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    1. [IRISH-NYC] How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far)
    2. mary pavlovich
    3. I have been fortunate in learning so much about my NY family and although I must be just repeating the obvious, I want to set out which sources have been most helpful. Starting off, rather obviously, *Ancestry *was key. I am fortunate to live near libraries with Ancestry Library edition. I never subscribed , nor used a trial of Ancestry. *Family Search* was also key. *Find My Past* is terrific, and I have subscribed to that a month at a time, including for NYC Roman Catholic records. Beyond NYC, they were instrumental in research across the pond. My family names in NYC were the *McCanns, the Flannigans*. *The McCanns* John, b. County Tyrone 1829 and Mary Hewett b. Glasgow 1825 were married and began their family in Glasgow. They were still there in the 1861 census, but by July of 1863 had emigrated to Brooklyn. I found record of their arrival in the *search function for Castle Garden*. Instead of wading through common names like John or Mary I looked for daughter Esther. *City directories* helped me place laborer John in the vicinity of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Not sure how I decided it was my John, but it was more than a guess.) I assumed, but don't know that John worked in the navy yard. I nearly overlooked a major record. In the *1865 NYS Census*, the McCanns are still there in Brooklyn, but a *check mark in the column asking about military service* led me to interesting knowledge. It seems that John was serving in the US Navy. That sent me over to the naval enlistment records and a physical description. I learned that he served on the USS Shamrock, built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (I wonder if John helped build it). Fun fact: the Shamrock was commissioned on St. Patrick's day in 1864, and launched with a bottle of Irish whisky This was discovered in a newspaper search.* Brooklyn Eagle,* I think, but maybe the *New York Herald*. In the *1870 Census *the family was living in Newark, NJ. John was working as a boatman. They still had a a New York incident however. In August, 1869 an article in the* New York Herald*, tells of John McCann, boatman of Newark, New Jersey being badly beaten by a vagrant on New Chambers Street after refusing to give a vagrant a handout. An all too familiar story in NYC.This let me know that they had moved to Newark, and that he still had reason, maybe work related, maybe personal, to be in NYC sometimes. Two daughters were born in Brooklyn. I have yet to find (or even look hard) for the baptismal records. I have heard that Brooklyn Roman Catholic records will be digitized and online soon. I hope that is correct. I don't recall how I know that daughter Mary was born on March 4, 1868. Ann was my Great-Grandmother. She died in NJ in 1903. *The Flannigans* (also found variants on Flannigan) arrived in NYC in the late 1840s. my 2nd g-grandmother, Susan, was born 1839 (County Down) and was in Manhattan by 1849, along with father Thomas, mother Anne & various siblings. Again Ancestry, Family Search and Find My Past were key resources. I was fortunate to learn of the existence in the NYPL of the records of *St. Peter's RC Church on Barclay St*. This is long before Find My Past published the transcripts for St. Peter's. From those filmstrips I learned of Susan's marriage to Thomas Young, the baptisms of the four children they had while in Manhattan, and the names of sponsors of the events. No family, as far as I can tell, but neighbors on Desbrosses St (where Susan grew up, and Leonard St. where she and Thomas Young lived after their marriage. It was great fun to lunch at the Square Diner, 33 Leonaard St, corner of Varick, the same street address where Susan, Thomas and children lived in the 1860s. I long for the day when St. Peter's images are on Find My Past as well as the transcripts, because the little notes about godparents, witnesses, etc., can be revealing. Not sure there is anything left there for me to find, but you never know. In the records of the *Emigrant Savings Bank* (Ancestry) also, I think in the NYPL) Susan is signatory on an account for Thomas Young, who was illiterate. He worked in a sugar processing plant across the street from his home on Leonard St. From that record I learned that the Flannigans were from County Down. That was a big find for me, although I haven't yet found *where* in County Down. City directories, census records, the standard stuff was also useful. Susan's family used the services of Bellevue Hospital for illness (adult son) and a bad accident.(father). Susan and Thomas had relocated to Jersey City (possibly because a new sugar refinery had opened in JC around that time, maybe because they thought it would be a better atmosphere than lower Manhattan) by the time of the 1870 census, and died there, she in 1874, he in 75. TB, I think. The children were placed in an orphanage St. Mary's in Vailsburg, NJ, now a part of Newark.The orphanage records note that Thomas was in a hospital at some point before his death. Can't figure out which. That is how they came to Newark, to meet the McCann-Young family. Thus ends the NYC part of the family history, except for me who lives in Manhattan now. Anyway, that's my NYC family. My mother always said she had heard of a New York connection. I'm happy to have established it. She also said Mac Dougall St somehow figured in. I'm still working on that. I know most of this is standard stuff, but I thought it might be worthwhile to put it down somewhere. Good luck with your research. I'm still plugging away at some missing details, here and in the Old World. Mary

