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    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Middlesex County Massachusetts Cemeteries
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. Middlesex County Massachusetts Cemeteries <https://webmail.west.cox.net/do/redirect?url=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.accessgenealogy.com%252Fcemetery%252Fmiddlesex-county-massachusetts-cemeteries.htm>*by Paula Franklin <https://webmail.west.cox.net/do/redirect?url=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.accessgenealogy.com%252F%253Fauthor%253D16508>* *A complete listing of all available online Middlesex County Massachusetts cemeteries, with links to multiple cemetery transcriptions, gravestone photos, tombstone photos, official records, etc.* *Read more of this post* <https://webmail.west.cox.net/do/redirect?url=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.accessgenealogy.com%252Fcemetery%252Fmiddlesex-county-massachusetts-cemeteries.htm> *Paula Franklin <https://webmail.west.cox.net/do/redirect?url=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.accessgenealogy.com%252F%253Fauthor%253D16508> | May 2, 2019 at 3:29 pm | URL: https://www.accessgenealogy.com/?p=368128 <https://webmail.west.cox.net/do/redirect?url=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.accessgenealogy.com%252F%253Fp%253D368128>* Sally Rolls Pavia [email protected] "Our Soldiers are one of our greatest assets!"

    05/02/2019 04:34:42
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] TODAY IN HISTORY - April 12 2019
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. *DID YOU KNOW?* *TODAY IN HISTORY* 12 Apr 1861 - Civil War begins as Confederate forces fire on Fort Sumter The bloodiest four years in American history begin when Confederate shore batteries under General P.G.T. Beauregard <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/pgt-beauregard> open fire on Union-held Fort Sumter <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/fort-sumter> in South Carolina’s Charleston Bay. During the next 34 hours, 50 Confederate guns and mortars launched more than 4,000 rounds at the poorly supplied fort. On April 13, U.S. Major Robert Anderson surrendered the fort. Two days later, U.S. President Abraham Lincoln <https://www.history.com/topics/us-presidents/abraham-lincoln> issued a proclamation calling for 75,000 volunteer soldiers to quell the Southern “insurrection.” As early as 1858, the ongoing conflict between North and South over the issue of slavery had led Southern leadership to discuss a unified separation from the United States. By 1860, the majority of the slave states were publicly threatening secession if the Republicans, the anti-slavery party, won the presidency. Following Republican Abraham Lincoln’s victory over the divided Democratic Party in November 1860, South Carolina <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/south-carolina> immediately initiated secession proceedings. On December 20, the South Carolina legislature passed the “Ordinance of Secession,” which declared that “the Union now subsisting between South Carolina and other states, under the name of the United States of America, is hereby dissolved.” After the declaration, South Carolina set about seizing forts, arsenals, and other strategic locations within the state. Within six weeks, five more Southern states–Mississippi <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/mississippi>, Florida <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/florida>, Alabama <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/alabama>, Georgia <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/georgia>, and Louisiana–had followed South Carolina’s lead. In February 1861, delegates from those states convened to establish a unified government. Jefferson Davis <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/jefferson-davis> of Mississippi was subsequently elected the first president of the Confederate States of America <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/confederate-states-of-america>. When Abraham Lincoln was inaugurated on March 4, 1861, a total of seven states (Texas <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/texas> had joined the pack) had seceded from the Union, and federal troops held only Fort Sumter in South Carolina, Fort Pickens off the Florida coast, and a handful of minor outposts in the South. Four years after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter, the Confederacy was defeated at the total cost of 620,000 Union and Confederate soldiers dead. 12 Apr 1864 - Hundreds of Union soldiers killed in Fort Pillow Massacre During the American <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war>Civil War <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/american-civil-war-history>, Major General Nathan Bedford Forrest’s Confederate raiders attack the isolated Union garrison at Fort Pillow, Tennessee <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/tennessee>, overlooking the Mississippi <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/mississippi> River. The fort, an important part of the Confederate river defense system, was captured by federal forces in 1862. Of the 500-strong Union garrison defending the fort, more than half the soldiers were African-Americans. After an initial bombardment, General Forrest asked for the garrison’s surrender. The Union commander refused, and Forrest’s 1,500 cavalry troopers easily stormed and captured the fort, suffering only moderate casualties. However, the extremely high proportion of Union casualties–231 killed and more than 100 seriously wounded–raised questions about the Confederates’ conduct after the battle. Union survivors’ accounts, later supported by a federal investigation, concluded that African-American troops were massacred by Forrest’s men after surrendering. Southern accounts disputed these findings, and controversy over the battle continues today. The enlistment of African-Americans into the Union army began after the enactment of the Emancipation Proclamation <https://www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war/emancipation-proclamation> on January 1, 1863, and by the war’s end 180,000 African Americans had fought in the Union army and 10,000 in the navy. 12 Apr 1945 - President Roosevelt dies Franklin Delano Roosevelt, the longest serving president in American history, dies of a cerebral hemorrhage three months into his fourth term. In 1932, at the height of the Great Depression <http://www.history.com/topics/great-depression>, Governor Roosevelt of New York <https://www.history.com/topics/us-states/new-york> was elected the 32nd president of the United States. In his inaugural address in March 1933, President Roosevelt promised Americans that “the only thing we have to fear is fear itself” and outlined his “New Deal”–an expansion of the federal government as an instrument of employment opportunity and welfare. Although criticized by the business community, Roosevelt’s progressive legislation improved America’s economic climate, and in 1936 he swept to re-election. During his second term, he became increasingly concerned with German and Japanese aggression and so began a long campaign to awaken America from its isolationist slumber. In 1940, with World War II raging in Europe and the Pacific, Roosevelt agreed to run for an unprecedented third term. Re-elected by Americans who valued his strong leadership, he proved a highly effective commander in chief during World War II. Under Roosevelt’s guidance, America became, in his own words, the “*great arsenal of democracy*” and succeeded in shifting the balance of power in World War II firmly in the Allies’ favor. In 1944, with the war not yet won, he was re-elected to a fourth term. Three months after his inauguration, while resting at his retreat in Warm Springs, Georgia, Roosevelt died of a massive cerebral hemorrhage at the age of 63. Following a solemn parade of his coffin through the streets of the nation’s capital, his body was buried in a family plot in Hyde Park, New York. Millions of Americans mourned the death of the man who led the United States through two of the greatest crises of the 20th century: the Great Depression and World War II. Roosevelt’s unparalleled 13 years as president led to the passing of the 22nd Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which limited future presidents to a maximum of two consecutive elected terms in office.

