarded all that night, but the attempt was not made.* ** *Next week – Brown in jail.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    08/08/2017 01:22:02
    1. Re: [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] KENTUCKY-LEGENDS Digest, Vol 8, Issue 31
    2. Nice, Enjoyed the article. True History -----Original Message----- From: kentucky-legends-request <kentucky-legends-request@rootsweb.com> To: kentucky-legends <kentucky-legends@rootsweb.com> Sent: Wed, Aug 2, 2017 3:08 am Subject: KENTUCKY-LEGENDS Digest, Vol 8, Issue Send KENTUCKY-LEGENDS mailing list submissions to kentucky-legends@rootsweb.com To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit http://lists9.rootsweb.ancestry.com/mailman/listinfo/kentucky-legends or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to kentucky-legends-request@rootsweb.com You can reach the person managing the list at kentucky-legends-owner@rootsweb.com When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than "Re: Contents of KENTUCKY-LEGENDS digest..." Today's Topics: 1. McFADDEN'S STATION (Sandi Gorin) ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Message: 1 Date: Tue, 1 Aug 2017 07:38:09 -0500 From: Sandi Gorin <sgorin@glasgow-ky.com> To: <KENTUCKY-LEGENDS@rootsweb.com> Subject: [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] McFADDEN'S STATION Message-ID: <60b689cc-86c6-edef-6525-b5a495544300@glasgow-ky.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=utf-8; format=flowed *McFadden?s Station* *Courtesy UrbanLegendsofBarrenCounty edited by Georgette Lee.* *"This is an excerpt from an article that ran in the December 4, 1955 edition of the Park City Daily News ? now in Bowling Green. The author of this article is not stated, but it is noted by myself that the section was rewritten in a county bicentennial article in April 1997, almost verbatim. This author also plainly states that the info gathered on David Chapman and his station was taken from his 1884 obituary in the Louisville Courier Journal. Enjoy ?* ** *?In 1778, Andrew McFadden became the first recorded settler in Warren County, and built a home 4 miles east of today?s Bowling Green near the mouth of Drakes Creek. With the increasing influx of pioneers on the Cumberland Trace, he established McFadden Station, which became the resting stop * *of many marketers heading South and pioneers pushing West.* * ?By the early 1790s McFadden Station visitor Robert Moore stopped for a few days, scouting for a settlement site for his family. He built a cabin where the Mariah Moore building stands on State Street and 8th Avenue, close to Big Spring. The spring once ran through Spring Alley, located behind the Main Street businesses.* * ?About 2 miles east of Bowling Green on top of a bluff overlooking Drakes Creek at Chapman?s Bridge (now known as Middle Bridge) is a smaller cemetery where lies the remains of the first child born in Southern Kentucky. The cemetery is bordered by a waist-high stone wall and woven wire fence. Inside the crumbling stone wall are some 8 or 10 weather-beaten monuments shaded by several cedar trees (and so much more today! GL) On one of the stones is engraved the following: * *David Chapman* *Born Oct. 25, 1791* *Died Oct. 28, 1884* * He was the first white child born in KY south of the Green River. ?Besides Chapman, the old cemetery contains both his wives and several of his descendants. According to an article in an 1884 edition of Louisville Courier Journal at KY Library at WKU, David Chapman was born at McFadden Station nearly opposite the mouth of Drakes Creek, one of its principal tributaries, 3 miles east of Bowling Green.* * ?His father, Thomas Chapman, sometime during the year 1790, moved from Virginia with several other families to Southern Kentucky, and for protection against the Indians, joined a few pioneers who had established themselves at this point. The Chapmans remained about a year at the station, then moved to a stockaded dwelling they had prepared some 4 or 5 miles up Drakes Creek from the station.* * ?Here every morning and evening, with beat of drum and shouldered musket, Chapman marched around his stockade at the head of his family ? 6 boys, his wife and daughter, and a Negro woman ? all with guns, hats, coats, and small arms to scare the Indians and therefore discourage attacks. ?Indians always lurked just beyond the clearing waiting and watching for one of the Chapmans to show himself alone outside the stockade. David?s brother Abner was almost ambushed one day on the creek when he rode out horseback to look for some stray livestock.