    11/20/2019 09:17:19
    1. [IRISH-NYC] [EXTERNAL] Re: How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far)
    2. Denise
    3. You have been muck luckier than I have with your Irish roots! Thanks for telling me how you found everything.....my Irish brick wall is my great-great grandparents Patrick Garvin (or Gavin) and Eliza Hodgins......I found their marriage record on FindMyPast...they were married in 1866 in St Paul's church in Manhattan...of course no parents were listed for them.....I do know Eliza's parents but absolutely nothing about Patrick before 1866.....they settled in College Point and raised their family there and he died in 1896.....My other Irish problem is another great-great grandmother Kate McKenna who appears to have just dropped out of the sky and landed in College Point married to Gustov Drebing.....there are a LOT of Kate McKennas who came thru Castle Garden, all around the same ages so there is no way of knowing which is her......they had to have married around 1871 -1873 ....their first child was born in 1873.......but I can not find a marriage for them or I can not locate either one in the 1870 census (and I went page by page for 390 pages for the college point/Flushing area!So I'm hoping as more records are added, something may pop up one of these days! Denise Irwin -----Original Message----- From: mary pavlovich <[email protected]> To: This list is dedicated to the emigration and settlement of people from Ireland to New York City, (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Staten Island) <[email protected]> Sent: Wed, Nov 20, 2019 11:17 am Subject: [IRISH-NYC] How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far) I have been fortunate in learning so much about my NY family and although I must be just repeating the obvious, I want to set out which sources have been most helpful. Starting off, rather obviously,  *Ancestry *was key. I am fortunate to live near libraries with Ancestry Library edition. I never subscribed , nor used a trial of Ancestry. *Family Search* was also key. *Find My Past* is terrific, and I have subscribed to that a month at a time, including for NYC Roman Catholic records. Beyond NYC, they were instrumental in research across the pond. My family names in NYC were the *McCanns, the Flannigans*. *The McCanns* John, b. County Tyrone 1829 and Mary Hewett b. Glasgow 1825 were married and began their family in Glasgow. They were still there in the 1861 census, but by July of 1863 had emigrated to Brooklyn. I found record of their arrival in the *search function  for Castle Garden*. Instead of wading through common names like John or Mary I looked for daughter Esther. *City directories* helped me place laborer John in the vicinity of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Not sure how I decided it was my John, but it was more than a guess.)  I assumed, but don't know that John worked in the navy yard. I nearly overlooked a major record. In the *1865 NYS Census*, the McCanns are still there in Brooklyn, but a *check mark in the column asking about military service* led me to interesting knowledge. It seems that John was serving in the US Navy. That sent me over to the naval enlistment records and a physical description. I learned that he served on the USS Shamrock, built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (I wonder if John helped build it). Fun fact: the Shamrock was commissioned on St. Patrick's day in 1864, and launched with a bottle of Irish whisky This was discovered in a newspaper search.* Brooklyn Eagle,* I think, but maybe the *New York Herald*. In the *1870 Census *the family was living in Newark, NJ. John was working as a boatman. They still had a a New York incident however. In August, 1869 an  article in the* New York Herald*, tells of John McCann, boatman of Newark, New Jersey being badly beaten  by a vagrant on New Chambers Street  after refusing to give a vagrant a handout. An all too familiar story in NYC.This let me know that they had moved to Newark, and that he still had reason, maybe work related, maybe personal, to be in NYC sometimes. Two daughters were born in Brooklyn. I have yet to find (or even look hard) for the baptismal records. I have heard that Brooklyn Roman Catholic records will be digitized and online soon. I hope that is correct. I don't recall how I know that daughter Mary was born on March 4, 1868. Ann was my Great-Grandmother. She died in NJ in 1903. *The Flannigans* (also found variants on Flannigan) arrived in NYC in the late 1840s. my 2nd g-grandmother, Susan, was born 1839 (County Down) and was in Manhattan by 1849, along with father Thomas, mother Anne & various siblings. Again Ancestry, Family Search and Find My Past were key resources.  I was fortunate to learn of the existence in the NYPL of the records of *St. Peter's RC Church on Barclay St*.  This is long before Find My Past published the transcripts for St. Peter's. From those filmstrips I learned of Susan's marriage to Thomas Young, the baptisms of the four children they had while in Manhattan, and the names of sponsors of the events. No family, as far as I can tell, but neighbors on Desbrosses St (where Susan grew up, and Leonard St. where she and Thomas Young lived after their marriage. It was great fun to lunch  at the Square Diner, 33 Leonaard St, corner of Varick, the same street address where Susan, Thomas and children lived in the 1860s. I long for the day when St. Peter's images are on Find My Past as well as the transcripts, because the little notes about godparents, witnesses, etc., can be revealing. Not sure there is anything left there for me to find, but you never know. In the records of the *Emigrant Savings Bank* (Ancestry) also, I think in the NYPL) Susan is signatory on an account for Thomas Young, who was illiterate. He worked in a sugar processing plant across the street from his home on Leonard St. From that record I learned that the Flannigans were from County Down. That was a big find for me, although I haven't yet found *where* in County Down. City directories, census records, the standard stuff was also useful. Susan's family used the services of Bellevue Hospital for illness (adult son) and a bad accident.