    04/12/2019 01:11:01
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List -- Tustin Blimp Hangers AMD First American Orphanage
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. DID YOU KNOW? Tustin Blimp Hangars These enormous World War II relics are some of the largest wooden structures in the world From Atlas Obscura These two mammoth blimp hangars were built in the aftermath of the attack on Pearl Harbor to house the manned airships that patrolled the coast of California, looking for enemy submarines. At 17 stories high and over 1,000 feet long, they tower over the houses in the Orange County town of Tustin, CA and are still among the largest freestanding wooden structures on the planet. [For years, if you drove out as far as Tustin, and it was quite a drive from Whittier, the only thing there were these HUGE hangers, no housing – just Marines. Sally] The Tustin military base was built in 1942 to keep and maintain the lighter-than-air (LTA) airships operated by the U.S. Navy. The giant hangars were made almost entirely of wood as steel was in short supply due to the war effort. Each hangar covers about 7 acres of enclosed space, enough to house six lightweight helium blimps each about 250 feet long. The sheer scale of the structures would earn them recognition as a National Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. After the dirigibles war program was shut down in 1949, the obsolete blimp hangars were used for Marine helicopter training with the outset of the Korean War. The base, then known as the Marine Corps Air Station Tustin (and nicknamed “Hangar City”) operated until 1999 when it shut down for good. The disused hangars still stand today, though the future of these historic relics of airship warfare is uncertain. ======================================================= [My ggrandmother was a single mother who worked as a live-in cook, so my grandmother lived in an orphanage in Kansas City, MO. Sally] The first American orphanage was established in 1729, after a massacre took out most of the adults in a Mississippi settlement. Before that, kids who lost their parents went to live with relatives, were apprenticed to tradesmen, or ended up begging on city streets. According to Virginia Commonwealth University, the American practice of stuffing kids into orphanages (even though many of them weren't even orphans, but the children of poor, single mothers) didn't really start to come into question until the 1920s, when most states implemented "mother's pensions." That gave poor mothers the financial ability to care for their own children rather than placing them in institutionalized care. Orphanages started to phase out in the early 20th century, although they do still exist in another form — today they're called "group homes." Read More: http://tinyurl.com/y4jta6ve

    04/09/2019 09:58:33
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] 7 Tips to find English or Welsh ancestors’ Wills before 1858 AND A European origin for leprosy?
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. FamilyHistoryResearcher.com Nick Thorne 7 Tips to find English or Welsh ancestors’ Wills before 1858 Finding your English or Welsh ancestors’ wills before 1858 in the Church courts Before 1858 there was an intricate system of probate courts in existence coming under the jurisdiction of the church. It befell to these ecclesiastical courts, ranging from Bishop’s courts to Archdeacon’s courts and some Peculiar courts, to grant probate on the last will and testament of our English and Welsh forebears. If someone was particularly wealthy, or they had goods in more than one diocese or jurisdiction, then probate would be granted by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, for the southern province of the country, or the Prerogative Court of York for the Northern province. Where the testator had goods in both the north and southern province then the PCC granted probate. The copies of the wills for the Prerogative Court of Canterbury are held at The National Archives in Kew while the Prerogative Court of York are at the Borthwick Institute. This short video is intended to introduce you to the subject of pre-1858 English/Welsh wills, but to find out more there is a lesson on the subject within the Family History Researcher course on English and Welsh family history (links in the tabs at the top of the page). The best way to discover the records of your ancestors is to learn as much as you can about the hundreds of records, data research sites and various archives that there are by taking a genealogy course. Nick, The Nosey Genealogist has a really useful blog packed with family history tips and also various learning material. His extremely well received family history course – that can quickly put you back on track – is available from a link above. Please share this video: https://youtu.be/vjgi1NPxw7c =================================================== Archaeology News Network A European origin for leprosy? May 10, 2018 New research by an international team including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the University of Tübingen, EPFL Lausanne and the University of Zurich has revealed that there was much more diversity in the leprosy strains circulating in Medieval Europe than previously thought. This finding, based on the sequencing of 10 new ancient genomes from the leprosy-causing bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, complicates prior assumptions about the origin and spread of the disease, and also includes the oldest M. Leprae genome sequenced to date, from about 400 AD in the United Kingdom. Read more at https://preview.tinyurl.com/yaej3o4p

    03/11/2019 11:43:10
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Black Homesteaders in the West
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. This is an interesting article: The disappearing story of the black homesteaders who pioneered the Westhttps://tinyurl.com/ybt7kbpq  Sally Rolls Pavia 602 550-1807 [email protected] List Owner: [email protected] "Soldiers do not die until they are forgotten." "Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many.”

    01/29/2019 09:40:17
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Re: Sally sent you this greeting from Blue Mountain!
    2. Bonnie Schneiderman
    3. Beautiful card...thank you. Merry Christmas to you and yours. Have a great day and God Bless! Bonnie On Sunday, December 23, 2018, 11:14:57 AM PST, Sally Pavia <[email protected]> wrote: Pick up your special delivery from Sally - [email protected] Season's Greetings from: Sally [email protected] To: Special Friends Prefer not to click on links within this email? Just type: https://www.bluemountain.com/findit into your browser and enter The code: 184a852d along with your email address. This email was sent to [email protected] by BlueMountain.com _______________________________________________ Email preferences: http://bit.ly/rootswebpref Unsubscribe https://lists.rootsweb.com/postorius/lists/[email protected] Privacy Statement: https://ancstry.me/2JWBOdY Terms and Conditions: https://ancstry.me/2HDBym9 Rootsweb Blog: http://rootsweb.blog RootsWeb is funded and supported by Ancestry.com and our loyal RootsWeb community

    12/23/2018 07:36:45
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Sally sent you this greeting from Blue Mountain!
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. Pick up your special delivery from Sally - [email protected] Season's Greetings from: Sally [email protected] To: Special Friends Prefer not to click on links within this email? Just type: https://www.bluemountain.com/findit into your browser and enter The code: 184a852d along with your email address. This email was sent to [email protected] by BlueMountain.com

    12/23/2018 11:50:55
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Remember Pearl Harbor - 77th Anniversary
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. Today is the 77th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. On Dec. 7, 1941, more than 2,400 Americans died and another 1,000 people were wounded in a surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The next day, President Franklin D. Roosevelt asked Congress to declare war on Japan.

