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    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Looking For Information - Mary L. (Bishop) (Ingram) (Frady)
    2. Betsy Emhuff via
    3. Here is a timeline for one of my ancestors. I am wanting more information on her. I would like help in finding an obit for her. Since she was living in Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa, in 1930,, and I can't find her after 1930 she probably died in Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa; however, I might be totally wrong about that. Why can't I find her in the 1870 census? I am also totally confused about her June 24, 1902, marriage to John F. or John J. Frady. Why does one marriage list her as Lametra Ingram, and the other one Mary L. Bishop? How come she went by Ingram instead of Frady after marrying Mr. Friday. Any help with these questions, would really be appreciate. Here is the timeline: TIMELINE MARY LAMETRA (LETTIE OR METTIE) BISHOP Parents: Elizabeth Huff/M. Huff/Emhuff and John Wesley Bishop Born: Between 1855-1859 in Illinois - 1860 Census=b. About 1855 in Illinois; 1880 census=b. About 1859 in Illinois; 1885 Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925=b. About 1858 in Illinois; 1920 Iowa Census=b. About 1859 in Illinois; 1930 Census=b. About 1858 in Illinois. Since I figured in her first marriage based on her age that she was born about 1854, and the second marriage says she was born about 1855, I am going to say that she was born between 1854 and 1855 in Illinois, (probably Rock Island County, Port Byron, Illinois). 1860 Census: Lists her as Mary Bishop, was 5 years old, born about 1855, in Illinois, was living in Coe, Rock Island County, Illinois, and was in the household with Oliver McCutcheon and family. The Oliver McCutcheon family is on page 6. On page 9 of this census in Coe, Rock Island County, Illinois, there is a J. Bishop who is 6 years old, and is living with Samuel Allen and family. John Bishop was an older brother of Mary Bishop. Samuel Allen was a brother to John and Mary's grandmother, Highla/Hila (Allen) Emhuff. 1880 Census: Lists her as Mary Bishop, was 21 years old, born about 1859 in Illinois,, was living in Pleasant Valley, Scott, Iowa, and was a servant for the Churchill family, (Joseph and Delia), which were the neighbors of her half sister June's father-in-law, George R. Allen. March 16, 1882: Mary Metti/Mettie Bishop married Ira S. Ingrum in Fayette County, Iowa, Scott Township, at the Centre Grove Church. According to the marriage record it says that Mary Mettie will be 29 her next birthday, which tells me when they got married she was 28, so that would make her birth year about 1854, and she was born in Port Byron, Illinois/Rock Island, Illinois. Her parents were John W. Bishop and Elizabeth M. Huff. According to the marriage record, Ira will be 41 his next birthday, which tells me he was 40 when they got married, so that would make his birth year about 1842, and he was born in New York. Ira's parents were Cyrus, and ? Marshall. The date of the marriage return was March 20, 1882, and it says they registered March 25, 1882. (This makes no sense to me since they got married on March 16th.) This information comes from the Iowa, Marriage Records, 1880-1937,www.ancestry.com 1885 Iowa, State Census Collection, 1836-1925 – Scott, Davenport, Precinct 1: Lists her as Etta Ingram, was 27 years old, was born about 1858 in Illinois, and was divorced. She was in the household with her sister and brother-in-law, Jacob Miller and Lilly. Jacob Miller was 76 years old, and was born about 1806 in Ohio, and Lilly, (also known as Hila or Lila), was 35 years old, and was born about 1850 in Illinois. 1896 – U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 – Davenport, Iowa, City Directory: Lists her as Mrs. Mary L. Ingram, said she was domestic, (guessing that this was her occupation then), and she lived on Camp McClellan Road. 1898 – U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 – Davenport, Iowa, City Directory: Lists her as Mary L. Ingram, said she was domestic, (guessing that this was her occupation then), and lived at 119 W. 16th. June 24, 1902: Found several marriages here for Mary. Iowa, Select Marriages Index, 1758-1996 (www.ancestry.com ) – Lametra Ingram married John F. Frady in Davenport, Scott, Iowa. (Not much information here.) Iowa, Marriage Records, 1880-1837 (www.ancestry.com ) – Got a hit for Lanetta Ingram [Lanetta Bishop] who married John J. Frady on June 24, 1902, in Scott County, Iowa; however, I couldn't find that on the register. Said her parents were John Bishop and Eliz Enhoff. I found a marriage of John J. Frady to Stella Sprague on July 12, 1902, in Davenport, Scott County, Iowa. John's parents were Merritt Frady and Mary Lewis, he was born about 1856, in Bloomfield, Iowa. Iowa, Select Marriages Index, 1758-1996 (www.ancestry.com ) – Mary L. Bishop married John F. Frady on June 24, 1902, in Davenport, Iowa. She was widowed. She was born about 1855 in Fort Byron, Illinois. Mary's parents were John Bishop and Elizabeth M. Huff. John's parents were Merritt Frady and Mary Lewis, he was born about 1856, in Bloomfield, Iowa. 1913 U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 – Davenport, Iowa, City Directory: Lists her as Mary Ingram, (widow of Ira S.), bds, (I am guessing this was her occupation), lived at 119 W. 16th Street. 1915 Iowa, State Census Collections, 1836-1925 – Davenport, Scott, Iowa: Lists her as Mary L. Ingram, was a widow, she was a housekeeper, she was born in Illinois, (doesn't give a year), was living at 119 W. 16th Street, and was living with her half sister June Concannon). 1919 U.S. City Directories, 1822-1995 – Iowa City, Iowa, City Directory: Lists her as Mary L. Ingram, (widow of Ira S.), bds, (I am guessing this was her occupation), lived at 920 Webster. 1920 Iowa Census – Iowa City Ward 5, Johnson, Iowa: The image lists her as Mary Ingrain, and the transcribed record lists her as Mary Ingram. She was born about 1859, in Illinois and was 61 years old. She was widowed, and was a lodger with Oral and Sophia Fowler. The family lived on Webster Street. Lists both her father and her mother being born in Indiana. 1925 Iowa, State Census Collections, 1836-1925 – Iowa City Ward 4, Johnson, Iowa: The image lists her as May L. Ingram, and the transcribed record lists her as May L. Bishop. She was born about 1856, in Illinois, and was 69 years old. She was widowed, and she was a roomer in the household of E. B. Fackler, (could be O. B.), and family. Her parents were John Bishop who was born in Indiana, and Elibzett Imheuff who was born in Indiana. It also says John and Elibzett were married in Indiana. 1930 Census – Iowa City, Johnson, Iowa: The image to me looks like Mary L. Ingram; however, the transcribed record lists her as Mary L. Maram. She was born about 1858, in Illinois, and was 72 years old. This census says she was divorced. She was a lodger in the household of Bruce E. Fackler and family. It also lists both of her parents being born in Indiana. The 1930 census Mary was in was taken April 8, 1930. Since she doesn't appear after 1930, I would say she died after April 8, 1930. I also would say that more than likely she passed away in Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa. Thank you very much! Betsy Emhuff betsyemhuff6010@gmail.com (812) 430-1950

    07/21/2016 10:21:57
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Testing
    2. Don Woodley
    3. Just checking Don Woodley RAOGK for Bremer, Butler, Floyd and Franklin Counties in Iowa. Researching Woodley, Butler, Ayers, Trindle, Cornford, Relf, Lingenfelter and others as time permits.