(father). Susan and Thomas had relocated to Jersey City (possibly because a new sugar refinery had opened in JC around that time, maybe because they thought it would be a better atmosphere than lower Manhattan) by the time of the 1870 census, and died there, she in 1874, he in 75. TB, I think. The children were placed in an orphanage St. Mary's in Vailsburg, NJ, now a part of Newark.The orphanage records note that Thomas was in a hospital at some point before his death. Can't figure out which.  That is how they came to Newark, to meet the McCann-Young family. Thus ends the NYC part of the family history, except for me who lives in Manhattan now. Anyway, that's my NYC family. My mother always said she had heard of a New York connection. I'm happy to have established it. She also said Mac Dougall St somehow figured in. I'm still working on that. I know most of this is standard stuff, but I thought it might be worthwhile to put it down somewhere. Good luck with your research. I'm still plugging away at some missing details, here and in the Old World. Mary _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    11/20/2019 11:57:23
    1. [IRISH-NYC] Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far)
    2. mary pavlovich
    3. Hello Denise, I am assuming that the Ancestry tree for Patrick Garvin and Eliza Hodgins is your tree, is that right? I currently have no access at home to records except for Family Search, so I am rather limited. Did the record of the marriage at St. Paul's include names of witnesses? Did baptismal info for their children include names of sponsors? Did Patrick serve in the military? Did you find a grave site? If so, there a headstone? (I never had any luck with info on headstones over here, many never had a headstone. I did, however, find a mother lode in Aberdeen, which listed names and dates and sometimes cause of death for almost a dozen people.) Do you have arrival info for Patrick? There is a July 31, 1863 arrival in NY with a 21 year old Pat Garvin and coincidentally a 20 Sarah Mc Kenna aboard. A coincidence, or a McKenna-Garvin connection? Did you just do a Google search of the names you are working on? I did that for my 3rd great grandmother's and found that her father had moved to Canada, left his children from his first marriage behind in Ireland and started a second family in Canada. Someone in that second family had posted an entire history of the family. The only missing person from the first family was my 3rd great grandmother! If anything I think might be useful comes to mind I will send it along. Good luck Mary On Wed, Nov 20, 2019 at 1:57 PM Denise via IRISH-NEW-YORK-CITY < [email protected]> wrote: > You have been muck luckier than I have with your Irish roots! Thanks for > telling me how you found everything.....my Irish brick wall is my > great-great grandparents Patrick Garvin (or Gavin) and Eliza Hodgins......I > found their marriage record on FindMyPast...they were married in 1866 in St > Paul's church in Manhattan...of course no parents were listed for > them.....I do know Eliza's parents but absolutely nothing about Patrick > before 1866.....they settled in College Point and raised their family there > and he died in 1896.....My other Irish problem is another great-great > grandmother Kate McKenna who appears to have just dropped out of the sky > and landed in College Point married to Gustov Drebing.....there are a LOT > of Kate McKennas who came thru Castle Garden, all around the same ages so > there is no way of knowing which is her......they had to have married > around 1871 -1873 ....their first child was born in 1873.......but I can > not find a marriage for them or I can not locate either one in the 1870 > census (and I went page by page for 390 pages for the college > point/Flushing area!So I'm hoping as more records are added, something may > pop up one of these days! > Denise Irwin > > -----Original Message----- > From: mary pavlovich <[email protected]> > To: This list is dedicated to the emigration and settlement of people from > Ireland to New York City, (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Staten > Island) <[email protected]> > Sent: Wed, Nov 20, 2019 11:17 am > Subject: [IRISH-NYC] How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far) > > I have been fortunate in learning so much about my NY family and although I > must be just repeating the obvious, I want to set out which sources have > been most helpful. > Starting off, rather obviously, *Ancestry *was key. I am fortunate to live > near libraries with Ancestry Library edition. I never subscribed , nor used > a trial of Ancestry. > *Family Search* was also key. > *Find My Past* is terrific, and I have subscribed to that a month at a > time, including for NYC Roman Catholic records. Beyond NYC, they were > instrumental in research across the pond. > > > My family names in NYC were the *McCanns, the Flannigans*. > *The McCanns* John, b. County Tyrone 1829 and Mary Hewett b. Glasgow 1825 > were married and began their family in Glasgow. They were still there in > the 1861 census, but by July of 1863 had emigrated to Brooklyn. I found > record of their arrival in the *search function for Castle Garden*. > Instead of wading through common names like John or Mary I looked