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    1. Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Black Minqua The Life and Times of Henry Green
    2. Anita Wills
    3. > > -- Black Minqua The Life and Times of Henry Green, is Non-Fiction and > based on the life of Henry Green. The setting is in Pre-Civil War > Southeastern Pennsylvania. Henry Green is a descendant of > Natives/blacks/whites who settled in the Mountains surrounding Lancaster > County Pennsylvania. On first contact Europeans referred to the Natives as > Minqua or Mingo, (People of the Muddy Water). They were the Natives who > lived near the Susquehanna River. Some were dark (Black) and others light > (White), thus they became Black or White Minqua. On 9/11/1851, Henry > becomes involved in an incident in which a white slave owner is killed, and > his life changed forever. He stood trial along with over thirty members of > his friends and family from the community. The event, known as "The > Christiana Resistance" was touted as a precursor to the Civil War by > Frederick Douglas. The book is a study on a period in American History in > which People of Color were afforded little or no rights, even in the North. > In this book Henry Green takes Center Stage as a man who, although free, > assisted escaping slaves. Just as his father before him Henry stood out and > left a historic footprint which we follow throughout this work. > > Black Minqua Amazon.com > <http://www.amazon.com/Black-Minqua-Times-Henry-Green/dp/1105524949/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1368039179&sr=8-1&keywords=black+minqua+the+life+and+times> > > [image: > http://static.lulu.com/browse/product_thumbnail.php?productId=20547322&resolution=320] >

    07/03/2013 02:32:52
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Welsh Mountain Family Gathering PA
    2. Anita Wills
    3. For those with Roots in Southeastern Pennsylvania; We are holding a Family Gathering on August 4, 2012, for descendants of the Green, Boots, Coleman, Stewart, Johnson, Martin, Nocho, Watson, Henson, and allied families. The event will take place at the Welsh Mountain Community Center, 564 Sandmine Road, New Holland Pennsylvania (Lancaster County PA). The Welsh Mountain Region of Pennsylvania, was an important part of the Underground Railroad. It was settled by Indians and Free Blacks, who were joined by disenfranchised whites. The community was isolated and cut off by the whites' who resided in the Valley. Although they were isolated several families had warrants and patents to the land. Henry Green was a participant in the Christiana Resistance (9/11/1851), in which a white slave owner was killed, by blacks. Thirty-eight of the blacks from the community were arrested and tried in Federal court for the murder. All of the men were eventually acquitted. Many of the men from the Mountains fought in the Civil War, and received no land or compensation. Over the years many have left the community and now the land they resided own, hosts million dollar homes. This is why we, As African Americans must continue to connect with our communities and keep our history alive. A book about this community will be on shelves soon, titled, Black Minqua: The Life and Times of Henry Green. For more information about the event and the history of the community check out, the Minqua Site. Minqua Website <http://minqua.ning.com> Anita Wills