    12/07/2018 01:03:48
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List, dated 30 Oct 2018 -- SORRY IF THIS IS A DUPLICATE
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. DID YOU KNOW? 30 Oct 2018 To Restore Civil Society, Start With the Library This crucial institution is being neglected just when we need it the most. By Eric Klinenberg Mr. Klinenberg is a sociologist Sept. 8, 2018 Is the public library obsolete? A lot of powerful forces in society seem to think so. In recent years, declines in the circulation of bound books in some parts of the country have led prominent critics to argue that libraries are no longer serving their historical function. Countless elected officials insist that in the 21st century — when so many books are digitized, so much public culture exists online and so often people interact virtually — libraries no longer need the support they once commanded. Libraries are already starved for resources. In some cities, even affluent ones like Atlanta, entire branches are being shut down. In San Jose, Calif., just down the road from Facebook, Google and Apple, the public library budget is so tight that users with overdue fees above $20 aren’t allowed to borrow books or use computers. For the remainder of the article: https://tinyurl.com/y954kdf9 ========================================== Black Poppies: Writing About Britain's Black Servicemen During WWI By Andria Williams "The First World War is usually viewed as a predominantly white conflict," writes historian Stephen Bourne in his book Black Poppies: Britain's Black Community and the Great War. Writer Andria Williams found this to be true as she began research for her next novel featuring a WWI black British soldier. This week at WWrite, Williams shares her exploration into this little-known aspect of WWI history that she aims to bring to light in her fictional work. A military spouse, Williams is the author of The Longest Night, a scintillating debut novel about a young couple whose marriage is tested when they move to an army base rife with love triangles, life-or-death conflicts, and a dramatic cover-up. Read this unique post about navigating between historical facts and the creative craft of writing fiction. https://tinyurl.com/yc4uvyxt ========================================== Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter European Parliament Votes in Favor of Controversial Copyright Laws By Dick Eastman, dated September 12, 2018 At this time, the new, restrictive copyright law passed Monday by the European Parliament will only affect countries in the European Union. However, elements of many European Parliament legislation often show up within a few years in the laws of other countries around the world. The latest law should be a warning to genealogists. The 438 to 226 vote, described as “the worst possible outcome” by some quarters, could have significant repercussions on the way we use the Internet. Quoting from an article on Slashdot: “The most controversial component of the plan mandates that any website that lets users upload text, sounds, images, code, or other copyrighted works for public consumption (read: most of them) would need to employ automated copyright systems that filter these submissions against a database of copyrighted works at the website owner’s expense.” And: “Unsurprisingly, these parts of the bill have been met with opposition from digital rights groups, computer scientists, academics, platforms such as Wikipedia and even human rights groups.” Details may be found at: HTTPS://tinyurl.com/y6vpshhf. ========================================== Thank you Jane [If I have sent this already, sorry. Sally] I had to reach out and ask if you get Randy Majors newsletter. Very recently he mentioned 2 new overlay programs (I don’t know what they are actually called) that are wonderful helps. The 1st is Historical US County Boundary Maps: https://www.randymajors.com/p/maps.html and the 2nd is NEW! County Lines on Google Maps: https://www.randymajors.com/p/countygmap.html . The group might not know about them yet. ========================================== Make a Translation “Cheat Sheet” Do you often work with records written in Latin, German, Hungarian, Italian, or other languages? Creating a quick reference document in a table or spreadsheet can save you the time of going to a dictionary or using online translation programs. Start with common genealogy words or phrases in the language of the original record you are viewing and their English equivalents (for example, Baptism Records in English would be Kereszteltek Anyakönyve in Hungarian, Matricula Baptisatorum in Latin). You can use FamilySearch Word Lists as a guide or add those you come across in your own research. By Lisa Alzo, Internet Genealogy and Your Genealogy Today author ==========================================

    10/30/2018 10:42:44
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List -- 7 Tips to find English or Welsh ancestors AND A European origin for leprosy?
    2. Sally Pavia
    3. FamilyHistoryResearcher.com Nick Thorne 7 Tips to find English or Welsh ancestors Wills before 1858 Finding your English or Welsh ancestors’ wills before 1858 in the Church courts Before 1858 there was an intricate system of probate courts in existence coming under the jurisdiction of the church. It befell to these ecclesiastical courts, ranging from Bishop’s courts to Archdeacon’s courts and some Peculiar courts, to grant probate on the last will and testament of our English and Welsh forebears. If someone was particularly wealthy, or they had goods in more than one diocese or jurisdiction, then probate would be granted by the Prerogative Court of Canterbury, for the southern province of the country, or the Prerogative Court of York for the Northern province. Where the testator had goods in both the north and southern province then the PCC granted probate. The copies of the wills for the Prerogative Court of Canterbury are held at The National Archives in Kew while the Prerogative Court of York is at the Borthwick Institute. This short video is intended to introduce you to the subject of pre-1858 English/Welsh wills, but to find out more there is a lesson on the subject within the Family History Researcher course on English and Welsh family history (links in the tabs at the top of the page). The best way to discover the records of your ancestors is to learn as much as you can about the hundreds of records, data research sites and various archives that there are by taking a genealogy course. Nick, The Nosey Genealogist has a really useful blog packed with family history tips and also various learning material. His extremely well-received family history course – that can quickly put you back on track – is available from a link above. Please share this video: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__youtu.be_vjgi1NPxw7c&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=2E9S6K3MZ8wwF_WNyWeZgRWqd1BGjDunAOa0whr833k&s=xGpCgO5YA1tZ59k_fbwvp1GwmuxNW4EPEtGEeIpmIwU&e= =================================================== Archaeology News Network A European origin for leprosy? May 10, 2018 New research by an international team including scientists from the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History, the University of Tübingen, EPFL Lausanne and the University of Zurich has revealed that there was much more diversity in the leprosy strains circulating in Medieval Europe than previously thought. This finding, based on the sequencing of 10 new ancient genomes from the leprosy-causing bacterium Mycobacterium leprae, complicates prior assumptions about the origin and spread of the disease, and also includes the oldest M. Leprae genome sequenced to date, from about 400 AD in the United Kingdom. Read more at: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__preview.tinyurl.com_yaej3o4p&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=2E9S6K3MZ8wwF_WNyWeZgRWqd1BGjDunAOa0whr833k&s=Zh4Nr4EIFButYOCROMKe8Mgpa2VZlDx2cCYIptpVlwA&e= Sally Rolls Pavia [email protected] List Owner: [email protected] "Soldiers do not die until they are forgotten." "Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to