for > daughter Esther. *City directories* helped me place laborer John in the > vicinity of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Not sure how I decided it was my John, > but it was more than a guess.) I assumed, but don't know that John worked > in the navy yard. > I nearly overlooked a major record. In the *1865 NYS Census*, the McCanns > are still there in Brooklyn, but a *check mark in the column asking about > military service* led me to interesting knowledge. It seems that John was > serving in the US Navy. That sent me over to the naval enlistment records > and a physical description. I learned that he served on the USS Shamrock, > built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (I wonder if John helped build it). Fun > fact: the Shamrock was commissioned on St. Patrick's day in 1864, and > launched with a bottle of Irish whisky This was discovered in a newspaper > search.* Brooklyn Eagle,* I think, but maybe the *New York Herald*. > In the *1870 > Census *the family was living in Newark, NJ. John was working as a boatman. > They still had a a New York incident however. In August, 1869 an article > in the* New York Herald*, tells of John McCann, boatman of Newark, New > Jersey being badly beaten by a vagrant on New Chambers Street after > refusing to give a vagrant a handout. An all too familiar story in NYC.This > let me know that they had moved to Newark, and that he still had reason, > maybe work related, maybe personal, to be in NYC sometimes. > Two daughters were born in Brooklyn. I have yet to find (or even look hard) > for the baptismal records. I have heard that Brooklyn Roman Catholic > records will be digitized and online soon. I hope that is correct. I don't > recall how I know that daughter Mary was born on March 4, 1868. Ann was my > Great-Grandmother. She died in NJ in 1903. > > *The Flannigans* (also found variants on Flannigan) arrived in NYC in the > late 1840s. my 2nd g-grandmother, Susan, was born 1839 (County Down) and > was in Manhattan by 1849, along with father Thomas, mother Anne & various > siblings. Again Ancestry, Family Search and Find My Past were key > resources. I was fortunate to learn of the existence in the NYPL of the > records of *St. Peter's RC Church on Barclay St*. This is long before Find > My Past published the transcripts for St. Peter's. From those filmstrips I > learned of Susan's marriage to Thomas Young, the baptisms of the four > children they had while in Manhattan, and the names of sponsors of the > events. No family, as far as I can tell, but neighbors on Desbrosses St > (where Susan grew up, and Leonard St. where she and Thomas Young lived > after their marriage. > It was great fun to lunch at the Square Diner, 33 Leonaard St, corner of > Varick, the same street address where Susan, Thomas and children lived in > the 1860s. > > I long for the day when St. Peter's images are on Find My Past as well as > the transcripts, because the little notes about godparents, witnesses, > etc., > can be revealing. Not sure there is anything left there for me to find, but > you never know. > > In the records of the *Emigrant Savings Bank* (Ancestry) also, I think in > the NYPL) Susan is signatory on an account for Thomas Young, who was > illiterate. He worked in a sugar processing plant across the street from > his home on Leonard St. From that record I learned that the Flannigans were > from County Down. That was a big find for me, although I haven't yet found > *where* in County Down. > City directories, census records, the standard stuff was also useful. > > Susan's family used the services of Bellevue Hospital for illness (adult > son) and a bad accident.(father). > > Susan and Thomas had relocated to Jersey City (possibly because a new > sugar refinery had opened in JC around that time, maybe because they > thought it would be a better atmosphere than lower Manhattan) by the time > of the 1870 census, and died there, she in 1874, he in 75. TB, I think. > The children were placed in an orphanage St. Mary's in Vailsburg, NJ, now a > part of Newark.The orphanage records note that Thomas was in a hospital at > some point before his death. Can't figure out which. That is how they came > to Newark, to meet the McCann-Young family. Thus ends the NYC part of the > family history, except for me who lives in Manhattan now. > > Anyway, that's my NYC family. My mother always said she had heard of a New > York connection. I'm happy to have established it. She also said Mac > Dougall St somehow figured in. I'm still working on that. > > I know most of this is standard stuff, but I thought it might be worthwhile > to put it down somewhere. > > Good luck with your research. I'm still plugging away at some missing > details, here and in the Old World. > > Mary > > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe > https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected]tsweb.com > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: > https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb > community > > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe > https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: > https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb > community >

    11/20/2019 02:01:55
    1. [IRISH-NYC] Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far)
    2. Denise