    06/08/2012 05:06:40
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] June Family History Fair, 300th Luncheon, Heritage Park
    2. David A. French
    3. Hi All, We have updated the website.  We look forward to seeing you the first weekend in June. Please see below for links: 3rd Annual Family History Fair and Heritage Weekend Friday, June 1st * Saturday, June 2nd * Sunday, June 3rd The event will also include exhibits by area libraries, genealogical, historical, and cultural groups as well as family photo displays, kids’ history activities, door prizes, and a tea cup auction. The exhibits, displays, kids' activities, and beginning genealogy classes are free and open to the public. http://encfamilies.org/Family_History_Fair.html Friday, June 1st, 9 am to 5 pm * Exhibitors • Family Photo Boards * Six Family History Research Classes with the North Carolina State Archives and State Library will feature Debbi Blake, North Carolina Archives Public Services Supervisor; Chris Meekins, North Carolina State Archivist; Kay Tillotson, North Carolina State Library Genealogy Research Librarian; and Jefferson Currie, Native American Research Specialist.  Topics covered will include "Resources Available Onsite and Online at the North Carolina State Archives and Library", "Researching Revolutionary War, Civil War, African American, and Native American Ancestry." Saturday, June 2nd, 9 am to 5 pm * Exhibitors * Family Photo Boards * 300th Heritage Luncheon Featuring “The Civil War in ENC” Presentation by Mr. Chris Meekins, Archivist, NC State Archives, and the beautiful voices of The Heritage Chorale of Eastern North Carolina.  The luncheon menu includes Baked Ziti with Meat Sauce and Baked Chicken, Garden Salad, Garlic Bread, Strawberry & Blueberry Shortcake, and Coffee, Tea (Sweet/Unsweet), or Water. Veggie Pasta (Red or White Sauce) is also available. * Free Kids’ Event (9 am to Noon and 2 pm to 4pm):  Make Historical Crafts, Hear Stories, Pet an Alpaca (9a-12p), Sit on an Antique Tractor, and more Fun Activities! * Free Beginning Genealogy Classes at 10 am and 3pm include "How Do I Start My Family History?" by Barbara Ordione Kerr  sponsored by The Pamlico County Family History Library, Museum, and Heritage Center, "Getting the Most Out of the Federal Census Reports" by Carolyn Smith and Lois Gregory sponsored by The Craven County Genealogical Society, and "Researching DAR Records Online" by Lou Tate Walker and Carolyn Clemmer McCulley sponsored by The Richard Dobbs Spaight DAR Chapter. Sunday, June 3rd, 10am to 1pm * Heritage Park Brunch & Ground-Breaking Ceremony Enjoy a wonderful brunch which includes Scrambled Eggs, Bacon & Sausage Patties, Biscuits, Breakfast Gravy for Biscuits, Pancakes with Butter & Syrup, Cheesy Breakfast Potatoes, Sliced Fruit, and Coffee, Water, or Assorted Juices (Orange, Tomato and Grapefruit). • The Heritage Park Ground-Breaking Ceremony will take place at 2 pm at 300 Pollock Street at Craven Street at New Bern City Hall. Tickets and registration forms are available at the New Bern Riverfront Convention Center and the New Bern-Craven County Farmers’ Market.  More information and registration forms are also available online at www.ENCFamilies.org or by calling 252.349.0405.  We look forwarding to seeing everyone as we gather to celebrate Craven County's 300th Anniversary! Heritage Park Project Remember, Honor, and Celebrate Your Ancestors and Loved Ones In A Lasting Way http://encfamilies.org/Heritage_Park.html Volunteer to assist with the Family History Fair If you would like to help out with the Family History Fair for a few hours, we would be delighted to have you. * Assist with the Class Sign-In and Registration on Friday, June 1st from 7:30 am to 9 am. (1.5 hour shift) * Assist with Luncheon Sign-In on Saturday, June 2nd from 11:30 am to 12:30 pm. (1 hour shift) * Assist with Brunch Sign-In on Sunday, June 3rd from 10 am to 12 noon. (1 hour shift) * Assist with Welcome Table on Friday and Saturday from 8 am to 4 pm. (2 hour shifts) * Assist with the Kids' Event on Saturday, June 2nd from 8 am to 12 Noon and 2 pm to 4pm. (2 hour shifts) Each person assisting will receive a free Bear Town Bears Commemorative Calendar. If you would like to assist, please email us and let us know what you would like to do and when. All the Best, David The Family History Society of Eastern North Carolina www.encfamilies.org 252.349.0405 (Telephone)

    05/18/2012 02:22:25
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Getting Started Researching the 1940 Census For Free!
    2. David A. French
    3. Hi All, Today is a very exciting day. The 1940 Census is now available! Getting Started Researching the 1940 Census http://1940census.archives.gov/getting-started/ How to Access the 1940 Census in One Step by Stephen P. Morse, PhD & Joel D. Weintraub, PhD http://stevemorse.org/census/quiz.php Other sites are also in the process uploading the census images. They are: www.Ancestry.com www.Archives.com www.FamilySearch.org www.FindMyPast.com It may take a little while for the images to load as many people are on the 1940's Census website, but should get faster as the day goes along. Also, over 100,000 volunteers will begin working on producing the index. You may also join this indexing project. Visit https://the1940census.com/getting-started/ Happy Searching! David French The Family History Society of Eastern North Carolina www.encfamilies.org