    09/30/2018 01:58:53
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List; dated 28 Sep 2018 ~~ 6 Items
    2. DID YOU KNOW? 25 Sep 2018 To Restore Civil Society, Start With the Library This crucial institution is being neglected just when we need it the most. By Eric Klinenberg Mr. Klinenberg is a sociologist Sept. 8, 2018 Is the public library obsolete? A lot of powerful forces in society seem to think so. In recent years, declines in the circulation of bound books in some parts of the country have led prominent critics to argue that libraries are no longer serving their historical function. Countless elected officials insist that in the 21st century — when so many books are digitized, so much public culture exists online and so often people interact virtually — libraries no longer need the support they once commanded. Libraries are already starved for resources. In some cities, even affluent ones like Atlanta, entire branches are being shut down. In San Jose, Calif., just down the road from Facebook, Google and Apple, the public library budget is so tight that users with overdue fees above $20 aren’t allowed to borrow books or use computers. For the remainder of the article: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_y954kdf9&d=DwICAw&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=fY56U9Wj1jUM89mkp7_YxLZi3o7AuUvdmp9NUsPql7Q&s=DQuZaV2P7ih9lIW2yzA8IZOOYdm_12j_XxxpT0E-Ur4&e= ========================================== Black Poppies: Writing About Britain's Black Servicemen During WWI By Andria Williams "The First World War is usually viewed as a predominantly white conflict," writes historian Stephen Bourne in his book Black Poppies: Britain's Black Community and the Great War. Writer Andria Williams found this to be true as she began research for her next novel featuring a WWI black British soldier. This week at WWrite, Williams shares her exploration into this little-known aspect of WWI history that she aims to bring to light in her fictional work. A military spouse, Williams is the author of The Longest Night, a scintillating debut novel about a young couple whose marriage is tested when they move to an army base rife with love triangles, life-or-death conflicts, and a dramatic cover-up. Read this unique post about navigating between historical facts and the creative craft of writing fiction. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_yc4uvyxt&d=DwICAw&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=fY56U9Wj1jUM89mkp7_YxLZi3o7AuUvdmp9NUsPql7Q&s=ODnojWVODM2U8NFPgq-wWdc6vVNHZZWVSKWWBQTQyOI&e= ========================================== Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter European Parliament Votes in Favor of Controversial Copyright Laws By Dick Eastman, dated September 12, 2018 At this time, the new, restrictive copyright law passed Monday by the European Parliament will only affect countries in the European Union. However, elements of many European Parliament legislation often show up within a few years in the laws of other countries around the world. The latest law should be a warning to genealogists. The 438 to 226 vote, described as “the worst possible outcome” by some quarters, could have significant repercussions on the way we use the Internet. Quoting from an article on Slashdot: “The most controversial component of the plan mandates that any website that lets users upload text, sounds, images, code, or other copyrighted works for public consumption (read: most of them) would need to employ automated copyright systems that filter these submissions against a database of copyrighted works at the website owner’s expense.” And: “Unsurprisingly, these parts of the bill have been met with opposition from digital rights groups, computer scientists, academics, platforms such as Wikipedia and even human rights groups.” Details may be found at: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=HTTPS-3A__tinyurl.com_y6vpshhf&d=DwICAw&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=fY56U9Wj1jUM89mkp7_YxLZi3o7AuUvdmp9NUsPql7Q&s=LC8BlQMrOSCVKYChsXKU1HmVrhI_7AdfKy5Rx-LqiIU&e=. ========================================== Thank you Jane [If I have sent this already, sorry. Sally] I had to reach out and ask if you get Randy Majors newsletter. Very recently he mentioned 2 new overlay programs (I don’t know what they are actually called) that are wonderful helps. The 1st is Historical US County Boundary Maps: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.randymajors.com_p_maps.html&d=DwICAw&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=fY56U9Wj1jUM89mkp7_YxLZi3o7AuUvdmp9NUsPql7Q&s=vPcRXt6LilB7fEE0a39tGVqrRt3gpD6TJoUIRKfh_vg&e= and the 2nd is NEW! County Lines on Google Maps: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.randymajors.com_p_countygmap.html&d=DwICAw&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=fY56U9Wj1jUM89mkp7_YxLZi3o7AuUvdmp9NUsPql7Q&s=tElrRvGkMLXeOAStzm7BnG5USKcqwyGQgppAZiVeTSc&e= The group might not know about them yet. ========================================== Make a Translation “Cheat Sheet” Do you often work with records written in Latin, German, Hungarian, Italian, or other languages? Creating a quick reference document in a table or spreadsheet can save you the time of going to a dictionary or using online translation programs. Start with common genealogy words or phrases in the language of the original record you are viewing and their English equivalents (for example, Baptism Records in English would be Kereszteltek Anyakönyve in Hungarian, Matricula Baptisatorum in Latin). You can use FamilySearch Word Lists as a guide or add those you come across in your own research. By Lisa Alzo, Internet Genealogy and Your Genealogy Today author