    3. My main tree is Denise Rae Janer Family Tree....I have a few Patrick Garvin trees but they are just for researching other Patrick Garvin names.....Yes there are witness names on the marriage but neither pans out...also I have witnesses for the baptism certificates of their children....also no luckI know where they are buried (Mt St Mary's cemetery in Flushing)  Can not find the headstone....the office thinks its probably in the oldest part of the cemetery and most of those headstones have fallen over and I didn't have the time to go around and pulll them up...I saw that pat Garvin arrival along with a couple others.....none I can prove however....Thanks for the input!Denise -----Original Message----- From: mary pavlovich <[email protected]> To: This list is dedicated to the emigration and settlement of people from Ireland to New York City, (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Staten Island) <[email protected]> Sent: Wed, Nov 20, 2019 4:02 pm Subject: [IRISH-NYC] Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far) Hello Denise, I am assuming that the Ancestry tree for Patrick Garvin and Eliza Hodgins is your tree, is that right? I currently have no access at home to records except for Family Search, so I am rather limited. Did the record of the marriage at St. Paul's include names of witnesses? Did baptismal info for their children include names of sponsors? Did Patrick serve in the military? Did you find a grave site? If so, there a headstone? (I never had any luck with info on headstones over here, many never had a headstone. I did, however,  find a mother lode in Aberdeen, which listed names and dates  and sometimes cause of death for almost a dozen people.) Do you have arrival info for Patrick? There is a July 31, 1863 arrival in NY with a 21 year old Pat Garvin and coincidentally a 20 Sarah Mc Kenna aboard. A coincidence, or a McKenna-Garvin connection? Did you just do a Google search of the names you are working on? I did that for my 3rd great grandmother's and found that her father had moved to Canada, left his children from his first marriage behind in Ireland and started a second family in Canada. Someone in that second family had posted an entire history of the family. The only missing person from the first family was my 3rd great grandmother! If anything I think might be useful comes to mind I will send it along. Good luck Mary On Wed, Nov 20, 2019 at 1:57 PM Denise via IRISH-NEW-YORK-CITY < [email protected]> wrote: > You have been muck luckier than I have with your Irish roots! Thanks for > telling me how you found everything.....my Irish brick wall is my > great-great grandparents Patrick Garvin (or Gavin) and Eliza Hodgins......I > found their marriage record on FindMyPast...they were married in 1866 in St > Paul's church in Manhattan...of course no parents were listed for > them.....I do know Eliza's parents but absolutely nothing about Patrick > before 1866.....they settled in College Point and raised their family there > and he died in 1896.....My other Irish problem is another great-great > grandmother Kate McKenna who appears to have just dropped out of the sky > and landed in College Point married to Gustov Drebing.....there are a LOT > of Kate McKennas who came thru Castle Garden, all around the same ages so > there is no way of knowing which is her......they had to have married > around 1871 -1873 ....their first child was born in 1873.......but I can > not find a marriage for them or I can not locate either one in the 1870 > census (and I went page by page for 390 pages for the college > point/Flushing area!So I'm hoping as more records are added, something may > pop up one of these days! > Denise Irwin > > -----Original Message----- > From: mary pavlovich <[email protected]> > To: This list is dedicated to the emigration and settlement of people from > Ireland to New York City, (Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, Staten > Island) <[email protected]> > Sent: Wed, Nov 20, 2019 11:17 am > Subject: [IRISH-NYC] How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far) > > I have been fortunate in learning so much about my NY family and although I > must be just repeating the obvious, I want to set out which sources have > been most helpful. > Starting off, rather obviously,  *Ancestry *was key. I am fortunate to live > near libraries with Ancestry Library edition. I never subscribed , nor used > a trial of Ancestry. > *Family Search* was also key. > *Find My Past* is terrific, and I have subscribed to that a month at a > time, including for NYC Roman Catholic records. Beyond NYC, they were > instrumental in research across the pond. > > > My family names in NYC were the *McCanns, the Flannigans*. > *The McCanns* John, b. County Tyrone 1829 and Mary Hewett b. Glasgow 1825 > were married and began their family in Glasgow. They were still there in > the 1861 census, but by July of 1863 had emigrated to Brooklyn. I found > record of their arrival in the *search function  for Castle Garden*. > Instead of wading through common names like John or Mary I looked for > daughter Esther. *City directories* helped me place laborer John in the > vicinity of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Not sure how I decided it was my John, > but it was more than a guess.)  I assumed, but don't know that John worked > in the navy yard. > I nearly overlooked a major record. In the *1865 NYS Census*, the McCanns > are still there in Brooklyn, but a *check mark in the column asking about > military service* led me to interesting knowledge. It seems that John was > serving in the US Navy. That sent me over to the naval enlistment records > and a physical description. I learned that he served on the USS Shamrock, > built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (I wonder if John helped build it). Fun > fact: the Shamrock was commissioned on St. Patrick's day in 1864, and > launched with a bottle of Irish whisky This was discovered in a newspaper > search.