* *?On another occasion in David Chapman?s life, a man named Drake (Isaac) was hunting a mile or so up the creek, when Indians by answering his turkey call, lured him ?nigh to death.? Catching a glimpse of them concealed in the cane brakes, he turned and ran some distance up a steep bluff. They fired as he ran, but he did not know he was wounded until he saw the bushes sprinkled with blood. Wounded critically, he finally made his way to Chapman?s stockade where he received care and was nursed back to health. The creek was named after him.* * ?Amid such hardships, David Chapman was reared. Like his father, David was strong-willed and with a purpose. Chapman lived on the farm his father first settled upon. Chapman had prominent traits of character and resolute daring.* * ?During the Civil War, the winter of 1861-62, while the Confederates took control of Bowling Green, two companies of Scott?s Louisiana cavalry took possession of Chapman?s barns and pitched their tents nearby.* * ?Chapman was married early in his life to Miss Anna Percival of Hardin County, by whom he had 9 children. His second wife was the widow of Phillip Edward McElroy of Marion County. She bore him 6 children.?* ** *From E. Polk Johnson?s ?A History of KY, Vol. 2?:* * ?This Chapman family is an old and prominent one, figuring in the early history of KY, the Chapman settlement in southern Kentucky being well known in the annals of the state as one of the first settlements, founded by Thomas Chapman.* * ?Thomas Chapman, whose ancestors had come to Virginia from England early in the 18th century, moved to a point on Barren River 3 miles east of the present city of Bowling Green, about the close of the Revolutionary War.?* ** *On a final note, near Chapman?s station, besides the incident with Drake, a man named Fleenor was killed by Indians, and a comrade was mortally wounded.?* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus ------------------------------ Subject: Digest Footer To contact the KENTUCKY-LEGENDS list administrator, send an email to KENTUCKY-LEGENDS-admin@rootsweb.com. To post a message to the KENTUCKY-LEGENDS mailing list, send an email to KENTUCKY-LEGENDS@rootsweb.com. __________________________________________________________ To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to KENTUCKY-LEGENDS-request@rootsweb.com with the word "unsubscribe" without the quotes in the subject and the body of the email with no additional text. ------------------------------ End of KENTUCKY-LEGENDS Digest, Vol 8, Issue 31 ***********************************************

    08/02/2017 02:35:28
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] McFADDEN'S STATION
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *McFadden’s Station* *Courtesy UrbanLegendsofBarrenCounty edited by Georgette Lee.* *"This is an excerpt from an article that ran in the December 4, 1955 edition of the Park City Daily News – now in Bowling Green. The author of this article is not stated, but it is noted by myself that the section was rewritten in a county bicentennial article in April 1997, almost verbatim. This author also plainly states that the info gathered on David Chapman and his station was taken from his 1884 obituary in the Louisville Courier Journal. Enjoy –* ** *“In 1778, Andrew McFadden became the first recorded settler in Warren County, and built a home 4 miles east of today’s Bowling Green near the mouth of Drakes Creek. With the increasing influx of pioneers on the Cumberland Trace, he established McFadden Station, which became the resting stop * *of many marketers heading South and pioneers pushing West.* * “By the early 1790s McFadden Station visitor Robert Moore stopped for a few days, scouting for a settlement site for his family. He built a cabin where the Mariah Moore building stands on State Street and 8th Avenue, close to Big Spring. The spring once ran through Spring Alley, located behind the Main Street businesses.* * “About 2 miles east of Bowling Green on top of a bluff overlooking Drakes Creek at Chapman’s Bridge (now known as Middle Bridge) is a smaller cemetery where lies the remains of the first child born in Southern Kentucky. The cemetery is bordered by a waist-high stone wall and woven wire fence. Inside the crumbling stone wall are some 8 or 10 weather-beaten monuments shaded by several cedar trees (and so much more today! GL) On one of the stones is engraved the following: * *David Chapman* *Born Oct. 25, 1791* *Died Oct. 28, 1884* * He was the first white child born in KY south of the Green River. “Besides Chapman, the old cemetery contains both his wives and several of his descendants. According to an article in an 1884 edition of Louisville Courier Journal at KY Library at WKU, David Chapman was born at McFadden Station nearly opposite the mouth of Drakes Creek, one of its principal tributaries, 3 miles east of Bowling Green.