    04/02/2012 03:24:29
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Cherokees expel descendants of slaves from tribe
    2. Saundra Brown
    3. Cherokees expel descendants of slaves from tribeBy JUSTIN JUOZAPAVICIUS - Associated Press | AP – 14 hrs ago TULSA, Okla. (AP) — One of the nation's largest American Indian tribes has sent letters to about 2,800 descendants of slaves once owned by its members, revoking their citizenship and cutting their medical care, food stipends, low-income homeowners' assistance and other services. The Cherokee Nation acted this week after its Supreme Court upheld the results of a 2007 special vote to amend the Cherokee constitution and remove the slaves' descendants and other non-Indians from tribal rolls. The 300,000-member tribe is the biggest in Oklahoma, although many of its members live elsewhere. Olive Anderson, 70, of Kansas City, Mo., called the letter she received "a slap in the face." "It tears me up to think they can attack my ancestors," Anderson said. The tribe never owned black slaves, but some individual members did. They were freed after the Civil War, in which the tribe allied with the Confederacy. An 1866 treaty between the tribe and the federal government gave the freedmen and their descendants "all the rights of native Cherokees." But more than 76 percent of Cherokee voters approved the amendment stripping the descendants of their citizenship. Tribal leaders who backed the amendment, including then-Principal Chief Chad Smith, said the vote was about the fundamental right of every government to determine its citizens, not about racial exclusion. The freedmen's descendants disagree. "It's a red man, black man issue just like it's a white man, black man issue," said Raymond Nash, 64, of Nowata. "It's embarrassing, really. It should have been over a long time ago." Along with losing services, Nash and other descendants of freedmen won't be able to vote in the hotly contested Sept. 24 election for principal chief that pits Smith against longtime tribal councilman Bill John Baker. The election is being held after the tribe's Supreme Court tossed out the results of a June election, saying it could not determine with a mathematical certainty who won. The results had flip-flopped between the two during weeks of counts and recounts. Baker had twice been declared winner, but so had Smith. "This definitely is a setback for our freedmen people because we were all eager to vote in the upcoming election," said Marilyn Vann, president of the Descendants of Freedmen of the Five Civilized Tribes. "The attitude is more like, 'We can't put them in chains, so we'll do anything we can to take away their rights.' It's a matter of racism and politics." Smith has supported the results of the 2007 voter-approved amendment. "I've consistently supported the Cherokee Nation's right to determine their own national identity," he said Friday. "Cherokees say this: We don't care what you look like, as long as you've got Cherokee blood. It's about identity and self-governance." Baker hasn't explicitly said he supports the amendment and the expulsion of the freedmen, but he issued a statement saying, "I respect the decision of the Cherokee people and believe fully in our right to self-govern." After Cherokee Supreme Court upheld the 2007 vote on Aug. 22, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development temporarily froze $33 million in funds while it studies the issue. Federal lawmakers who believe the amendment violated the freedmen's civil rights had lobbied federal agencies to cut funding to the tribe. Joe Crittenden, who is serving as acting principal chief until the new election is held, said the tribe, which has a $600 million budget, has enough money to carry it for "a few months" without cutting HUD-related services or jobs. Crittenden said Cherokee leaders have been having weekly conversations with the local and regional HUD offices. "We are confident that future federal funding will continue once the issues are resolved," he said. HUD referred questions to its local office, which did not respond to messages left by The Associated Press.

    09/09/2011 11:49:33
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] "The Black Side, " digitization of an old book about Atlanta GA
    2. Michael Emery
    3. >From Saundra Brown <saundra_b_2001@yahoo.com>, the University of Georgia has digitized the following book: Author: Carter, Edward Randolph Title: The Black Side; a partial history of the business, religious and educational side of the negro in Atlanta, Ga. Publisher: Atlanta, Ga., 1894. The book can be viewed online at this link: http://djvued.libs.uga.edu/E185x93xG4xC323/1f/black_side.pdf It includes biographical information on African Americans in Atlanta from about 1800 to 1894.