* Brooklyn Eagle,* I think, but maybe the *New York Herald*. > In the *1870 > Census *the family was living in Newark, NJ. John was working as a boatman. > They still had a a New York incident however. In August, 1869 an  article > in the* New York Herald*, tells of John McCann, boatman of Newark, New > Jersey being badly beaten  by a vagrant on New Chambers Street  after > refusing to give a vagrant a handout. An all too familiar story in NYC.This > let me know that they had moved to Newark, and that he still had reason, > maybe work related, maybe personal, to be in NYC sometimes. > Two daughters were born in Brooklyn. I have yet to find (or even look hard) > for the baptismal records. I have heard that Brooklyn Roman Catholic > records will be digitized and online soon. I hope that is correct. I don't > recall how I know that daughter Mary was born on March 4, 1868. Ann was my > Great-Grandmother. She died in NJ in 1903. > > *The Flannigans* (also found variants on Flannigan) arrived in NYC in the > late 1840s. my 2nd g-grandmother, Susan, was born 1839 (County Down) and > was in Manhattan by 1849, along with father Thomas, mother Anne & various > siblings. Again Ancestry, Family Search and Find My Past were key > resources.  I was fortunate to learn of the existence in the NYPL of the > records of *St. Peter's RC Church on Barclay St*.  This is long before Find > My Past published the transcripts for St. Peter's. From those filmstrips I > learned of Susan's marriage to Thomas Young, the baptisms of the four > children they had while in Manhattan, and the names of sponsors of the > events. No family, as far as I can tell, but neighbors on Desbrosses St > (where Susan grew up, and Leonard St. where she and Thomas Young lived > after their marriage. > It was great fun to lunch  at the Square Diner, 33 Leonaard St, corner of > Varick, the same street address where Susan, Thomas and children lived in > the 1860s. > > I long for the day when St. Peter's images are on Find My Past as well as > the transcripts, because the little notes about godparents, witnesses, > etc., > can be revealing. Not sure there is anything left there for me to find, but > you never know. > > In the records of the *Emigrant Savings Bank* (Ancestry) also, I think in > the NYPL) Susan is signatory on an account for Thomas Young, who was > illiterate. He worked in a sugar processing plant across the street from > his home on Leonard St. From that record I learned that the Flannigans were > from County Down. That was a big find for me, although I haven't yet found > *where* in County Down. > City directories, census records, the standard stuff was also useful. > > Susan's family used the services of Bellevue Hospital for illness (adult > son) and a bad accident.(father). > > Susan and Thomas had relocated to Jersey City (possibly because a new > sugar refinery had opened in JC around that time, maybe because they > thought it would be a better atmosphere than lower Manhattan) by the time > of the 1870 census, and died there, she in 1874, he in 75. TB, I think. > The children were placed in an orphanage St. Mary's in Vailsburg, NJ, now a > part of Newark.The orphanage records note that Thomas was in a hospital at > some point before his death. Can't figure out which.  That is how they came > to Newark, to meet the McCann-Young family. Thus ends the NYC part of the > family history, except for me who lives in Manhattan now. > > Anyway, that's my NYC family. My mother always said she had heard of a New > York connection. I'm happy to have established it. She also said Mac > Dougall St somehow figured in. I'm still working on that. > > I know most of this is standard stuff, but I thought it might be worthwhile > to put it down somewhere. > > Good luck with your research. I'm still plugging away at some missing > details, here and in the Old World. > > Mary > > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe > https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: > https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb > community > > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe > https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: > https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb > community > _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    11/20/2019 06:56:46
    1. [IRISH-NYC] [EXTERNAL] Re: How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far)
    2. Gloria Bartosik
    3. McCanns were in Manhattan but I have little info on them.My ancestor was Mary Walsh who married a Mcann . know little In a message dated 11/20/2019 11:17:53 AM Eastern Standard Time, [email protected] writes: I have been fortunate in learning so much about my NY family and although Imust be just repeating the obvious, I want to set out which sources havebeen most helpful.Starting off, rather obviously,  *Ancestry *was key. I am fortunate to livenear libraries with Ancestry Library edition. I never subscribed , nor useda trial of Ancestry.*Family Search* was also key.*Find My Past* is terrific, and I have subscribed to that a month at atime, including for NYC Roman Catholic records. Beyond NYC, they wereinstrumental in research across the pond. My family names in NYC were the *McCanns, the Flannigans*.*The McCanns* John, b. County Tyrone 1829 and Mary Hewett b. Glasgow 1825were married and began their family in Glasgow. They were still there inthe 1861 census, but by July of 1863 had emigrated to Brooklyn. I foundrecord of their arrival in the *search function  for Castle Garden*.Instead of wading through common names like John or Mary I looked fordaughter Esther. *City directories* helped me place laborer John in thevicinity of the Brooklyn Navy Yard. (Not sure how I decided it was my John,but it was more than a guess.)  