    12/20/2012 03:46:38
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Testing
    2. Gayle Struska
    3. I am Researching Page Co and Adair Co IA and the migrating trail to NE down to Furnas Co NE, I am researching the Baldwin and Brown families. Any ideas where to research there and online would be helpful. Gayle Baldwin Struska gstruska@twecwb.com -Gayle ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    12/20/2012 02:12:04
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Early Roads out of McGregor
    2. Iris Mendell Miller
    3. I'm going to jump in here. Three generation of my ancestors (Frey/Fry's and Wilson's) landed at McGregor Landing April of 1850 and later my 2nd great-uncle Henry Fry had the Fry Hotel also known as the five-mile house on Stagecoach Road (also know as the "The Whiskey Trail") in Grand Meadow Township between McGregor and Clermont. If I remember right The Fry land was about a couple of miles N/W of Gunter, IA. I have a copy of this story in "GUNDER and SURROUNDING AREA HISTORY and HERITAGE". Iris irismm@kc.rr.com ----- Original Message ----- From: "McGregor Public Library" <mplib@mchsi.com> To: <IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS@rootsweb.com> Sent: Tuesday, April 27, 2010 12:13 PM Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Early Roads out of McGregor There are descriptions of early roads leading out of McGregor, from Alexander MacGregor's Landing. The roads were called : a.. Coulee de Sioux b.. The McGregor Trail c.. The Old Stage Road d.. the Upper Ferry Road e.. the Military Road I am unsure at this time whether these roads were all the same road, called by different names at different times, or that some names designate other roads. Did Alexander MacGregor establish a different road other than the Military Road? There is a lot to be found in the Giard Township History by Marian Beimfohr about the Military Road. Coulee de Sioux (French name for the celebrated Indian trail) McGregor Times - 1856: "Coulee de Sioux is the old French name of the ravine or road that leads westward from McGregor. It was once a celebrated Indian trail and from its gradual rise and subsequent facilities of surmounting the bluffs of the Mississippi on a westward march, it was established by the government as the best means of access from the east banks of the river to their more western fortifications." (p101, Giard Township History, Marian Beimfohr) Upper Ferry Road and McGregor Road "In May, 1840, the Government leased of Alexander MacGregor and of Thomas P. Burnett, of Prairie du Chien, grounds for warehouse purposes at this point, and during the same season a warehouse was erected at the foot of what is now Main street. Considerable opposition was made to McGregor by the agent of the American Fur Company, who succeeded in getting the soldiers to make a road through the northern part of township 95, by furnishing them with whiskey while at work, and carriages for the officers to ride in, without any order for such work from Washington. The road was known as the Upper Ferry Road, and made a junction with the McGregor Road at Monona." History of Clayton County, Iowa - 1882 Chapter XXXV Mendon Township "McGregor's Landing, as it then was called, bacame an important point. A Mission Station was also established that year about four miles below the Fort. -- There was considerable opposition made to McGregor by the American Fur Company, who succeeded in getting the soldiers to make the road through the northern side of township 95, by furnishing whiskey to the soldiers while at work, and carriages for the officers to ride out in -- without any order for such work from the Department at Washington. The road was known as the upper ferry road, and made a junction with the McGregor road, at Monona." Iowa State Gazetteer 1865 Clayton county http://www.sharylscabin.com/Clayton/1882/chapter_XXXV.htm On the Military Road "There were two taverns or inns on the Military Road west of the village of Giard, in Giard Township. We hear first of the Elkhorn from an ad in a newspaper dated 1850: "The Elkhorn Hotel, where travelers meet and relax. Wonderful food is served here, The hearty fare that travelers need. Where the best drinks are served. Excellent beds. Barns, feed and water for livestock. All stages on the Military Road stop here. Reynolds, Prop." The editor of a local newspaper wrote in 1861 that he met 300 teams going each way in the 14-mile trip from McGregor to Monona. .Reynolds is building a tavern stand of his own beyond the Elkhorn on what was once called by the Indians "Thunder Hill" (This was the E.G. Collins farm, later owned by Dennis Grove, in Section 18 "Clayton County Courthouse records have references to the Military Road, and locate it south of Bloody Run. Here are some descriptions of land that mention the Military Road: A) N ½ of the S.E. ¼ and the NE SW ¼ and that part of S ½ N in Section 33 in Giard Township that lies south of the Monona and Ft. Atkinson Road. Dated 3rd Monday in May 1867 B) S ½ of the NE ¼ and across the E end of the N ½ of the SE ¼ by the center of the highway leading to McGregor known as the Military Road C) SW ¼ of the NE ¼ in Section 33 being on the north side of the Ft. Atkinson Road in Clayton County, Date Sept. 5, 1854" (p101, Giard Township History, Marian Beimfohr) Waterloo: "A prairie trail, fringed all summer with wild flowers, crossed to the northwest thru leagues of native meadows, separated into two branches when it reached the edge of the Big Woods, so-titled by the Indians. One track followed along the southern edge of the timber, continuing westward thru Janesville to Waverly, while the other went north thru Jefferson, an early-day mecca for travelers, now known as Denver, thence west to Waverly; then passed northwesterly along the densely timbered banks of the Cedar river. This road in pioneer days was a much-traveled route, traces of which are yet to be found on or near the Rodgers, Whitney, Blake, Biller, Welstead and other homesteads of early days. Near Blakeville this stage road was crossed by the Waterloo-McGregor trail often traveled by the Indians." ~Waterloo Daily Courier, March 15, 1937 McGregor Trail Finally, with the establishing of Hope Martin Park on either side of Fletcher Avenue, the Waterloo Park Department has begun the development of a unique recreation and historical interest area. Such a site is particularly appropriate because the park joins with the old McGregor Trail and a marker on a stone near the intersection of Fletcher and Summit Avenues indicates that fact: The trail was a wagon route which passed through Waterloo and merged at Independence, Mo., with the Oregon Trail. On the banks of Black Hawk Creek the wagon trains stopped for water while the pioneers made their way across Iowa to the far west. ~Waterloo Daily Courier, July 17, 1966 Michelle Pettit Library Director McGregor Public Library 334 Main Street McGregor, Iowa 52157 www.mcgregor.lib.ia.us ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    04/27/2010 08:10:40
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Early Roads out of McGregor
    2. McGregor Public Library
    3. There are descriptions of early roads leading out of McGregor, from Alexander MacGregor's Landing. The roads were called : a.. Coulee de Sioux b.. The McGregor Trail c.. The Old Stage Road d.. the Upper Ferry Road e.. the Military Road I am unsure at this time whether these roads were all the same road, called by different names at different times, or that some names designate other roads. Did Alexander MacGregor establish a different road other than the Military Road? There is a lot to be found in the Giard Township History by Marian Beimfohr about the Military Road. Coulee de Sioux (French name for the celebrated Indian trail) McGregor Times - 1856: "Coulee de Sioux is the old French name of the ravine or road that leads westward from McGregor. It was once a celebrated Indian trail and from its gradual rise and subsequent facilities of surmounting the bluffs of the Mississippi on a westward march, it was established by the government as the best means of access from the east banks of the river to their more western fortifications." (p101, Giard Township History, Marian Beimfohr) Upper Ferry Road and McGregor Road "In May, 1840, the Government leased of Alexander MacGregor and of Thomas P. Burnett, of Prairie du Chien, grounds for warehouse purposes at this point, and during the same season a warehouse was erected at the foot of what is now Main street. Considerable opposition was made to McGregor by the agent of the American Fur Company, who succeeded in getting the soldiers to make a road through the northern part of township 95, by furnishing them with whiskey while at work, and carriages for the officers to ride in, without any order for such work from Washington. The road was known as the Upper Ferry Road, and made a junction with the McGregor Road at Monona." History of Clayton County, Iowa - 1882 Chapter XXXV Mendon Township "McGregor's Landing, as it then was called, bacame an important point. A Mission Station was also established that year about four miles below the Fort. -- There was considerable opposition made to McGregor by the American Fur Company, who succeeded in getting the soldiers to make the road through the northern side of township 95, by furnishing whiskey to the soldiers while at work, and carriages for the officers to ride out in -- without any order for such work from the Department at Washington. The road was known as the upper ferry road, and made a junction with the McGregor road, at Monona." Iowa State Gazetteer 1865 Clayton county http://www.sharylscabin.com/Clayton/1882/chapter_XXXV.htm On the Military Road "There were two taverns or inns on the Military Road west of the village of Giard, in Giard Township. We hear first of the Elkhorn from an ad in a newspaper dated 1850: "The Elkhorn Hotel, where travelers meet and relax. Wonderful food is served here, The hearty fare that travelers need. Where the best drinks are served. Excellent beds. Barns, feed and water for livestock. All stages on the Military Road stop here. Reynolds, Prop." The editor of a local newspaper wrote in 1861 that he met 300 teams going each way in the 14-mile trip from McGregor to Monona. .Reynolds is building a tavern stand of his own beyond the Elkhorn on what was once called by the Indians "Thunder Hill" (This was the E.G. Collins farm, later owned by Dennis Grove, in Section 18 "Clayton County Courthouse records have references to the Military Road, and locate it south of Bloody Run. Here are some descriptions of land that mention the Military Road: A) N ½ of the S.E. ¼ and the NE SW ¼ and that part of S ½ N in Section 33 in Giard Township that lies south of the Monona and Ft. Atkinson Road. Dated 3rd Monday in May 1867 B) S ½ of the NE ¼ and across the E end of the N ½ of the SE ¼ by the center of the highway leading to McGregor known as the Military Road C) SW ¼ of the NE ¼ in Section 33 being on the north side of the Ft. Atkinson Road in Clayton County, Date Sept. 5, 1854" (p101, Giard Township History, Marian Beimfohr) Waterloo: "A prairie trail, fringed all summer with wild flowers, crossed to the northwest thru leagues of native meadows, separated into two branches when it reached the edge of the Big Woods, so-titled by the Indians. One track followed along the southern edge of the timber, continuing westward thru Janesville to Waverly, while the other went north thru Jefferson, an early-day mecca for travelers, now known as Denver, thence west to Waverly; then passed northwesterly along the densely timbered banks of the Cedar river. This road in pioneer days was a much-traveled route, traces of which are yet to be found on or near the Rodgers, Whitney, Blake, Biller, Welstead and other homesteads of early days. Near Blakeville this stage road was crossed by the Waterloo-McGregor trail often traveled by the Indians." ~Waterloo Daily Courier, March 15, 1937 McGregor Trail Finally, with the establishing of Hope Martin Park on either side of Fletcher Avenue, the Waterloo Park Department has begun the development of a unique recreation and historical interest area. Such a site is particularly appropriate because the park joins with the old McGregor Trail and a marker on a stone near the intersection of Fletcher and Summit Avenues indicates that fact: The trail was a wagon route which passed through Waterloo and merged at Independence, Mo., with the Oregon Trail. On the banks of Black Hawk Creek the wagon trains stopped for water while the pioneers made their way across Iowa to the far west. ~Waterloo Daily Courier, July 17, 1966 Michelle Pettit Library Director McGregor Public Library 334 Main Street McGregor, Iowa 52157 www.mcgregor.lib.ia.us