* * “His father, Thomas Chapman, sometime during the year 1790, moved from Virginia with several other families to Southern Kentucky, and for protection against the Indians, joined a few pioneers who had established themselves at this point. The Chapmans remained about a year at the station, then moved to a stockaded dwelling they had prepared some 4 or 5 miles up Drakes Creek from the station.* * “Here every morning and evening, with beat of drum and shouldered musket, Chapman marched around his stockade at the head of his family – 6 boys, his wife and daughter, and a Negro woman – all with guns, hats, coats, and small arms to scare the Indians and therefore discourage attacks. “Indians always lurked just beyond the clearing waiting and watching for one of the Chapmans to show himself alone outside the stockade. David’s brother Abner was almost ambushed one day on the creek when he rode out horseback to look for some stray livestock.* *“On another occasion in David Chapman’s life, a man named Drake (Isaac) was hunting a mile or so up the creek, when Indians by answering his turkey call, lured him ‘nigh to death.’ Catching a glimpse of them concealed in the cane brakes, he turned and ran some distance up a steep bluff. They fired as he ran, but he did not know he was wounded until he saw the bushes sprinkled with blood. Wounded critically, he finally made his way to Chapman’s stockade where he received care and was nursed back to health. The creek was named after him.* * “Amid such hardships, David Chapman was reared. Like his father, David was strong-willed and with a purpose. Chapman lived on the farm his father first settled upon. Chapman had prominent traits of character and resolute daring.* * “During the Civil War, the winter of 1861-62, while the Confederates took control of Bowling Green, two companies of Scott’s Louisiana cavalry took possession of Chapman’s barns and pitched their tents nearby.* * “Chapman was married early in his life to Miss Anna Percival of Hardin County, by whom he had 9 children. His second wife was the widow of Phillip Edward McElroy of Marion County. She bore him 6 children.”* ** *From E. Polk Johnson’s “A History of KY, Vol. 2”:* * “This Chapman family is an old and prominent one, figuring in the early history of KY, the Chapman settlement in southern Kentucky being well known in the annals of the state as one of the first settlements, founded by Thomas Chapman.* * “Thomas Chapman, whose ancestors had come to Virginia from England early in the 18th century, moved to a point on Barren River 3 miles east of the present city of Bowling Green, about the close of the Revolutionary War.”* ** *On a final note, near Chapman’s station, besides the incident with Drake, a man named Fleenor was killed by Indians, and a comrade was mortally wounded.”* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    08/01/2017 01:38:09
    1. [KENTUCKY-LEGENDS] THE KENTUCKY BLUE PEOPLE
    2. Sandi Gorin
    3. *THE KENTUCKY BLUE PEOPLE* *I posted this many years back on another list but it was recently brought to mind.* *There is, along Troublesome Creek in eastern Kentucky, an unusual thing that puzzled scientists for quite some time, and has caused much puzzlement among certain families. Sources are shown at the end of the post if you’d like to read further. The unusual thing? The skins of these families are blue. It all started with one Martin Fugate who settled in this area and brought with him his American bride with flaming red hair. Descendants of Martin all bear a striking resemblance due to the blueness, almost purpleness, of the skin.* *As medical technology grew, so did the search for the cause of this blueness. The condition was blamed on heart trouble, lung disease or some that just thought that in the Fugate’s that their blood vessels were closer to the skin than in the other people. Research began in earnest in the 1960s when a hematologist from the University of Kentucky traveled to Troublesome Creek in an effort to cure them. By this time, there were many, many descendants who carried the blue color. The physician was Madison Cawein and he carried some heavy credentials with him; he had helped isolate an antidote for cholera and had worked on the drug for Parkinson’s disease. He was joined by a nurse in Hazard KY; Ruth Pendergrass, who had been interested in the blue people for some time. Many of their discoveries are shown in the sources below. One lady cited was a Combses who he thought was having a heart attack due to the blueness of her skin and nails; he called for help immediately. Then he met Patrick and Rachel Ritchie in Hazard, again with perfectly blue skin. Thus began the charting of a family tree to see if he could determine the source. He discovered what he thought to be the problem a case of methemoglobinemia! Now I’m sure this word is not in all of our vocabularies but it is a rare hereditary blood disorder that results from excess levels of methemoglobin in the blood. What color is methemoglobin? Blue. It is the œnonfunctional form of the red hemoglobin that carries oxygen.