I assumed, but don't know that John workedin the navy yard.I nearly overlooked a major record. In the *1865 NYS Census*, the McCannsare still there in Brooklyn, but a *check mark in the column asking aboutmilitary service* led me to interesting knowledge. It seems that John wasserving in the US Navy. That sent me over to the naval enlistment recordsand a physical description. I learned that he served on the USS Shamrock,built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (I wonder if John helped build it). Funfact: the Shamrock was commissioned on St. Patrick's day in 1864, andlaunched with a bottle of Irish whisky This was discovered in a newspapersearch.* Brooklyn Eagle,* I think, but maybe the *New York Herald*.In the *1870Census *the family was living in Newark, NJ. John was working as a boatman.They still had a a New York incident however. In August, 1869 an  articlein the* New York Herald*, tells of John McCann, boatman of Newark, NewJersey being badly beaten  by a vagrant on New Chambers Street  afterrefusing to give a vagrant a handout. An all too familiar story in NYC.Thislet me know that they had moved to Newark, and that he still had reason,maybe work related, maybe personal, to be in NYC sometimes.Two daughters were born in Brooklyn. I have yet to find (or even look hard)for the baptismal records. I have heard that Brooklyn Roman Catholicrecords will be digitized and online soon. I hope that is correct. I don'trecall how I know that daughter Mary was born on March 4, 1868. Ann was myGreat-Grandmother. She died in NJ in 1903. *The Flannigans* (also found variants on Flannigan) arrived in NYC in thelate 1840s. my 2nd g-grandmother, Susan, was born 1839 (County Down) andwas in Manhattan by 1849, along with father Thomas, mother Anne & varioussiblings. Again Ancestry, Family Search and Find My Past were keyresources.  I was fortunate to learn of the existence in the NYPL of therecords of *St. Peter's RC Church on Barclay St*.  This is long before FindMy Past published the transcripts for St. Peter's. From those filmstrips Ilearned of Susan's marriage to Thomas Young, the baptisms of the fourchildren they had while in Manhattan, and the names of sponsors of theevents. No family, as far as I can tell, but neighbors on Desbrosses St(where Susan grew up, and Leonard St. where she and Thomas Young livedafter their marriage.It was great fun to lunch  at the Square Diner, 33 Leonaard St, corner ofVarick, the same street address where Susan, Thomas and children lived inthe 1860s. I long for the day when St. Peter's images are on Find My Past as well asthe transcripts, because the little notes about godparents, witnesses, etc.,can be revealing. Not sure there is anything left there for me to find, butyou never know. In the records of the *Emigrant Savings Bank* (Ancestry) also, I think inthe NYPL) Susan is signatory on an account for Thomas Young, who wasilliterate. He worked in a sugar processing plant across the street fromhis home on Leonard St. From that record I learned that the Flannigans werefrom County Down. That was a big find for me, although I haven't yet found*where* in County Down.City directories, census records, the standard stuff was also useful. Susan's family used the services of Bellevue Hospital for illness (adultson) and a bad accident.(father). Susan and Thomas had relocated to Jersey City (possibly because a newsugar refinery had opened in JC around that time, maybe because theythought it would be a better atmosphere than lower Manhattan) by the timeof the 1870 census, and died there, she in 1874, he in 75. TB, I think.The children were placed in an orphanage St. Mary's in Vailsburg, NJ, now apart of Newark.The orphanage records note that Thomas was in a hospital atsome point before his death. Can't figure out which.  That is how they cameto Newark, to meet the McCann-Young family. Thus ends the NYC part of thefamily history, except for me who lives in Manhattan now. Anyway, that's my NYC family. My mother always said she had heard of a NewYork connection. I'm happy to have established it. She also said MacDougall St somehow figured in. I'm still working on that. I know most of this is standard stuff, but I thought it might be worthwhileto put it down somewhere. Good luck with your research. I'm still plugging away at some missingdetails, here and in the Old World. Mary _______________________________________________Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebprefUnsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blogRootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    11/20/2019 06:33:38
    1. [IRISH-NYC] Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: How I Found my Family (as much as I have, thus far)
    2. mary pavlovich
    3. Don't think any of my McCanns had a Walsh connection. On Wed, Nov 20, 2019 at 8:33 PM Gloria Bartosik via IRISH-NEW-YORK-CITY < [email protected]> wrote: > McCanns were in Manhattan but I have little info on them.My ancestor was > Mary Walsh who married a Mcann . know little > In a message dated 11/20/2019 11:17:53 AM Eastern Standard Time, > [email protected] writes: > > I have been fortunate in learning so much about my NY family and although > Imust be just repeating the obvious, I want to set out which sources > havebeen most helpful.Starting off, rather obviously, *Ancestry *was key. > I am fortunate to livenear libraries with Ancestry Library edition. I never > subscribed , nor useda trial of Ancestry.*Family Search* was also key.*Find > My Past* is terrific, and I have subscribed to that a month at atime, > including for NYC Roman Catholic records. Beyond NYC, they wereinstrumental > in research across the pond. > > My family names in NYC were the *McCanns, the Flannigans*.