    04/27/2010 06:13:44
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] McGregor Trail
    2. McGregor Public Library
    3. --Looking for information about "The McGregor Trail" McGregor, Iowa was established as McGregor's Landing -- a Mississippi River crossing for pioneers heading west -- we lack information about the route pioneers took once they crossed the river -- but the article below gives a glimpse of it. Probably the old route (in McGregor) from the river would have been up Giard Avenue -- (Methodist Hollow) --then across Iowa (would love to see the route marked out somewhere) What do you recommend for me to locate information on this? Thank you --Michelle, McGregor Public Library McGregor Trail soon to be marked by Waterloo man Waterloo - Where once the wheels of pioneers' prairie schooners cut ruts in the soft, virgin soil, there will be emplanted in the earth at Sunnyside Country Club, a bronze marker, 12 by 22 inches, pointing out the old McGregor Trail. The ruts that were part of the old trail are still existent after nearly 90 years and plainly visible across part of the Sunnyside course, as the land there has never been touched by a plow. The ruts are about a foot deep. The old trail led from McGregor, where there was a crossing from Prairie du Chien and the Wisconsin country, southwest past Fort Atkinson to Prairie Rapids Crossing (now Waterloo), a good ford across the Cedar and then on to Des Moines and Independence, Kansas, where it connected with the more renowned Oregon trail to the Pacific northwest. The marker, which is dedicated to the memory of the late George E. Lichty, resident of Black Hawk county since an early day, has been completed by the Art Bronze company here and will be placed under direction of Burr G. and Robert Lichty, sons of George E. Lichty. Inscription on the marker reads: "This tablet marks the wagon ruts of the McGregor Trail, one of the tributaries to the old Oregon trail in the westward movement which began in 1848. Erected to the memory of George E. Lichty, who interested himself and others in preserving this last evidence of the trail during his lifetime, 1843-1932." (North Iowa Times, 5/5/1932) Michelle Pettit Library Director McGregor Public Library 334 Main Street McGregor, Iowa 52157 www.mcgregor.lib.ia.us

    04/26/2010 01:24:30
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] McGregor Trail
    2. Rees, Donald
    3. Thank you so much. Good information. My maternal xxxgrandfather, farmer James Baxter, came west from Rutland, VT about 1856 with his friend Oliver Mills, two bachelor Vermont farmers, and James settled in Cass Co. (in Lewis, SW Iowa). Good to know about the McGregor's Landing on the Mississippi, and I would like to learn more of each party's later course or trail across Iowa. James Baxter's Gpa...Sim(e)on Baxter was born on Martha's Vineyard c 1695. On Mon, Apr 26, 2010 at 5:24 PM, McGregor Public Library <mplib@mchsi.com>wrote: > > --Looking for information about "The McGregor Trail" > > McGregor, Iowa was established as McGregor's Landing -- a Mississippi River > crossing for pioneers heading west -- > > we lack information about the route pioneers took once they crossed the > river -- but the article below gives a glimpse of it. Probably the old route > (in McGregor) from the river would have been up Giard Avenue -- (Methodist > Hollow) --then across Iowa (would love to see the route marked out > somewhere) > > What do you recommend for me to locate information on this? Thank you > --Michelle, McGregor Public Library > > McGregor Trail soon to be marked by Waterloo man > > Waterloo - Where once the wheels of pioneers' prairie schooners cut ruts in > the soft, virgin soil, there will be emplanted in the earth at Sunnyside > Country Club, a bronze marker, 12 by 22 inches, pointing out the old > McGregor Trail. > > The ruts that were part of the old trail are still existent > after nearly 90 years and plainly visible across part of the Sunnyside > course, as the land there has never been touched by a plow. The ruts are > about a foot deep. > > The old trail led from McGregor, where there was a crossing from > Prairie du Chien and the Wisconsin country, southwest past Fort Atkinson to > Prairie Rapids Crossing (now Waterloo), a good ford across the Cedar and > then on to Des Moines and Independence, Kansas, where it connected with the > more renowned Oregon trail to the Pacific northwest. > > The marker, which is dedicated to the memory of the late George > E. Lichty, resident of Black Hawk county since an early day, has been > completed by the Art Bronze company here and will be placed under direction > of Burr G. and Robert Lichty, sons of George E. Lichty. > > Inscription on the marker reads: > > "This tablet marks the wagon ruts of the McGregor Trail, one of > the tributaries to the old Oregon trail in the westward movement which began > in 1848. Erected to the memory of George E. Lichty, who interested himself > and others in preserving this last evidence of the trail during his > lifetime, 1843-1932." > > (North Iowa Times, 5/5/1932) > > Michelle Pettit > Library Director > McGregor Public Library > 334 Main Street > McGregor, Iowa 52157 > www.mcgregor.lib.ia.us > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > -- Donald Rees, Headmaster Squaw Valley Academy 235 Squaw Valley Road Olympic Valley, California 96146 School Office 530-583-9393 DR Direct Line 530-583-1261 DR Cell 530-448-3320 http.//www.sva.org