    09/28/2018 11:02:49
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List, Saturday, Sep 22 4 pieces
    2. DID YOU KNOW? 21 Sep 2018 To Restore Civil Society, Start With the Library This crucial institution is being neglected just when we need it the most. By Eric Klinenberg Mr. Klinenberg is a sociologist Sept. 8, 2018 Is the public library obsolete? A lot of powerful forces in society seem to think so. In recent years, declines in the circulation of bound books in some parts of the country have led prominent critics to argue that libraries are no longer serving their historical function. Countless elected officials insist that in the 21st century — when so many books are digitized, so much public culture exists online and so often people interact virtually — libraries no longer need the support they once commanded. Libraries are already starved for resources. In some cities, even affluent ones like Atlanta, entire branches are being shut down. In San Jose, Calif., just down the road from Facebook, Google and Apple, the public library budget is so tight that users with overdue fees above $20 aren’t allowed to borrow books or use computers. For the remainder of the article: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_y954kdf9&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=LLnRwhrBhGHU26Z4ENMOtpdIJNkiuHayekt8CN5kpTE&s=iMa3ql7_WF5vUKhWDypReTylCyEADku8eN6v5mOXK2o&e= ========================================== Black Poppies: Writing About Britain's Black Servicemen During WWI By Andria Williams "The First World War is usually viewed as a predominantly white conflict," writes historian Stephen Bourne in his book Black Poppies: Britain's Black Community and the Great War. Writer Andria Williams found this to be true as she began research for her next novel featuring a WWI black British soldier. This week at WWrite, Williams shares her exploration into this little-known aspect of WWI history that she aims to bring to light in her fictional work. A military spouse, Williams is the author of The Longest Night, a scintillating debut novel about a young couple whose marriage is tested when they move to an army base rife with love triangles, life-or-death conflicts, and a dramatic cover-up. Read this unique post about navigating between historical facts and the creative craft of writing fiction. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_yc4uvyxt&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=LLnRwhrBhGHU26Z4ENMOtpdIJNkiuHayekt8CN5kpTE&s=3YM8TPuHiCanJyVDkO08uNScQYCxLSU9D6itAl8S_8I&e= ========================================== Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter European Parliament Votes in Favor of Controversial Copyright Laws By Dick Eastman, dated September 12, 2018 At this time, the new, restrictive copyright law passed Monday by the European Parliament will only affect countries in the European Union. However, elements of many European Parliament legislation often show up within a few years in the laws of other countries around the world. The latest law should be a warning to genealogists. The 438 to 226 vote, described as “the worst possible outcome” by some quarters, could have significant repercussions on the way we use the internet. Quoting from an article on Slashdot: “The most controversial component of the plan mandates that any website that lets users upload text, sounds, images, code, or other copyrighted works for public consumption (read: most of them) would need to employ automated copyright systems that filter these submissions against a database of copyrighted works at the website owner’s expense.” and: “Unsurprisingly, these parts of the bill have been met with opposition from digital rights groups, computer scientists, academics, platforms such as Wikipedia and even human rights groups.” Details may be found at: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_y6vpshhf&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=LLnRwhrBhGHU26Z4ENMOtpdIJNkiuHayekt8CN5kpTE&s=LyGOns0cMcky5zfCdi7X7yMzg9RZY64s2ON9a46zrNw&e=. ========================================== Thank you Jane [If I have sent this already, sorry. Sally] I had to reach out and ask if you get Randy Majors newsletter. Very recently he mentioned 2 new overlay programs (I don’t know what they are actually called) that are wonderful helps. The 1st is Historical US County Boundary Maps: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.randymajors.com_p_maps.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=LLnRwhrBhGHU26Z4ENMOtpdIJNkiuHayekt8CN5kpTE&s=bl7IbJGYWuyjUxvmUoDKOwsUAb-C8A-enFDPGEG7zCc&e= and the 2nd is NEW! County Lines on Google Maps: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.randymajors.com_p_countygmap.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=LLnRwhrBhGHU26Z4ENMOtpdIJNkiuHayekt8CN5kpTE&s=mfQsXIJN_bzRu86XBZ-sqgjI6enXTt8n3zjfgg6l5q0&e= . The group might not know about them yet. Sally Rolls Pavia [email protected] "Soldiers do not die until they are forgotten."

    09/22/2018 08:30:50
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List, dated 7 Sept 2018
    2. How do I obtain access to PA State Archives records on Ancestry.com? Free access to Ancestry.com Pennsylvania is available to Pennsylvania State residents. This access requires a free Ancestry.com Pennsylvania account. To begin, enter your zip code in the form at the bottom of this page, and you will receive a link to the Ancestry.com Pennsylvania search page. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__www.phmc.pa.gov_Archives_Research-2DOnline_Pages_Ancestry-2DPA.aspx&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=-m9ErAJUw0Eo2F9wQO69hP-0iSpkwQAFzqPaBh7vX9Y&s=0f5XD6Ktal1JsF1ji7ZaBcm4l-VOp2DoIny9rQMlOS8&e= --------------------------------------------- From Family History Daily Google Maps Will Help You Learn More About Your Ancestors By Jodi Bash Have you ever taken a really long road trip? The kind that takes days to get where you’re going? It’s not as common anymore with cheap, safe air travel. Map Out Your Ancestors for Free You don’t need to spend money on software to map your ancestors travels. I started with Google maps. Jodi says, the first time I used it was when I was transcribing the diary that my grandparents kept during the first year of their marriage; May 1934-May 1935. [I have already read the article and it’s really fun and very informative. Give it a read. Sally] https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__familyhistorydaily&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=-m9ErAJUw0Eo2F9wQO69hP-0iSpkwQAFzqPaBh7vX9Y&s=0wi9XvlmtTGsqVeS20z8J2KZN56QkuT9emgFeKK9XG8&e= com/genealogy-help-and-how-to/google-maps-will-help-learn-ancestors/ --------------------------------------------- Weymouth ways and Weymouth people Dennis Edward Hunt's "Weymouth ways and Weymouth people: Reminiscences" takes the reader back in Weymouth Massachusetts past to the 1830s through the 1880s as he provides glimpses into the people of the community. These reminiscences were mostly printed in the Weymouth Gazette and provide a fair example of early New England village life as it occurred in the mid-1800s. Of specific interest to the genealogist will be the Hunt material scattered throughout, but most specifically 286-295, and of course, those lucky enough to have had somebody "remembered" by Edward. Read more of this post  Sally Rolls Pavia [email protected] List Owner: [email protected] "Soldiers do not die until they are forgotten." "Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many.”

    09/07/2018 07:03:48
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Did You Know? dated Aug 28, 2018 - hope this isn't a duplicate
    2. DID YOU KNOW? 28 Aug 2018 Doughboys and Doughnut Girls – How the Salvation Army’s World War I Women Volunteers Made History, One Tasty Treat at a Time By George Yagi, Jr. via the Military History Now web site In the summer of 1917, the first U.S. troops landed in France. Accompanying them was a contingent of volunteers from another, much smaller army – the Salvation Army. All told, 250 young women joined the charity to travel with the American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) to Europe. The organization’s 52-year-old firebrand matron, Evangeline Booth, tenaciously lobbied a reluctant U.S. General John Pershing to allow her volunteers to provide aid and support to the soldiers at the front. Eventually, he agreed. Salvation Army “Lassies” at the frontlines in WW1 fried up doughnuts by the thousands for American soldiers. The tireless efforts of these “Doughnut Girls” not only provided a morale-boosting treat for troops in the trenches, they helped popularize the now-ubiquitous snack food. Each member of Booth’s brigade carried a helmet, a gas mask and a .45 caliber revolver. The women soon found themselves in the trenches where they would serve as nurses, relief workers, and, most famously, as “Doughnut Girls.” Amazingly, this celebrated nickname came about by pure happenstance, thanks to a pair of Booth’s volunteers — Ensigns Helen Purviance and Margaret Sheldon. The two were stationed with U.S troops at Montiers-sur-Saulx in October of 1917. The soldiers manning the lines there had endured 36 days of constant rain. As morale plummeted, Purviance and Sheldon figured that some tasty baked goods would lift everyone’s spirits. After looking over the meager supplies available, the young women decided to try to make a batch of doughnuts. At the time, the now-ubiquitous fried-dough snack was available in some stateside cities, but it was still largely unknown to most Americans. With a blanket concealing their kitchen from prying eyes, the two ensigns went to work. Equipped with only a very small pot-bellied stove, Purviance later recalled, “I was literally on my knees when those first doughnuts were fried, seven at a time, in a small frypan.” Continuing their work into the early morning hours, the pair eventually whipped up 150 doughnuts. They were an instant hit. The first soldier to receive one of the sweet treats was Private Braxton Zuber. “Oh, boy!” he reportedly exclaimed. “If this is war, let it continue.” The following day, Purviance and Sheldon, made a fresh batch of doughnuts – 300 this time. All were devoured by grateful infantrymen. Word quickly spread and soldiers up and down the line were clamoring for more of the fried treats. Eventually, Purviance would find herself making as many as 8,000 doughnuts a day. If you would like to see what these lovely ladies looked like, here is the URL: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_y9pbqchf&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=j3Qfnpw6188-16SgWVVYTcmE3lLGGtxVPFgZC2K-TCI&s=VwyWJ8UNZSpQvJdaXkkEmI5iMLDvzuHi2HaN7nvcVzs&e= ===================================================================== Runaway Connecticut from Dick Eastman’s Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter, dated 4 Jun 2018 Runaway Connecticut is an online database with a selection of the runaway notices that appeared in the Connecticut Courant between 1765 and 1820. Not only do the ads look for runaway slaves, but also a variety of runaway apprentices, deserting soldiers, escaped prisoners, and dissatisfied husbands and wives. Think you might find any of your ancestors listed? https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__wesomeka.wesleyan.edu_runawayct_&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=j3Qfnpw6188-16SgWVVYTcmE3lLGGtxVPFgZC2K-TCI&s=0r9-5p6NXzKG4rGh4zyN_6GbxN5GV6n8RVD8_qsscbI&e=