    01/16/2011 05:16:34
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] References to Slave Information for Cape of Good Hope in Africa
    2. Saundra Brown
    3. Mogamat Kamedien 'Cape Town - A Port City built by Slaves'  email : kammie@new.co.za  Co-Editor of the recent slave history publication : "BIBILIOGRAPHIES of BONDAGE" and independent slave historian Recommended website link : Gateway to colonial 'Slavery @ the Cape' of Good Hope in both Dutch and British South Africa Recommended website http://batavia.polresearch.org/slavery/ Recommended biblio website http://batavia.polresearch.org/slavery/bibliography.htm Alternative website link : Slavery Biblio 2004_05.doc <http://www.stamouers.com/SlaveryBiblio2004_2005.pdf>

    11/04/2010 08:28:37
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] New to the Group
    2. Anita Wills
    3. Greetings Everyone, My name is Anita and I am new to this group. This is to introduce myself and my interest in Genealogy. I have been doing research for over thirty years now, and have been blessed. I traced my maternal lines to Delaware, Maryland, Colonial Virginia, Pennsylvania, South Carolina. The information I found has so far filled two books, Notes and Dcouments of Free Persons of Color, and Pieces of the Quilt: The Mosaic of an African American Family. Both books detail my research and the Information I collected on my ancestors. My books are available through Amazon.com <http://amazon.com/>. I also have a radio show called, Anita Talks Genealogy, which airs on Blog Talk Radio. My show Airs Friday nights from 8:00-8:45 pm, (pst), every Friday. Anita Talks Genealogy <http://blogtalkradio.com/Anita-Wills> Another site I maintain is, the Minqua Site, which is about my Pennsylvania ancestors, who resided in the Welsh Mountains. Minqua <http://minqua.ning.com/> Prior to my researching our ancestors, the only information I had about our family history, came from my mother. She told me everything she knew, but she did not know everything. It was only by accident that I found the names of my ancestors and that they resided in Virginia. That was the one clue that set me off on a Journey that continues to this day. I connected to ancestors who were in the Revolutionary War, and ancestors who were Mulatto Servants to George Washington's Family, and to the Family of President James Monroe. For me finding these ancestors were like opening a can of worms, but it is my family's history. I like forward to sharing with everyone. Anita Wills

    08/11/2010 04:38:00
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Genealogical Society of South Africa, Western Cape Branch
    2. Steve Hayes
    3. Monthly Meeting Genealogical Society of South Africa, Western Cape Branch Date - Saturday 8 May Time - 14:00 Place - Goodwood Library Hall, Church Street, Goodwood Entrance - Free Speaker - Dr Matilda Burden Matilda is senior lecturer in cultural history at the University of Stellenbosch. She is also involved with the university's museum and communities wishing to establish heritage centres. One of her special fields of interest is South African place names. Topic - South African Place Names (Presentation in Afrikaans) A pot-pourrie of interesting aspects around place names, such as the changes, multi-language, origin, pronunciation and richness. Contact person - Chairman Andrew Kok 082 500 6758. Thank you Mariana Olivier GSSA, Western Cape Branch 021 557-4355 082 438 9591 -- Steve Hayes Web: http://hayesgreene.wordpress.com/ http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/famhist1.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/

    06/05/2010 03:12:33
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Genealogical Society of South Africa, Western Cape Branch
    2. Steve Hayes
    3. Monthly Meeting Genealogical Society of South Africa, Western Cape Branch Date - Saturday 8 May Time - 14:00 Place - Goodwood Library Hall, Church Street, Goodwood Entrance - Free Speaker - Dr Matilda Burden Matilda is senior lecturer in cultural history at the University of Stellenbosch. She is also involved with the university's museum and communities wishing to establish heritage centres. One of her special fields of interest is South African place names. Topic - South African Place Names (Presentation in Afrikaans) A pot-pourrie of interesting aspects around place names, such as the changes, multi-language, origin, pronunciation and richness. Contact person - Chairman Andrew Kok 082 500 6758. Thank you Mariana Olivier GSSA, Western Cape Branch 021 557-4355 082 438 9591 -- Steve Hayes Web: http://hayesgreene.wordpress.com/ http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/famhist1.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/