*The McCanns* > John, b. County Tyrone 1829 and Mary Hewett b. Glasgow 1825were married and > began their family in Glasgow. They were still there inthe 1861 census, but > by July of 1863 had emigrated to Brooklyn. I foundrecord of their arrival > in the *search function for Castle Garden*.Instead of wading through > common names like John or Mary I looked fordaughter Esther. *City > directories* helped me place laborer John in thevicinity of the Brooklyn > Navy Yard. (Not sure how I decided it was my John,but it was more than a > guess.) I assumed, but don't know that John workedin the navy yard.I > nearly overlooked a major record. In the *1865 NYS Census*, the McCannsare > still there in Brooklyn, but a *check mark in the column asking > aboutmilitary service* led me to interesting knowledge. It seems that John > wasserving in the US Navy. That sent me over to the naval enlistment > recordsand a physical description. I learned that he served on the USS > Shamrock,built in the Brooklyn Navy Yard (I wonder if John helped build > it). Funfact: the Shamrock was commissioned on St. Patrick's day in 1864, > andlaunched with a bottle of Irish whisky This was discovered in a > newspapersearch.* Brooklyn Eagle,* I think, but maybe the *New York > Herald*.In the *1870Census *the family was living in Newark, NJ. John was > working as a boatman.They still had a a New York incident however. In > August, 1869 an articlein the* New York Herald*, tells of John McCann, > boatman of Newark, NewJersey being badly beaten by a vagrant on New > Chambers Street afterrefusing to give a vagrant a handout. An all too > familiar story in NYC.Thislet me know that they had moved to Newark, and > that he still had reason,maybe work related, maybe personal, to be in NYC > sometimes.Two daughters were born in Brooklyn. I have yet to find (or even > look hard)for the baptismal records. I have heard that Brooklyn Roman > Catholicrecords will be digitized and online soon. I hope that is correct. > I don'trecall how I know that daughter Mary was born on March 4, 1868. Ann > was myGreat-Grandmother. She died in NJ in 1903. > *The Flannigans* (also found variants on Flannigan) arrived in NYC in > thelate 1840s. my 2nd g-grandmother, Susan, was born 1839 (County Down) > andwas in Manhattan by 1849, along with father Thomas, mother Anne & > varioussiblings. Again Ancestry, Family Search and Find My Past were > keyresources. I was fortunate to learn of the existence in the NYPL of > therecords of *St. Peter's RC Church on Barclay St*. This is long before > FindMy Past published the transcripts for St. Peter's. From those > filmstrips Ilearned of Susan's marriage to Thomas Young, the baptisms of > the fourchildren they had while in Manhattan, and the names of sponsors of > theevents. No family, as far as I can tell, but neighbors on Desbrosses > St(where Susan grew up, and Leonard St. where she and Thomas Young > livedafter their marriage.It was great fun to lunch at the Square Diner, > 33 Leonaard St, corner ofVarick, the same street address where Susan, > Thomas and children lived inthe 1860s. > I long for the day when St. Peter's images are on Find My Past as well > asthe transcripts, because the little notes about godparents, witnesses, > etc.,can be revealing. Not sure there is anything left there for me to > find, butyou never know. > In the records of the *Emigrant Savings Bank* (Ancestry) also, I think > inthe NYPL) Susan is signatory on an account for Thomas Young, who > wasilliterate. He worked in a sugar processing plant across the street > fromhis home on Leonard St. From that record I learned that the Flannigans > werefrom County Down. That was a big find for me, although I haven't yet > found*where* in County Down.City directories, census records, the standard > stuff was also useful. > Susan's family used the services of Bellevue Hospital for illness > (adultson) and a bad accident.(father). > Susan and Thomas had relocated to Jersey City (possibly because a newsugar > refinery had opened in JC around that time, maybe because theythought it > would be a better atmosphere than lower Manhattan) by the timeof the 1870 > census, and died there, she in 1874, he in 75. TB, I think.The children > were placed in an orphanage St. Mary's in Vailsburg, NJ, now apart of > Newark.The orphanage records note that Thomas was in a hospital atsome > point before his death. Can't figure out which. That is how they cameto > Newark, to meet the McCann-Young family. Thus ends the NYC part of > thefamily history, except for me who lives in Manhattan now. > Anyway, that's my NYC family. My mother always said she had heard of a > NewYork connection. I'm happy to have established it. She also said > MacDougall St somehow figured in. I'm still working on that. > I know most of this is standard stuff, but I thought it might be > worthwhileto put it down somewhere. > Good luck with your research. I'm still plugging away at some > missingdetails, here and in the Old World. > Mary > _______________________________________________Email preferences: > http://bit.ly/rootswebprefUnsubscribe > https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] > Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: > https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blogRootsWeb is > funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community > > _______________________________________________ > Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref > Unsubscribe > https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] > Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: > https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 > Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog > RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb > community >

    11/21/2019 05:45:17