    08/28/2018 09:32:58
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] NOTE FROM SALLY Re: password log in on website
    2. Hi Donna, Your password is the last four digits of your phone number. The first number you put in is the last four numbers of your member number: 2146 Phone number: XXXX Hope this is helpful. If I can help with anything else, just give me a yell. Sally Rolls Pavia [email protected] West Valley Genealogical Society 602 550-1807 "Soldiers do not die until they are forgotten." "Do not regret growing older. It is a privilege denied to many.”   My name is Donna Scott, member number 12222146. My old computer remembered my password to get into the website. But, I can't find where I wrote it down. So can't login on my new computer. The website to contact the membership director. Please pass this information on and let me know how to reset my password. Thanks Donna Scott

    08/27/2018 04:41:53
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] The Lead Crosses Controversy: Did The Romans Discover Tucson?
    2. For you folk that are in the Phoenix area, or will be here in April 2019. Know this is an early notification BUT, sounds interesting so thought I'd send it along so anyone that is interesting could put it on their calendar. I've already signed up on it. Personally, didn't know Romans would have been this far from home, never know though. The Lead Crosses Controversy: Did The Romans Discover Tucson? Public · Hosted by The First Families of Arizona Tuesday, April 30, 2019, at 10 AM - 1 PM Roman and Jewish Masonic Artifacts Dated to Around 800 A.D. Found in Tuscon, Arizona In 1924, a disabled veteran of World War I and history buff, Charles E. Manier took his family out for a Sunday drive along Silverbell Road in the Tuscon, Arizona area when he decided to stop in order to check out an old, abandoned lime kiln. That is when Manier saw something protruding from the enbankment. He then retrieved a shovel from his car and proceeded to unearth an ancient sixty-two pound riveted lead cross that was actually two lead crosses riveted together. All together, Manier discovered from 31-32 lead objects between 1924 and 1930. The objects consisted of crosses, swords and ritual items, many of which were inscribed in both Latin and Hebrew. They are known as the Tucson artifacts, sometimes called the Tucson Lead Crosses, Tucson Crosses, Silverbell Road artifacts, or Silverbell artifacts. After his find, Manier took the cross to Professor Frank H. Fowler, Head of the Department of Classical Languages at the University of Arizona, at Tucson, who determined the language on the artifacts was Latin. He also translated one line as reading, “Calalus, the unknown land”, from which the name of the supposed Latin colony was garnered. Interested in more information? https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__gnosticwarrior.com_roman-2Dand-2Djewish-2Dartifacts-2Dtuscon-2Darizona.html&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=PMkqQsc85qa8XWOc1kdaw_ZlgH8rJMg6KySj0ysFl-Q&s=ko6Y5nWRLqE53OdglPYMVL5FD59lo9A94bDONeu-SOY&e=