    05/04/2010 08:11:30
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Anita Talks Genealogy - Genealogy From An African American Perspective
    2. alani
    3. Tune in Friday nights to Anita Talks Genealogy on Blog Talk Radio. The show airs from 8:00-8:45 pm (pst), and is hosted by Author Anita Wills. For more information: http://blogtalkradio.com/Anita-Wills

    04/19/2010 05:58:53
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] database genealogy
    2. Genealogie Rijerkerk-Bronner
    3. http://www.rijerkerk.net/databank Genealogical database. Now in English. Choose the language in upper left and click Ga Genealogische Datenbank Jetzt auch in deutscher Sprache. Wählen Sie die Sprache in der linken oberen und klicken Sie auf Ga Base de données généalogiques Maintenant aussi en français. Choisissez la langue dans coin supérieur gauche et cliquez sur Ga Base de datos genealógico. Ahora en español. Elige el idioma en la parte superior izquierda y haga clic en Ga Genealogical database Nu også på dansk. Vælg sprog i øverste venstre og klik Ga Genealogiska databas. Nu på svenska. Välj språk i övre vänstra och klicka på Ga Secere veritabani Simdi Türkçe olarak. Seç sol üst ve tikirti dil GA

    04/15/2010 03:34:18
    1. Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka?
    2. Michael Emery
    3. Methinks that emotions have tainted this thread to the point of unintelligibility. The lesson I take away has nothing to do with Barack Obama, his name, or the Kenyan tradition of naming children. I have learned that some people continue to distrust each other and abuse the awesome power of communication. From hereon this thread ends, and Mr. Obama's name will be withheld to protect the innocent. -- Michael Emery co-founder co-moderator soc.genealogy.african

    03/07/2010 04:55:09
    1. Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka?
    2. Emil Pulsifer
    3. Perhaps I should clarify my original query. First, note that "Barak Obama, Sr." is the president's father, not the president; thus the issue can have no bearing on "birther" theories. Second, while it's certainly true that a variety of languages are spoken in nearly every country, and that parents are generally free to name their children whatever they wish, that doesn't explain why the non-Muslim parents of Barak Obama, Sr. should give their son an Arabic name (Barak) instead of a traditional Kenyan name (Baraka) with the same meaning. Those contriving an answer should carefully consider the forum. This is soc.genealogy.african, not alt.loonie.pop-off, or alt.third-rate- public-school.inferiority-complex, or alt.faulty-inference-engine. And I would ask the moderator to filter out unprovoked, unwarranted personal attacks such as those of Dana Turner. Regards, E. Pulsifer

    03/07/2010 04:27:37
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Tracing Your African American Ancestry
    2. alani
    3. Many Years ago I embarked on a journey to document my family history. It has been a long journey, and in some aspects quite rewarding. I wrote two books about my search, Pieces of the Quilt: The Mosaic of An African American Family, and Notes and Documents of Free Persons of Color. Along the way, I took a DNA test, one which showed about 87% European Ancestry, 8% Native, 5% African. That is my straight maternal line, and only one part of the many branches in my family. My brother took a Full Panel DNA test, which showed our straight paternal line to be Native American from Columbia South America. Seeing those results is what prompted me to write Pieces of the Quilt, which was my second book. I came to realize that African Americans are more of an Ethnic Group, than a race. Some of us are mixed white/African, Native/ African, Native/African/White, and any mixture of the other groups in America. While tracing my ancestry, I proved my Native lineage, and also proved lineage to an ancestor who fought in the Revolutionary War. One of my ancestors was born in Guinea, enslaved at the age of twelve, and sold in South Carolina. Another African Ancestor was a slave in Fredricksburg Virginia, to a Quaker. There are those who were Indentured Servants to George Washington's family in Westmoreland County Virginia. My interest in tracing our family history started early with stories my mother told me as a child. Her stories led me to Virginia and Pennsylvania, the places where much of our history took place. I am now assisting African Americans in tracing their ancestry, and especially those who are tracing Native lines. Not only have I found lines, but I have been able to complete a family history chart. i know how i felt when each ancestors was revealed, and it is good to share that experience with others. If anyone is seeking assistance in locating ancestors, please feel free to contact me.