    04/26/2010 12:00:07
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Overland Route "to fame and fortune"
    2. Leta Sheaffer
    3. Tom Lassek, Go to the net and type in Murphy Farm Wagon, there will also be one called Wagons which will show you pictures of the various types including the Murphy. There is also a history reference to the tails of the traveling families over the Oregon trail. Happy hunting - you will find much. Leta ----- Original Message ----- From: "Thomas E. Lassek" <granmagranpa@bellsouth.net> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> Sent: Saturday, June 27, 2009 1:09 PM Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Overland Route "to fame and fortune" > Good day to the list - > > I have a question that undoubtedly has been mirrored here several > hundred times - I ask for your indulgence once again in assistance. > > My Polish Great Grandparents are identified as having been physically > present at Chatsworth (Fairbury) Illinois in 1868. Ultimately they > travelled overland to Duncan Nebraska where they homesteaded. I'm > interested in validating the path that they took between Chatsworth > Illinois and Omaha Nebraska. > > A bit of Family Lore : They travelled in a modified Conestoga wagon > pulled by a team of oxen. The modified Conestoga was known as a "Murphy > Farm Wagon". They simply followed the railroad, so the story goes, until > they intersected the Mormon trail, then followed it to Omaha. > > I would appreciate any and all comments and I would be eternally > thankful for a map of that area during that time frame. > > Tom Lassek > Eufaula Alabama > Temperature terrible - 100f and 60% humidity > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >

    06/27/2009 10:37:13
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Overland Route "to fame and fortune"
    2. Thomas E. Lassek
    3. Good day to the list - I have a question that undoubtedly has been mirrored here several hundred times - I ask for your indulgence once again in assistance. My Polish Great Grandparents are identified as having been physically present at Chatsworth (Fairbury) Illinois in 1868. Ultimately they travelled overland to Duncan Nebraska where they homesteaded. I'm interested in validating the path that they took between Chatsworth Illinois and Omaha Nebraska. A bit of Family Lore : They travelled in a modified Conestoga wagon pulled by a team of oxen. The modified Conestoga was known as a "Murphy Farm Wagon". They simply followed the railroad, so the story goes, until they intersected the Mormon trail, then followed it to Omaha. I would appreciate any and all comments and I would be eternally thankful for a map of that area during that time frame. Tom Lassek Eufaula Alabama Temperature terrible - 100f and 60% humidity

    06/27/2009 06:09:09
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Fwd: IA to NE back to IA
    2. Gayle Struska
    3. I would be very interested in this map if you can send as a pdf file. I can print it, but I can't seem to save a pdf either. They save, but I can never read them after. Thanks, Gayle ----- Original Message ----- From: "Merri Vinton" <merzi@arvig.net> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> Sent: Monday, June 15, 2009 5:34 PM Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Fwd: IA to NE back to IA >I found an 1857 map of eastern NE that shows the trails, however it's > a PDF doc & for some reason comes through as a graphic. If anyone is > interested, please email me directly....I didn't know if I should > post it that way. > Merri > > Begin forwarded message: > >> From: <treesearcher@rushmore.com> >> Date: May 30, 2009 5:10:19 PM CDT >> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> >> Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA >> Reply-To: ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com >> >> Thank you, I met to say that they were Mormon at the time of going >> to NE but >> later became Reorganized Mormons. It would be great to find a map >> of the >> trail they took but your explaination is great. >> >> Linda >> >> >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Merri Vinton" <merzi@arvig.net> >> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> >> Sent: May 30, 2009 1:55 PM >> Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA >> >> >>> Hello >>> There was a trail that led north from "Winter Quarters" in Florence, >>> NE (now north Omaha) that passed through Ft. Calhoun (old Ft >>> Atkinson), then went westward over the hills to Fontanelle. My >>> g.g.grandparents place (1856) was on this old route (3 mi west of Ft >>> Calhoun). It served as a half-way point from Fontanelle to Florence >>> to the mill where they would grind their grain. I don't know that it >>> had a name. Some say it was called "The Ashley Trail" as this was a >>> trappers' route a generation before there was settlement in Nebraska. >>> I have NEVER been able to find such a marking on any old maps that >>> say Ashley Trail. There is a marker in our family cemetery >>> commemorating this trail from Florence to Fontanelle. The brother of >>> my g.g.grandfather ran the ferry from Council Bluffs (then >>> Kanesville) to Florence (north Omaha). He, Thomas ALLEN, also >>> assisted settlers in locating in the fledgling communities >>> (1854-1860) leading their wagons through the tall prairie grass said >>> to be "as high as the oxen's back". >>> >>> Also, I just happened to think, the first part of this journey would >>> have been The Mormon Trail which turned west in present day southern >>> Washington Co., but it didn't go directly to Fontanelle. I think it >>> was near today's Elk City which is a ways south of Fontanelle. They >>> possibly could have gone that way, but my bet in the Ft.Calhoun/old >>> Ft Atkinson route. Hope this helps. >>> >>> Today's route would be Hi-way 75 north out of Omaha. >>> Merri Allen Vinton >>> >>> ps..I'm very familiar with these communities....there are still >>> DERRY's in Washington Co (Blair). Wonder if there is a family >>> connection to your family. >>> >>> >>> On May 30, 2009, at 11:48 AM, <treesearcher@rushmore.com> wrote: >>> >>>> Hi, >>>> My Derry family came to USA in 1856, they came west by railroad, >>>> then Council Bluffs by wagon. They first located at Fontanelle, >>>> Nebraska, where they took up a homestead, remaining there about >>>> eight years. He then followed harness-making at Fontanelle until >>>> they moved to Lamoni, Iowa, in the spring of 1880. >>>> >>>> Does anyone know what route they would have taken from Council >>>> Bluffs to Fontanelle, NE and then when they moved to Lamoni, IA how >>>> they would have gone and what route? >>>> >>>> Thank you, >>>> Linda >>>> >>>> ------------------------------- >>>> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE- >>>> PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' >>>> without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >>>> >>> >>> >>> ------------------------------- >>> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to >>> IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' >>> without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >>> >>> >> >> >> >> ------------------------------- >> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE- >> PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' >> without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >> > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    06/15/2009 12:31:53
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Fwd: IA to NE back to IA
    2. Merri Vinton
    3. I found an 1857 map of eastern NE that shows the trails, however it's a PDF doc & for some reason comes through as a graphic. If anyone is interested, please email me directly....I didn't know if I should post it that way. Merri Begin forwarded message: > From: <treesearcher@rushmore.com> > Date: May 30, 2009 5:10:19 PM CDT > To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA > Reply-To: ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com > > Thank you, I met to say that they were Mormon at the time of going > to NE but > later became Reorganized Mormons. It would be great to find a map > of the > trail they took but your explaination is great. > > Linda > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Merri Vinton" <merzi@arvig.net> > To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Sent: May 30, 2009 1:55 PM > Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA > > >> Hello >> There was a trail that led north from "Winter Quarters" in Florence, >> NE (now north Omaha) that passed through Ft. Calhoun (old Ft >> Atkinson), then went westward over the hills to Fontanelle. My >> g.g.grandparents place (1856) was on this old route (3 mi west of Ft >> Calhoun). It served as a half-way point from Fontanelle to Florence >> to the mill where they would grind their grain. I don't know that it >> had a name. Some say it was called "The Ashley Trail" as this was a >> trappers' route a generation before there was settlement in Nebraska. >> I have NEVER been able to find such a marking on any old maps that >> say Ashley Trail. There is a marker in our family cemetery >> commemorating this trail from Florence to Fontanelle. The brother of >> my g.g.grandfather ran the ferry from Council Bluffs (then >> Kanesville) to Florence (north Omaha). He, Thomas ALLEN, also >> assisted settlers in locating in the fledgling communities >> (1854-1860) leading their wagons through the tall prairie grass said >> to be "as high as the oxen's back". >> >> Also, I just happened to think, the first part of this journey would >> have been The Mormon Trail which turned west in present day southern >> Washington Co., but it didn't go directly to Fontanelle. I think it >> was near today's Elk City which is a ways south of Fontanelle. They >> possibly could have gone that way, but my bet in the Ft.Calhoun/old >> Ft Atkinson route. Hope this helps. >> >> Today's route would be Hi-way 75 north out of Omaha. >> Merri Allen Vinton >> >> ps..I'm very familiar with these communities....there are still >> DERRY's in Washington Co (Blair). Wonder if there is a family >> connection to your family. >> >> >> On May 30, 2009, at 11:48 AM, <treesearcher@rushmore.com> wrote: >> >>> Hi, >>> My Derry family came to USA in 1856, they came west by railroad, >>> then Council Bluffs by wagon. They first located at Fontanelle, >>> Nebraska, where they took up a homestead, remaining there about >>> eight years. He then followed harness-making at Fontanelle until >>> they moved to Lamoni, Iowa, in the spring of 1880. >>> >>> Does anyone know what route they would have taken from Council >>> Bluffs to Fontanelle, NE and then when they moved to Lamoni, IA how >>> they would have gone and what route? >>> >>> Thank you, >>> Linda >>> >>> ------------------------------- >>> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE- >>> PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' >>> without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >>> >> >> >> ------------------------------- >> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to >> IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' >> without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >> >> > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE- > PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >

    06/15/2009 11:34:44
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857
    2. Iris Mendell Miller
    3. Barry, Thanks for you thoughts, That's sort of what I thought, but? They were tough people;o) It took me a while to figure out how several of my families had traveled from Fayette Co. PA. (far South/West corner of PA.)to the Ohio River. Then I found that the Monongahela River goes north from West Virginia though S/ W PA. and connects with the Allegheny River and Youghiogheny River to form the Ohio River. They traveled north on the Monongahela River then by steamboat traveled down Ohio River to the Mississippi, Then up the Mississippi River to McGregor's Landing arriving 23 April 1850. It was flooding at the time. A few years ago I was in McGregor when it was flooding and the town people were sand bagging, Not a pretty sight. Iris ----- Original Message ----- From: "Barry Zbornik" <iowaz@swbell.net> To: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com>; <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 8:10 PM Subject: Re: IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 > ====Everything used by early settlers was transported on the early > steamboats to include farm implements and livestock. However, oxen would > often have been bought/traded at/near landings after a migration. There > was significant Penn German movement over to the Ohio River flowage by > canal, train, trails and down the Ohio to the Mississppi River and then up > toward early St. L, Quincy.IL, MarionCity/Hannibal.MO.area, and northward > into NE Iowa by the 1830-1850's. There was also movement across to the > gold fields by trails and oxen 1849-1850's+ but at 4-12mi/day that was > slow going so if this family made a rapid/easy movement from Clayton Co, > to SW of KC it was likely by steamboat. My Heckart/Strayer line made > trips to the Upper Iowa river flowage in 1851 and 1852 to explore and > enter mill site land in what is now Decorah/Freeport but did not > overwinter, coming back by steamboat. They moved the families by steamboat > in late 1853 to the Port of Lansing, then overland to build a mill at > Freeport where they had already legally entered land. Family information > indicated they made the trip by oxen from Shelby Co, MO to Winn. Co, IA.. > Not so...I finally figured out these peopel were moving freely up/down the > River by streamboat as long as they had funds for passage. I have not > figured out if Stayer/Heckart transported their oxen and wagons by steamer > or acquired them in the Lansing area. In your case it would also be a > guess, however, I would think they purchased new stock/oxen in the KC > area, which was a small village at that time. Since your families of > interest had already made the movement to NEIA by steamboat and would have > had numerous connections with the PA German's in NEMO, it would have been > a simple movement for them in terms of understanding River travel. Just > some thoughts. Z > > Barry Zbornik > 625 N. Section St. > Hannibal, MO 63401 > 573-221-1319 > iowaz@swbell.net > iowaz@hotmail.com > http://www.iowaz.info/ > http://public.fotki.com/iowaz/ > *outgoing email scanned by Norton* > > > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com> > To: "Barry Zbornik" <iowaz@swbell.net>; <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 12:36 PM > Subject: IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 > McGregor's Landing is where the Wilson girls, their mother Christiana > Frey/ >> Wilson and extended families landed when going to Iowa from Pennsylvania >> by Steamboat in 1850. >> David Baer lived in Monona, IA. just a few miles from McGregor's. >> I would think in Mary Ann Bair's Obit. it would have been mentioned if >> they had traveled by Steamboat to Kansas? >> I'm not familiar with what was transported on Steamboats did they haul >> Oxen? >> Thanks, >> Iris > >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Barry Zbornik" <iowaz@swbell.net> >> To: <irislm@kc.rr.com>; <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> >> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 11:31 AM >> Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 >> >> >>> >>> ----- Original Message ----- >>> From: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com> >>> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> >>> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 9:27 AM >>> Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 >>> I wonder if some of you kind souls can help me figure out the how my >>> Great-grandparents got to Kansas so fast from the North/East corner of >>> Iowa? I often wondered what route my great-grandparents John and Mary >>> Ann (Wilson) Bair/Bear/Baer/Bare? And his brother David and wife >>> Angeline (Wilson /sisters) Baer and three small children, Would have >>> taken from Clayton County, Iowa to get to Franklin County, Kansas in >>> 1857. In Mary Ann Bair Obit. It's stated they came with oxen, John and >>> Mary Ann were married on the 9th of April 1857, The Territory /Voting >>> Census 1859 stated they were in Franklin County, Kansas in April of >>> 1857. I live in Kansas City, it's a good seven hour + drive and it's >>> and additional 40 minutes from here to Princeton, Franklin County, KS. >>> I almost always do the speed limit + and the majority of this is on >>> interstate, and the rest with good highways. It hard for me looking at >>> all the hills, rivers, and creeks in making the trip how they could do >>> it in such a short time. Something I thought might be possible is maybe >>> they came by Rafts, Steam Boat or Ect. Going down the Mississippi river. >>> To the Missouri river up the Missouri river to Kansas City or nearby >>> stop bringing their oxen's? If not by water, what would have been the >>> quickest route in that time? Thanks for your your expertise or thoughts >>> on this trip. Iris >>> >>> >>> ====Steamboat from Port of McGregor (or another landing close) down the >>> Mississippi to the Port of St. Charles on the Missouri River a few miles >>> west of St. L. Up the Missouri by steamboat to the KC area, then >>> overland a few miles. The Hannibal-St.Joe RR, the first RR across >>> Missouri was completed and operational by early 1859 and would then be a >>> major route for movement of northern pine lumber, supplies coming out of >>> the east by the Ohio River flowage and people for a number of years. >>> Regards, Z > > >