**If you look at your veins, especially in your hands, you will see blue veins just below the skin.* *Well, that was step one. Now what? What was the cause? Several things can trigger this in an individual including œabnormal hemoglobin formation, an enzyme deficiency, taking too much of certain drugs, including vitamin K.**But after testing the Ritchie family, no abnormal hemoglobin was detected. Back to the drawing board. He found a clue in a book entitled the Journal of Clinical Investigation, 1960, which started him towards the solution. E. M. Scott, the author of the above, discovered hereditary methemoglobinemia in Alaskan Eskimos and Indians which he thought was caused by the absence of the enzyme diaphorase from the red blood cells. He felt that the condition was just inherited as a recessive trait. To get this disorder, a person would have to inherit two genes for it, one from each parent. A person with only one gene wouldn’t be blue, but he could pass it to the next generation.* *This led the doctor back to Hazard for more blood tests on the Ritchey’s. This led to their uncle who was also blue. This led to Zach (Big Man) Fugate the family patriarch. He found also Bessie Fugate. His theory was proved by these blood samples. He concluded that if he added methlylene blue as an antidote it would turn the skin back to a normal color. Convincing that adding something blue to someone blue sounded a little strange if they wanted to have pink skin! He had to convince them that their bodies had a way of converting methemoglobin back to normal. * *Cawein and Nurse Pendergrass headed back to the Ritchie’s and gave them 100 milligrams of this methylene blue. It only took a few minutes and the blue was gone from their skin. They were thrilled that for the first time in their lives, they were pink and no longer ashamed or embarrassed! The family only had to take a pill a day from that point to stay a natural skin tone. The pills are only temporary as it is excreted in the urine. * *Well, who started all this? It goes back to Martin Fugate. He was a French orphan who came to Kentucky in 1820 to take a land grant in Perry County. There is no record that he was blue as mentioned in any of the histories of the county, but his family said he was blue. Somehow, the bride he chose with the flaming red hair, carried the same œblue gene.**She had apparently a normal skin tone. After they began married life, they soon had seven children and four had blue skins. The family multiplied rapidly. Fugates married Fugates, sometimes first cousins. And, they married into close neighbors; Combses, Smiths, Ritchies and Stacys. They were pretty well isolated from many other families so kept marrying into each other’s families. Tracing the pedigrees of these families become very complicated with so many intermarriages. One of Martin’s sons, Zachariah, married his mother’s sister and this triggered the lines down to the current generations. * *There is some division of thought on the genealogies of Martin Fugate, but one record is shown below; I cannot verify or disprove it; I have no connection. Some say that Martin Fugate married Elizabeth Smith 8 Oct 1820 and that they had 11 children, not 7 and there is no record they were blue. * *You can check out the questions about the genealogies at * *http://www.people.virginia.edu/~fugcomment.html* <http://www.people.virginia.edu/%7Efugcomment.html>*. Many printed sources were given from technical journals. * *Websites of interest for further information:* *Blue people: **http://www.bergen.org/ACADEMY/Bio/cellbio/cellbio1bluepeople...* <http://www.bergen.org/ACADEMY/Bio/cellbio/cellbio1bluepeople.html>*__* *http://www.people.virginia.edu/%7Erjh9u/kyblues.html** **http://www.oblevins.com/blevins/D0010/G0001062.html**(pedigrees)* *© Copyright 12 Jan 2006, Sandra K. Gorin.* -- Colonel Sandi Gorin - Genelogia Inquistorem Sandi's Publishing site:http://www.gensoup.org/gorin/index.html Genealogy Puzzlers: http://gensoup.org/gorinpuzzles/index.php --- This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software. https://www.avast.com/antivirus

    07/25/2017 01:28:07