    02/18/2010 02:38:32
    1. Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka?
    2. Karen King-Lavore
    3. Thanks Dana -- What a wonderful closing ! KAREN KING LAVORE LIVE LONG, LOVE & PROSPER ----- Original Message ----- From: Quan Pruitt<mailto:pruitt@msn.com> To: gen-african@rootsweb.com<mailto:gen-african@rootsweb.com> Sent: Tuesday, February 16, 2010 6:56 PM Subject: Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka? Dana, No one could of said it better!!!! ----- Original Message ----- From: Dana Turner<mailto:mzlibertee@earthlink.net<mailto:mzlibertee@earthlink.net>> To: gen-african@rootsweb.com<mailto:gen-african@rootsweb.com<mailto:gen-african@rootsweb.com%3Cmailto:gen-african@rootsweb.com>> Sent: Monday, February 15, 2010 4:41 PM Subject: Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka? Dear Emil, Yes, you are ba-rack-ing up the wrong tree! Your thinly disguised "birther" inquiry appears to be based on your incessant desire to demean, discredit or otherwise impugn the American citizenship of our duly-elected President of these United States. Unlike his predecessor President Barack Hussein Obama won the popular vote, not just the electoral vote like Mr. Bush Jr. did. Countless American citizens possess names of foreign or "foreign-sounding" derivations. Parents have the right to name their child any name they choose as long as it is not to advance some fraudulent purpose. There is no reason whatsoever that a Kenyan father and an American mother must be compelled to choose a name in a language of one parent or another. If that were the case we would not have ever had an 'Angelina Jolie' or 'Madonna Ciccone,' neither of whose parents were from Italy or Italian citizens at the time of their daughter's birth. Furthermore, there are many many languages spoken in Kenya such as Kikuyu, Luhya, Luo, Kamba, Kalejin, Kisii, Meru and dozens of other languages. (For your edification, there are more indigenous languges spoken on the continent of African than any other continent.) kiSwahili is not a "language" per se but a hodge-podge of words and syntax taken from Arabic and many other local languages. Swahili is merely the 'commercial language' of East-Central Africa. Kenyan citizens, have for centuries, spoken English and other non-African languages fluently (and better than Americans as they were taught English ... by the English who spoke the King's English ...not the bastardized guttural that passes for the American dialect) as well as Arabic, Hindi, Urdu, Italian, Russian and Mandarin which are all languages propagated across the country through business, religious and social intercourse. More than 10% of Kenyans practice Islam and so the use of an Arabic first name for a child would be no more unusual than it would be for a Catholic-American to name their child a Latin name such as Xavier or Augustus or Ignatius. Kenyan citizens have every right to name a child from any of the above or any other language. The idea that peoples of African descent are limited to using any single language exclusively and are not free to draw-upon, borrow-from or utilize names or words from any other language is xenocentrist. No one would ever challenge or question the choice of Caucasian parents to name their child whatever name they have chosen. From 'River' to 'Apple' inexplicable names and names of unexplicable origin are a mainstay of American life, and, a hallmark of the freedoms that everyone it seems - except African-Americans - are allowed to enjoy in this country without causing so much as the raising of an eyebrow. I suggest you spend your time belaboring weightier issues such as how to take back the American economy from the financial services oligarchy that has shipped our jobs across oceans and foreclosed upon the homes of honest, hardworking citizens after selling them mortgages procured with fraudulently-processed loans at exorbitant interest rates. Or, you might consider the consequences of the most recent president fighting a Congressionally-undeclared war based on deceptive and conjured-up intelligence that has cost the lives of 5,000 American troops and hundreds of thousands of innocent, non-beligerant Iraqis. But of course that is not of concern to those who refuse to accept the reality that a man of African descendant is the U.S. Commander-In-Chief. Please "get over it" and do something constructive to save this country from the trillions of dollars owed to China, Saudi Arabia and Japan. Shame on you and on your cohort that, as Jesus Christ said, is "willing to strain at a gnat while gulping down a camel." Yours In Christ, Dana DeAndra Turner, J.D. On Sun, Feb 14, 2010 at 4:59 PM, Emil Pulsifer <e_pulsifer@yahoo.com<mailto:e_pulsifer@yahoo.com<mailto:e_pulsifer@yahoo.com%3Cmailto:e_pulsifer@yahoo.com>>> wrote: > I'm a bit confused by President Obama's name. The original (appearing > on his U.S. birth certificate) is "Barack", after his father Barack, > Sr., but his father was a Kenyan, and I thought that the kiSwahili > name is Baraka, whereas Barack is an anglicized spelling of an Arabic > variation of "Mubarak". > > I suppose that this is as much a problem in biography as it is in > genealogy, but any insights would be appreciated. > > To me (an American) Baraka also sounds decidedly African, whereas > Barack might be almost anything. I don't know if that figured into > the spelling as it appears on the birth certificate, or if I'm barking > up the wrong tree. > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com%3Cmailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com>> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the > quotes in the subject and the body of the message > -- Dana D. Turner, J.D. dana.turner.esq@gmail.com<mailto:dana.turner.esq@gmail.com<mailto:dana.turner.esq@gmail.com%3Cmailto:dana.turner.esq@gmail.com>> Satyagraha "First they ignore you, then they attack you, then you win! - Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com%3Cmailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com>> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    02/17/2010 05:03:56
    1. Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka?
    2. Quan Pruitt
    3. Dana, No one could of said it better!!!! ----- Original Message ----- From: Dana Turner<mailto:mzlibertee@earthlink.net> To: gen-african@rootsweb.com<mailto:gen-african@rootsweb.com> Sent: Monday, February 15, 2010 4:41 PM Subject: Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka? Dear Emil, Yes, you are ba-rack-ing up the wrong tree! Your thinly disguised "birther" inquiry appears to be based on your incessant desire to demean, discredit or otherwise impugn the American citizenship of our duly-elected President of these United States. Unlike his predecessor President Barack Hussein Obama won the popular vote, not just the electoral vote like Mr. Bush Jr. did. Countless American citizens possess names of foreign or "foreign-sounding" derivations. Parents have the right to name their child any name they choose as long as it is not to advance some fraudulent purpose. There is no reason whatsoever that a Kenyan father and an American mother must be compelled to choose a name in a language of one parent or another. If that were the case we would not have ever had an 'Angelina Jolie' or 'Madonna Ciccone,' neither of whose parents were from Italy or Italian citizens at the time of their daughter's birth. Furthermore, there are many many languages spoken in Kenya such as Kikuyu, Luhya, Luo, Kamba, Kalejin, Kisii, Meru and dozens of other languages. (For your edification, there are more indigenous languges spoken on the continent of African than any other continent.) kiSwahili is not a "language" per se but a hodge-podge of words and syntax taken from Arabic and many other local languages. Swahili is merely the 'commercial language' of East-Central Africa. Kenyan citizens, have for centuries, spoken English and other non-African languages fluently (and better than Americans as they were taught English ... by the English who spoke the King's English ...not the bastardized guttural that passes for the American dialect) as well as Arabic, Hindi, Urdu, Italian, Russian and Mandarin which are all languages propagated across the country through business, religious and social intercourse. More than 10% of Kenyans practice Islam and so the use of an Arabic first name for a child would be no more unusual than it would be for a Catholic-American to name their child a Latin name such as Xavier or Augustus or Ignatius. Kenyan citizens have every right to name a child from any of the above or any other language. The idea that peoples of African descent are limited to using any single language exclusively and are not free to draw-upon, borrow-from or utilize names or words from any other language is xenocentrist. No one would ever challenge or question the choice of Caucasian parents to name their child whatever name they have chosen. From 'River' to 'Apple' inexplicable names and names of unexplicable origin are a mainstay of American life, and, a hallmark of the freedoms that everyone it seems - except African-Americans - are allowed to enjoy in this country without causing so much as the raising of an eyebrow. I suggest you spend your time belaboring weightier issues such as how to take back the American economy from the financial services oligarchy that has shipped our jobs across oceans and foreclosed upon the homes of honest, hardworking citizens after selling them mortgages procured with fraudulently-processed