    06/07/2009 03:44:41
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857
    2. Barry Zbornik
    3. ====Everything used by early settlers was transported on the early steamboats to include farm implements and livestock. However, oxen would often have been bought/traded at/near landings after a migration. There was significant Penn German movement over to the Ohio River flowage by canal, train, trails and down the Ohio to the Mississppi River and then up toward early St. L, Quincy.IL, MarionCity/Hannibal.MO.area, and northward into NE Iowa by the 1830-1850's. There was also movement across to the gold fields by trails and oxen 1849-1850's+ but at 4-12mi/day that was slow going so if this family made a rapid/easy movement from Clayton Co, to SW of KC it was likely by steamboat. My Heckart/Strayer line made trips to the Upper Iowa river flowage in 1851 and 1852 to explore and enter mill site land in what is now Decorah/Freeport but did not overwinter, coming back by steamboat. They moved the families by steamboat in late 1853 to the Port of Lansing, then overland to build a mill at Freeport where they had already legally entered land. Family information indicated they made the trip by oxen from Shelby Co, MO to Winn. Co, IA.. Not so...I finally figured out these peopel were moving freely up/down the River by streamboat as long as they had funds for passage. I have not figured out if Stayer/Heckart transported their oxen and wagons by steamer or acquired them in the Lansing area. In your case it would also be a guess, however, I would think they purchased new stock/oxen in the KC area, which was a small village at that time. Since your families of interest had already made the movement to NEIA by steamboat and would have had numerous connections with the PA German's in NEMO, it would have been a simple movement for them in terms of understanding River travel. Just some thoughts. Z Barry Zbornik 625 N. Section St. Hannibal, MO 63401 573-221-1319 iowaz@swbell.net iowaz@hotmail.com http://www.iowaz.info/ http://public.fotki.com/iowaz/ *outgoing email scanned by Norton* ----- Original Message ----- From: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com> To: "Barry Zbornik" <iowaz@swbell.net>; <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 12:36 PM Subject: IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 McGregor's Landing is where the Wilson girls, their mother Christiana Frey/ > Wilson and extended families landed when going to Iowa from Pennsylvania > by Steamboat in 1850. > David Baer lived in Monona, IA. just a few miles from McGregor's. > I would think in Mary Ann Bair's Obit. it would have been mentioned if > they had traveled by Steamboat to Kansas? > I'm not familiar with what was transported on Steamboats did they haul > Oxen? > Thanks, > Iris > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Barry Zbornik" <iowaz@swbell.net> > To: <irislm@kc.rr.com>; <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 11:31 AM > Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 > > >> >> ----- Original Message ----- >> From: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com> >> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> >> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 9:27 AM >> Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 >> I wonder if some of you kind souls can help me figure out the how my >> Great-grandparents got to Kansas so fast from the North/East corner of >> Iowa? I often wondered what route my great-grandparents John and Mary Ann >> (Wilson) Bair/Bear/Baer/Bare? And his brother David and wife Angeline >> (Wilson /sisters) Baer and three small children, Would have taken from >> Clayton County, Iowa to get to Franklin County, Kansas in 1857. In Mary >> Ann Bair Obit. It's stated they came with oxen, John and Mary Ann were >> married on the 9th of April 1857, The Territory /Voting Census 1859 >> stated they were in Franklin County, Kansas in April of 1857. I live in >> Kansas City, it's a good seven hour + drive and it's and additional 40 >> minutes from here to Princeton, Franklin County, KS. I almost always do >> the speed limit + and the majority of this is on interstate, and the rest >> with good highways. It hard for me looking at all the hills, rivers, and >> creeks in making the trip how they could do it in such a short time. >> Something I thought might be possible is maybe they came by Rafts, Steam >> Boat or Ect. Going down the Mississippi river. To the Missouri river up >> the Missouri river to Kansas City or nearby stop bringing their oxen's? >> If not by water, what would have been the quickest route in that time? >> Thanks for your your expertise or thoughts on this trip. Iris >> >> >> ====Steamboat from Port of McGregor (or another landing close) down the >> Mississippi to the Port of St. Charles on the Missouri River a few miles >> west of St. L. Up the Missouri by steamboat to the KC area, then >> overland a few miles. The Hannibal-St.Joe RR, the first RR across >> Missouri was completed and operational by early 1859 and would then be a >> major route for movement of northern pine lumber, supplies coming out of >> the east by the Ohio River flowage and people for a number of years. >> Regards, Z

    06/07/2009 02:10:12
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857
    2. Iris Mendell Miller
    3. McGregor's Landing is where the Wilson girls, their mother Christiana Frey/ Wilson and extended families landed when going to Iowa from Pennsylvania by Steamboat in 1850. David Baer lived in Monona, IA. just a few miles from McGregor's. I would think in Mary Ann Bair's Obit. it would have been mentioned if they had traveled by Steamboat to Kansas? I'm not familiar with what was transported on Steamboats did they haul Oxen? Thanks, Iris ----- Original Message ----- From: "Barry Zbornik" <iowaz@swbell.net> To: <irislm@kc.rr.com>; <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 11:31 AM Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com> > To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 9:27 AM > Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 > I wonder if some of you kind souls can help me figure out the how my > Great-grandparents got to Kansas so fast from the North/East corner of > Iowa? I often wondered what route my great-grandparents John and Mary Ann > (Wilson) Bair/Bear/Baer/Bare? And his brother David and wife Angeline > (Wilson /sisters) Baer and three small children, Would have taken from > Clayton County, Iowa to get to Franklin County, Kansas in 1857. In Mary > Ann Bair Obit. It's stated they came with oxen, John and Mary Ann were > married on the 9th of April 1857, The Territory /Voting Census 1859 > stated they were in Franklin County, Kansas in April of 1857. I live in > Kansas City, it's a good seven hour + drive and it's and additional 40 > minutes from here to Princeton, Franklin County, KS. I almost always do > the speed limit + and the majority of this is on interstate, and the rest > with good highways. It hard for me looking at all the hills, rivers, and > creeks in making the trip how they could do it in such a short time. > Something I thought might be possible is maybe they came by Rafts, Steam > Boat or Ect. Going down the Mississippi river. To the Missouri river up > the Missouri river to Kansas City or nearby stop bringing their oxen's? > If not by water, what would have been the quickest route in that time? > Thanks for your your expertise or thoughts on this trip. Iris > > > ====Steamboat from Port of McGregor (or another landing close) down the > Mississippi to the Port of St. Charles on the Missouri River a few miles > west of St. L. Up the Missouri by steamboat to the KC area, then overland > a few miles. The Hannibal-St.Joe RR, the first RR across Missouri was > completed and operational by early 1859 and would then be a major route > for movement of northern pine lumber, supplies coming out of the east by > the Ohio River flowage and people for a number of years. Regards, Z > > > > > Barry Zbornik > 625 N. Section St. > Hannibal, MO 63401 > 573-221-1319 > iowaz@swbell.net > iowaz@hotmail.com > http://www.iowaz.info/ > http://public.fotki.com/iowaz/ > *outgoing email scanned by Norton* > >