    08/23/2018 11:02:54
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List, August 23
    2. DID YOU KNOW? Seven Facts About Your Ancestors Found in Obituaries and Death Notices 1. Date of death, the name of cemetery, date, and place of the funeral and burial 2. Name, place, and year of birth 3. Names of children, where they lived, and their position in the family’s birth order 4. Names of the towns and how long they lived in each one 5. Age of spouse at death and how long ago that was 6. Details on the longevity of parents and grandparents 7. Count of descendants, by generation ======================================= Mysterious 6,500-year-old Culture in Israel Was Brought by Migrants, Researchers Say Genetic analysis shows ancient Galilean farmers warmly embraced blue-eyed, fair-skinned immigrants from Iran and Turkey in the late Copper Age By Ariel David, dated Aug 20, 2018 Around 6,500 years ago, an advanced new culture surfaced in what is today Israel. Spectacular pottery, exquisite tools and enigmatic works of art appeared, seemingly out of nowhere. The culture would flourish for about 600 years during the late Copper Age, then disappear as inexplicably as it arose. Now archaeologists believe they have deduced its origins: migrants from across the Middle East and Eurasia, who were actually warmly welcomed by local farmers. At least one of these outsider peoples seems to have included blue-eyed, fair-skinned immigrants, according to a paper published Monday in the journal Nature Communications. These conclusions are based on the analysis of DNA extracted from the bones of these nearly-forgotten people, found in a burial cave uncovered in the mid-1990s in Peki’in, a village in the Western Galilee. Comparing their DNA to other samples from previous and later periods, and to samples from different regions, showed that the ancient ‘Peki’inese’ were an admixture between local populations and two additional groups: one from Anatolia or northern Mesopotamia, and one from Iran, the Nature paper says. Eye-color and skin tone aren’t controlled by single genes: they are genetically complex. But it can be said that gene variants associated with blue eye-color in Europeans, and light skin, appeared among these ancient immigrants, suggesting that baby blues were possibly even common among them. In other words, the genome analysis doesn’t prove that blue-eyed migrants flocked in, but it strongly indicates as much. Want to read the rest of this interesting story? https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_y8wkuvf3&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=A_6LpeB8DPBv9yB8N7V7ZwEBJeMKmJFge8uPOLjfPvs&s=LfUFbYUMojD0Tgc6hO6WtW9_ZsFdvD5l91zXVFZLA6Q&e= ======================================= This one is new to me, know absolutely nothing about it – Sally Introducing: HomeDNA Food & Pet Sensitivity DNA Test Get reliable, actionable answer answers from your DNA! Do you ever get an upset stomach, gas, diarrhea, or feel sleepy after eating? Do you suddenly have itchy eyes or difficulty breathing and suspect you might be sensitive to your new kitten’s dander? In your search for answers, the HomeDNA Food & Pet Sensitivity DNA test is a great place to start. We’re very excited about the newest addition to our high-quality suite of at-home DNA tests and are confident it can help you and your family members get the answers you need to live a more comfortable life. https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_y9q36xbk&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=A_6LpeB8DPBv9yB8N7V7ZwEBJeMKmJFge8uPOLjfPvs&s=vRzYmTVAxxcUQpto44W8vO1cUS6ngnO0f8QvMUPVW4o&e= ======================================= Monumental 5,000-year-old Graveyard Found in Kenya Archaeologists believe a giant cemetery near Lake Turkana was built by egalitarian nomads who buried their dead without distinction of rank By Ruth Schuster, dated Aug 20, 2018 Nomads weren’t supposed to have had the capacity to create monumental construction, nor of course were prehistoric shepherds living in classless societies, but apparently, some of them weren’t told that. Archaeologists have unearthed a 30-meter (100-foot) high burial mound surrounded by boulder-like rocks — megaliths — and rock circles near Lake Turkana in Kenya that date back about 5,000 years. Used from 5,000 years ago to 4,300 years ago, the Lothagam North Pillar site is the earliest known cemetery of its type in eastern Africa, the researchers wrote in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday. The archaeologists believe that the cemetery was created by an egalitarian society of nomadic shepherds, in contrast to the common assumption in archaeological circles that only settled, orderly and hierarchical societies could build such huge things. Want more information: https://urldefense.proofpoint.com/v2/url?u=https-3A__tinyurl.com_ycwoqluq&d=DwIFaQ&c=kKqjBR9KKWaWpMhASkPbOg&r=ZOz-LyP_5a3qk-EmMbua4Z7KEr_swJkD3SQ0kpI83tdUaeq8BkmPHoxM9_aDoWTA&m=A_6LpeB8DPBv9yB8N7V7ZwEBJeMKmJFge8uPOLjfPvs&s=rDOwduiJk74JnH-fhKxiRHAYq2LTylw9fRtiZW1zgzg&e= ======================================= Sally Rolls Pavia [email protected] Sun City, AZ

    08/23/2018 08:45:07
  1. 08/23/2018 08:28:23
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing Li t -- Did You Know
    2. SALLY PAVIA
    3. DID YOU KNOW? 8 Aug 2018 -------- How to Use the Internet Archive's Wayback Machine https://www.wikihow.com/Use-the-Internet-Archive%27s-Wayback-Machine https://www.wikihow.com/Use-the-Internet-Archive's-Wayback-Machine https://www.wikihow.com/Use-the-Internet-Archive's-Wayback-Machine Have you wondered what a website looked like in the past? Wish you could see Microsoft.com when Windows XP was released? Well, you can! The Wayback Machine contains a large collection of sites saved from the past. Read this article to learn how to use it. ======================================================= Myths of History: Was Napoleon Bonaparte Short? by Dave Ray, Aug 5, 2018, in the Vintage News The power of images and propaganda is real. They have the strength to shape the views of entire civilizations and the influence to become embedded in the national psyche for centuries. For instance, when the average person thinks of Napoleon Bonaparte, most likely a few key images come to mind. The oddly iconic hat, a hidden hand tucked into his military uniform, and the fact that he was short. A short Napoleon has become such an ingrained part of Western history and culture that even a complete psychological profile was named for it. If someone has a “Napoleon complex” it means trying to overcompensate for their short stature by exaggerated assertiveness and embellished bellicosity. The idea has come down to us that Napoleon tried to conquer Europe in order to make up for his lack of height. For the rest of the story: https://tinyurl.com/y7nv2ddz ======================================================= Teenage Corpse from the 1960’s Turned out to be Rare Iron Age Discovery by Magda Origjanska https://www.thevintagenews.com/author/magda-origjanska/ , dated Aug 6, 2018, from “the Vintage News” The year 2000 remembers the peculiar case of finding the remains of a young woman aged between 16 and 20 years, after a harvesting machine accidentally cut her body into hundred pieces. The machine was being used to harvest peat from a bog near the city of Hanover in Lower Saxony, Germany. During the summer of that same year, the new analysis revealed that the remains were an archaeological artifact which dated to around 650 BC. The corpse was determined to be a bog body of a girl who was thus called “The Girl of the Uchter Moor.” For the rest of this very interesting story: https://tinyurl.com/ybtrkx3h ======================================================= The Macabre Story of Sin-Eaters [I’ve sent out stories about Sin-Eaters before. Sally] by Domagoj Valjak https://www.thevintagenews.com/author/domagoj-valjak/ , dated Aug 6, 2018, from “the Vintage News” Since at least the early 1600’s and all the way to the earliest years of the 20th century, “sin-eating”, a rather macabre profession that arose from folklore legends and peculiar supernatural beliefs, was a common line of work across the rural areas of the British Isles. Grieving family members of the recently deceased would pay the village sin-eaters to rid their departed loved ones from all the sins they had accumulated during their lives, and the sin-eaters would then perform an eerie ritual that supposedly allowed the dead to enter Heaven. While eating, the sin-eater would recite a special prayer: “I give easement and rest now to thee, dear man. Come not down the lanes or in our meadows. And, for thy peace, I pawn my own soul. Amen.” For the remainder of the story: https://tinyurl.com/ycfppb6d ======================================================= =======================================================

    08/11/2018 10:31:34
    1. [GENEALOGYBITSANDPIECES] Genealogy Bits and Pieces Mailing List - Grave robbers steal bones from Miami's historic cemeteries AND Muskegon County Genealogical Society Holds Ceremony and Provides Headstones for Children Buried in Unmarked Graves AND South C
    2. Sally Rolls Pavia
    3. DID YOU KNOW? Miami-Dade County Grave robbers steal bones from Miami's historic cemeteries By Linda Robertson, Miami Herald [email protected] June 06, 2018 08:16 AM Updated June 06, 2018 10:54 PM At first glance, a tree branch appears to have fallen into the coffin. The lid has been pried off, leaving the contents roasting, naked, in the Miami sun. “No, that’s a leg bone. See where the foot used to be?” said Arthur Kennedy, bending down to take a closer look at the smooth, brown, contoured tibia. Kennedy would know. He’s not a forensic scientist but he is a cemetery caretaker — who lives in the middle of a cemetery — and he’s recently seen more bones than he cares to remember. “Here’s his belt,” Kennedy said, pointing to a rotting black strap hanging off the side, a remnant of the dignity of the dead man when he was buried in his Sunday best. At Lincoln Memorial Park, burial place of some of Miami’s most prominent black leaders, three graves — including one of a child — were broken into and ransacked two months ago. Kennedy, who lives in the small office at the center of the 10-acre Lincoln property in Brownsville, nightly chases away drug addicts, homeless people, prostitutes, vandals, bone burglars and Santeria worshippers who deposit offerings of slain chickens, fruit, candy, cigars and coins. “I got shot once. Guy pulled a gun on me when I told him to get out,” said Kennedy, rolling up his shorts to show a scar on his thigh. “I might pick up 18 chickens in one day. I’ve picked up a boar’s head, a dead monkey, dead rabbits, apples, a birthday cake. We got some serious voodoo and hocus pocus out here.” Read more here: https://tinyurl.com/y97st63y ================================================= Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter Muskegon County Genealogical Society Holds Ceremony and Provides Headstones for Children Buried in Unmarked Graves Dick Eastman · May 31, 2018 Seventy-two children buried in unmarked graves in the Shady Rest cemetery in Muskegon, Michigan are receiving new headstones and will be remembered a special ceremony today. The Muskegon County Genealogical Society over a year ago approached the county’s board of commissioner with the idea of making May Cemetery Awareness Month. When the board approved the request, the society quickly got to work restoring and cleaning up cemeteries and grave sites throughout the county. “We are doing a cemetery project for the Muskegon County Genealogical Society,” said Bill Hansen, cemetery committee chairman. “We are attempting to map all of the cemeteries in the county into an interactive mapping system, and we have done seventeen so far, and as part of that we sort of unofficial adopted this cemetery to work on.” Since May 2017, they have raised 255 headstones, repaired entrance gates, painted metalwork, and planted flowers. You can read the full story in an article in the Fox 17 Online web site at: http://bit.ly/2LJtcZ4. Comment from Newsletter: I would hope other genealogy societies would copy this example of “doing the right thing” for deceased persons. What is YOUR society doing? ================================================= South Carolina Department of Archives and History Announces Digitization Of Over 11,000 Revolutionary War Records Columbia, S.C. – The South Carolina Department of Archives and History (SCDAH) is pleased to announce that the records series “Accounts Audited of Claims Growing out of the Revolution in South Carolina 1775-1856” is now active and images are available on the Online Records Index. This record consists of 11,170 documents presented by citizens to the treasury in support of claims for military service, supplies, and other contributions rendered during the latter part of the Revolutionary War. Most of the files contain an auditor’s cover paper, which includes the name of claimant, a brief description of their service provided, and the amount of their claim and its adjusted value. Additionally, if an indent was issued, its number and the claimant’s signature verifying its receipt were also included as well as receipts and affidavits to the validity of the claim. Over the last six months, the SCDAH completed the process of adding these records to the Online Records Index. Our greatest appreciation goes to the Southern Revolutionary War Institute and Mr. Michael Scoggins for providing the images to the agency. Mr. Scoggins was instrumental in having the images scanned through a grant funded to the Southern Revolutionary War Institute from the National Park Service. Scoggins is the historian for the Culture & Heritage Museums in York County and research director of the Southern Revolutionary War Institute. This series is one of the most requested records series at the SCDAH. Records such as audited accounts are vital resources for genealogists and historians. Having a series as valuable and expansive available in a digital format is a milestone for any individual with South Carolina ancestry. To view the record series, please visit the Online Records Index (http://www archivesindex.SC.gov/). After opting to enter the Index, use the Advanced Search option, choose the Record Group “Combined Index to Records Series, 1675-1929” and the Series “ S108092: Accounts Audited of Claims Growing Out of the Revolution.” For questions about this series, please contact us at 803-896-0339 or [email protected] About the South Carolina Department of Archives and History The South Carolina Department of Archives and History is an independent state agency whose mission is to preserve and promote the documentary and cultural heritage of the Palmetto State. The department houses one of the most comprehensive state archival collections in the nation, spanning more than 325 years of South Carolina history. ================================================= The Daily Online Genealogy Newsletter Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter, dated 20, 2018 Locate My Name – a Distribution of Names Across Regions Want to find where people having your last name are found? Locate My Name is a web site that promises to help you find distribution of names across countries and regions. The site mainly focuses on surnames, because more people with the same surname in a place, means something: either those people are in the region since long ago and the name originates from there or nearby, or members of the same family for some reason relocated there. The Locate My Name website is mainly used for finding origins of names, curiosity, entertainment and genealogy research. Data from many countries is available, including: Argentina, Austria, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Germany, Hungary, Latvia, Moldova, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, the United States of America, and more. The statistics are very reliable for some countries but not so good for others, primarily because of the quality of public records varies from one country to another. The information about surnames is derived from electoral rolls, birth records, census, and similar publicly-available information. There is good data about: the USA, Canada, and many European countries. However, there is poor to no data about: China, Iran, India and most of the African countries. The searches are quick and easy. A search for my own surname displays the following results: CA = 1392 NY = 873 MI = 866 FL = 774 WA = 670 TX = 652 MN = 531 MA = 517 IL = 447 PA = 360 I had no idea the Eastman name was so popular in California! I also found it interesting that the Locate My Name site also lists web sites that have the surname in the URL, such as: http://bankofeastman.com. You can find this and more at the Locate My Name web site at: http://www.locatemyname.com. ================================================= Barry L Gfeller Barry Gfeller, a man in Oregon spent over two decades taking pictures of nothing but buildings. When he died, he left his picture collection, over 50 000 items, to a local charity. They have since been purchased, and the new owner has made a Facebook page with a selection of the pictures. The old buildings are well worth seeing. I am from California, but used to visit my grandparents in Missouri. Some of those buildings really made me thing of the fun summers my sister and I had when we spent summers in Missouri, so years ago. Here is the website to see the buildings: http://gfellercollection.org/gallery/ =================================================

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