    06/07/2009 06:36:21
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857
    2. Barry Zbornik
    3. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Iris Mendell Miller" <irislm@kc.rr.com> To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> Sent: Sunday, June 07, 2009 9:27 AM Subject: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857 I wonder if some of you kind souls can help me figure out the how my Great-grandparents got to Kansas so fast from the North/East corner of Iowa? I often wondered what route my great-grandparents John and Mary Ann (Wilson) Bair/Bear/Baer/Bare? And his brother David and wife Angeline (Wilson /sisters) Baer and three small children, Would have taken from Clayton County, Iowa to get to Franklin County, Kansas in 1857. In Mary Ann Bair Obit. It's stated they came with oxen, John and Mary Ann were married on the 9th of April 1857, The Territory /Voting Census 1859 stated they were in Franklin County, Kansas in April of 1857. I live in Kansas City, it's a good seven hour + drive and it's and additional 40 minutes from here to Princeton, Franklin County, KS. I almost always do the speed limit + and the majority of this is on interstate, and the rest with good highways. It hard for me looking at all the hills, rivers, and creeks in making the trip how they could do it in such a short time. Something I thought might be possible is maybe they came by Rafts, Steam Boat or Ect. Going down the Mississippi river. To the Missouri river up the Missouri river to Kansas City or nearby stop bringing their oxen's? If not by water, what would have been the quickest route in that time? Thanks for your your expertise or thoughts on this trip. Iris ====Steamboat from Port of McGregor (or another landing close) down the Mississippi to the Port of St. Charles on the Missouri River a few miles west of St. L. Up the Missouri by steamboat to the KC area, then overland a few miles. The Hannibal-St.Joe RR, the first RR across Missouri was completed and operational by early 1859 and would then be a major route for movement of northern pine lumber, supplies coming out of the east by the Ohio River flowage and people for a number of years. Regards, Z Barry Zbornik 625 N. Section St. Hannibal, MO 63401 573-221-1319 iowaz@swbell.net iowaz@hotmail.com http://www.iowaz.info/ http://public.fotki.com/iowaz/ *outgoing email scanned by Norton*

    06/07/2009 05:31:02
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to KS 1857
    2. Iris Mendell Miller
    3. Hi, I wonder if some of you kind souls can help me figure out the how my Great-grandparents got to Kansas so fast from the North/East corner of Iowa? I often wondered what route my great-grandparents John and Mary Ann (Wilson) Bair/Bear/Baer/Bare? And his brother David and wife Angeline (Wilson /sisters) Baer and three small children, Would have taken from Clayton County, Iowa to get to Franklin County, Kansas in 1857. In Mary Ann Bair Obit. It's stated they came with oxen, John and Mary Ann were married on the 9th of April 1857, The Territory /Voting Census 1859 stated they were in Franklin County, Kansas in April of 1857. I live in Kansas City, it's a good seven hour + drive and it's and additional 40 minutes from here to Princeton, Franklin County, KS. I almost always do the speed limit + and the majority of this is on interstate, and the rest with good highways. It hard for me looking at all the hills, rivers, and creeks in making the trip how they could do it in such a short time. Something I thought might be possible is maybe they came by Rafts, Steam Boat or Ect. Going down the Mississippi river To the Missouri river up the Missouri river to Kansas City or nearby stop bringing their oxen's? If not by water, what would have been the quickest route in that time? Thanks for your your expertise or thoughts on this trip. Iris ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message >

    06/07/2009 03:27:54
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA
    2. drees
    3. Dear Tom, Wonderful stuff. Thanks so much. N D Rees (Baxter IA since 1856.) > From: "Thomas E. Lassek" <granmagranpa@bellsouth.net> > Reply-To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Date: Sun, 31 May 2009 01:03:39 -0500 > To: <ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com> > Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA > > > ----- Original Message ----- > From: Merri Vinton > To: ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com > Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2009 2:55 PM > Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA > > > Hello > There was a trail that led north from "Winter Quarters" in Florence, > NE (now north Omaha) that passed through Ft. Calhoun (old Ft > Atkinson), then went westward over the hills to Fontanelle. My > g.g.grandparents place (1856) was on this old route (3 mi west of Ft > Calhoun). It served as a half-way point from Fontanelle to Florence > to the mill where they would grind their grain. I don't know that it > had a name. Some say it was called "The Ashley Trail" as this was a > trappers' route a generation before there was settlement in Nebraska. > I have NEVER been able to find such a marking on any old maps that > say Ashley Trail. There is a marker in our family cemetery > commemorating this trail from Florence to Fontanelle. The brother of > my g.g.grandfather ran the ferry from Council Bluffs (then > Kanesville) to Florence (north Omaha). He, Thomas ALLEN, also > assisted settlers in locating in the fledgling communities > (1854-1860) leading their wagons through the tall prairie grass said > to be "as high as the oxen's back". > > ** Yes, these early placements were there mainly to protect the trapper. > Once the area became stable, protection was no longer necessary. Accordingly, > these early Forts were simply closed, such as Fort Atkinson, the property and > holdings either given to or sold to locals. As settlers arrived, some were > kept open to "protect" them and to deal with the indigenous population as only > a military force can. > > Personally, I don't think that you will ever see "The Ashley Trail" on a > map. Having said this, if you do find the phrase, I would opine that it > wouldn't be in relation to trapping. It would have to be several years in the > future when those that wish to do so would identify the trail as a landmark or > in some manner related historically. > I am a retired soldier, having spent 24 years both in the service and as > a civilian, living in a small Alaskan town named Delta Junction which was > about 100 miles South of Fairbanks, at the end of the Alaskan highway. Every > winter, a good portion of my time was spent trapping, a time in my life when > trapping was my hobby. I found it both enjoyable and profitable. I no longer > trap. > > My point here is to offer a perspective, perhaps somewhat different > than some would imagine. The last possible thing that a trapper wants is for > someone to identify his trapping trail, let alone name it. (My trapping trail > was about 80 miles). I trapped as a hobby - there were those who trapped for a > living. There are those trappers who don't "take kindly" to others stomping > over their trapping area because it disrupts the natural flow of wildlife, > which equates to a loss in profit for themselves and their family. > > There are also those trappers who are about a half bubble off, if you > catch my drift, who live in the remote areas they trap and wouldn't bat an eye > in "insuring" that intruders interfere only once. After a good many years, I > have met others that pretty-much live off the land with the exception of salt > and sugar which they had to buy or barter for. A good portion of these people > intentionally isolate themselves in remote areas for reasons of their own. > > That is now. Around 200 years ago prior to settlers arriving in > Nebraska and Iowa (the Frontier as it were), they were worse. > > - - - - - > > The pilings still exist that supported the ferry system between Iowa > and Nebraska, Kanesville Iowa and Omaha. The distance between the two points > is almost staggering, that is to say, further apart than one would imagine > owing to those who used the power of the mighty Missouri to their advantage. > "Council Bluffs" is a misnomer. It was originally named "Council bluff" - > however, our Western minds, over time, felt the plural is "More Better" in > usage. > > Winter Quarters was huge, bigger than I anticipated when reading of it. > After meandering around North Omaha, it eventually dumps into today's "L" > street, or highway 92/275 West which went right by the home I grew up in at > 4th and "L". The main stable area for Winter Quarters was located between > 50th and 60th and "L" where a cool spring provided the water necessary for > both the beasts of burden and other livestock. > > I'm not sure exactly when, but I'm thinking in the 1940's or > thereabouts, "L" street was due for expansion and this natural spring posed a > problem because it's volume, when added to rainfall and snowmelt sometimes > spilled over onto the road, which to the bureaucrats, was a cause for concer > Appropriately, a cement culvert, somewhere around 8 feet in diameter > was laid under the road which stopped the "problem". I still don't know where > all this water goes. Anyway, there is a plaque in the weeds there attesting to > all I have said above. > > The LDS has a museum there in Omaha, which I must visit when I visit > again. I guess it's fairly comprehensive. If anyone wants to read about the > early years there in Omaha and Council bluffs, I recommend the following. All > have information concerning where the early church records are reposited. > > -- The Franciscans in Nebraska and Historical Sketches of Mid-Nebraska ~ > Eugene Hagedorn O.F.M. Original : 1856, Reprint 1931. > -- History of the Catholic Church in Nebraska, (Multi Volume), Catholic > Chapters in Nebraska Immigration ~ Henry Casper S.J. : 1966. > -- The Jesuits of the Middle United States (multi volume) ~ Gilbert J. > Garraghan S.J., Ph.D. : 1938 > > I offer these references, not for the religious content, rather for it's > historic and genealogical value. > > Tom Lassek > Eufaula Alabama > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without > the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    06/06/2009 02:33:53
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Surname STRUSKA
    2. Thomas E. Lassek
    3. Good day to the list - I note the honorable surname STRUSKA as posted on this list and would appreciate the permission of the "owner" to examine and post it's origin and meaning. In addition to genealogy, I enjoy onomastics (the study of surnames) which, over the years, has proven to be a good tool, complimenting each other. I am of Polish ethnicity and limit my amateur endeavor to my brothers and sisters of Polish roots. I also examine Germanic surnames since during the time of the partitions there is a very strong German presence in Western Poland, the area from whence my Family was found. Here, the lines blurr - intermarriage along with cross-culteration produce a mixing pot where Poles may be German and Germans may be Poles. Oftentimes, surname source information tangents to other relevant subjects as part of the overall immigration experience of our ancestors. By way of example, few know that there are area's on the Mormon trail where Slavic peoples grouped by ethnicity and removed themselves to a parallel course through Portions of Nebraska. One location is near Columbus Nebraska along the Platte River. Tom Lassek

    05/31/2009 08:38:00
    1. [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] Surname Comment - STRUSKA
    2. Thomas E. Lassek
    3. Good day to the list - I note the honorable surname STRUSKA as posted on this list and would appreciate the permission of the "owner" to examine and post it's origin and meaning. In addition to genealogy, I enjoy onomastics (the study of surnames) which, over the years, has proven to be a good tool, complimenting each other. I am of Polish ethnicity and limit my amateur endeavor to my brothers and sisters of Polish roots. I also examine Germanic surnames since during the time of the partitions there is a very strong German presence in Western Poland, the area from whence my Family was found. Here, the lines blurr - intermarriage along with cross-culteration produce a mixing pot where Poles may be German and Germans may be Poles. Oftentimes, surname source information tangents to other relevent subjects as part of the overall immigration experience of our ancestors. By way of example, few know that there are area's on the Mormon trail where Slavic peoples grouped by ethnicity and removed themselves to a parallel course through Portions of Nebraska. One location is near Columbus Nebraska along the Platte River. Tom Lassek

    05/31/2009 08:36:37
    1. Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA
    2. Thomas E. Lassek
    3. ----- Original Message ----- From: Merri Vinton To: ia-ne-pioneertrails@rootsweb.com Sent: Saturday, May 30, 2009 2:55 PM Subject: Re: [IA-NE-PIONEERTRAILS] IA to NE back to IA Hello There was a trail that led north from "Winter Quarters" in Florence, NE (now north Omaha) that passed through Ft. Calhoun (old Ft Atkinson), then went westward over the hills to Fontanelle. My g.g.grandparents place (1856) was on this old route (3 mi west of Ft Calhoun). It served as a half-way point from Fontanelle to Florence to the mill where they would grind their grain. I don't know that it had a name. Some say it was called "The Ashley Trail" as this was a trappers' route a generation before there was settlement in Nebraska. I have NEVER been able to find such a marking on any old maps that say Ashley Trail. There is a marker in our family cemetery commemorating this trail from Florence to Fontanelle. The brother of my g.g.grandfather ran the ferry from Council Bluffs (then Kanesville) to Florence (north Omaha). He, Thomas ALLEN, also assisted settlers in locating in the fledgling communities (1854-1860) leading their wagons through the tall prairie grass said to be "as high as the oxen's back". ** Yes, these early placements were there mainly to protect the trapper. Once the area became stable, protection was no longer necessary. Accordingly, these early Forts were simply closed, such as Fort Atkinson, the property and holdings either given to or sold to locals. As settlers arrived, some were kept open to "protect" them and to deal with the indigenous population as only a military force can. Personally, I don't think that you will ever see "The Ashley Trail" on a map. Having said this, if you do find the phrase, I would opine that it wouldn't be in relation to trapping. It would have to be several years in the future when those that wish to do so would identify the trail as a landmark or in some manner related historically. I am a retired soldier, having spent 24 years both in the service and as a civilian, living in a small Alaskan town named Delta Junction which was about 100 miles South of Fairbanks, at the end of the Alaskan highway. Every winter, a good portion of my time was spent trapping, a time in my life when trapping was my hobby. I found it both enjoyable and profitable. I no longer trap. My point here is to offer a perspective, perhaps somewhat different than some would imagine. The last possible thing that a trapper wants is for someone to identify his trapping trail, let alone name it. (My trapping trail was about 80 miles). I trapped as a hobby - there were those who trapped for a living. There are those trappers who don't "take kindly" to others stomping over their trapping area because it disrupts the natural flow of wildlife, which equates to a loss in profit for themselves and their family. There are also those trappers who are about a half bubble off, if you catch my drift, who live in the remote areas they trap and wouldn't bat an eye in "insuring" that intruders interfere only once. After a good many years, I have met others that pretty-much live off the land with the exception of salt and sugar which they had to buy or barter for. A good portion of these people intentionally isolate themselves in remote areas for reasons of their own. That is now. Around 200 years ago prior to settlers arriving in Nebraska and Iowa (the Frontier as it were), they were worse. - - - - - The pilings still exist that supported the ferry system between Iowa and Nebraska, Kanesville Iowa and Omaha. The distance between the two points is almost staggering, that is to say, further apart than one would imagine owing to those who used the power of the mighty Missouri to their advantage. "Council Bluffs" is a misnomer. It was originally named "Council bluff" - however, our Western minds, over time, felt the plural is "More Better" in usage. Winter Quarters was huge, bigger than I anticipated when reading of it. After meandering around North Omaha, it eventually dumps into today's "L" street, or highway 92/275 West which went right by the home I grew up in at 4th and "L". The main stable area for Winter Quarters was located between 50th and 60th and "L" where a cool spring provided the water necessary for both the beasts of burden and other livestock. I'm not sure exactly when, but I'm thinking in the 1940's or thereabouts, "L" street was due for expansion and this natural spring posed a problem because it's volume, when added to rainfall and snowmelt sometimes spilled over onto the road, which to the bureaucrats, was a cause for concer Appropriately, a cement culvert, somewhere around 8 feet in diameter was laid under the road which stopped the "problem". I still don't know where all this water goes. Anyway, there is a plaque in the weeds there attesting to all I have said above. The LDS has a museum there in Omaha, which I must visit when I visit again. I guess it's fairly comprehensive. If anyone wants to read about the early years there in Omaha and Council bluffs, I recommend the following. All have information concerning where the early church records are reposited. -- The Franciscans in Nebraska and Historical Sketches of Mid-Nebraska ~ Eugene Hagedorn O.F.M. Original : 1856, Reprint 1931. -- History of the Catholic Church in Nebraska, (Multi Volume), Catholic Chapters in Nebraska Immigration ~ Henry Casper S.J. : 1966. -- The Jesuits of the Middle United States (multi volume) ~ Gilbert J. Garraghan S.J., Ph.D. : 1938 I offer these references, not for the religious content, rather for it's historic and genealogical value. Tom Lassek Eufaula Alabama

    05/30/2009 07:03:39