loans at exorbitant interest rates. Or, you might consider the consequences of the most recent president fighting a Congressionally-undeclared war based on deceptive and conjured-up intelligence that has cost the lives of 5,000 American troops and hundreds of thousands of innocent, non-beligerant Iraqis. But of course that is not of concern to those who refuse to accept the reality that a man of African descendant is the U.S. Commander-In-Chief. Please "get over it" and do something constructive to save this country from the trillions of dollars owed to China, Saudi Arabia and Japan. Shame on you and on your cohort that, as Jesus Christ said, is "willing to strain at a gnat while gulping down a camel." Yours In Christ, Dana DeAndra Turner, J.D. On Sun, Feb 14, 2010 at 4:59 PM, Emil Pulsifer <e_pulsifer@yahoo.com<mailto:e_pulsifer@yahoo.com>> wrote: > I'm a bit confused by President Obama's name. The original (appearing > on his U.S. birth certificate) is "Barack", after his father Barack, > Sr., but his father was a Kenyan, and I thought that the kiSwahili > name is Baraka, whereas Barack is an anglicized spelling of an Arabic > variation of "Mubarak". > > I suppose that this is as much a problem in biography as it is in > genealogy, but any insights would be appreciated. > > To me (an American) Baraka also sounds decidedly African, whereas > Barack might be almost anything. I don't know if that figured into > the spelling as it appears on the birth certificate, or if I'm barking > up the wrong tree. > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the > quotes in the subject and the body of the message > -- Dana D. Turner, J.D. dana.turner.esq@gmail.com<mailto:dana.turner.esq@gmail.com> Satyagraha "First they ignore you, then they attack you, then you win! - Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948) ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com<mailto:GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com> with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    02/16/2010 10:56:14
    1. Re: [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka?
    2. Dana Turner
    3. Dear Emil, Yes, you are ba-rack-ing up the wrong tree! Your thinly disguised "birther" inquiry appears to be based on your incessant desire to demean, discredit or otherwise impugn the American citizenship of our duly-elected President of these United States. Unlike his predecessor President Barack Hussein Obama won the popular vote, not just the electoral vote like Mr. Bush Jr. did. Countless American citizens possess names of foreign or "foreign-sounding" derivations. Parents have the right to name their child any name they choose as long as it is not to advance some fraudulent purpose. There is no reason whatsoever that a Kenyan father and an American mother must be compelled to choose a name in a language of one parent or another. If that were the case we would not have ever had an 'Angelina Jolie' or 'Madonna Ciccone,' neither of whose parents were from Italy or Italian citizens at the time of their daughter's birth. Furthermore, there are many many languages spoken in Kenya such as Kikuyu, Luhya, Luo, Kamba, Kalejin, Kisii, Meru and dozens of other languages. (For your edification, there are more indigenous languges spoken on the continent of African than any other continent.) kiSwahili is not a "language" per se but a hodge-podge of words and syntax taken from Arabic and many other local languages. Swahili is merely the 'commercial language' of East-Central Africa. Kenyan citizens, have for centuries, spoken English and other non-African languages fluently (and better than Americans as they were taught English ... by the English who spoke the King's English ...not the bastardized guttural that passes for the American dialect) as well as Arabic, Hindi, Urdu, Italian, Russian and Mandarin which are all languages propagated across the country through business, religious and social intercourse. More than 10% of Kenyans practice Islam and so the use of an Arabic first name for a child would be no more unusual than it would be for a Catholic-American to name their child a Latin name such as Xavier or Augustus or Ignatius. Kenyan citizens have every right to name a child from any of the above or any other language. The idea that peoples of African descent are limited to using any single language exclusively and are not free to draw-upon, borrow-from or utilize names or words from any other language is xenocentrist. No one would ever challenge or question the choice of Caucasian parents to name their child whatever name they have chosen. From 'River' to 'Apple' inexplicable names and names of unexplicable origin are a mainstay of American life, and, a hallmark of the freedoms that everyone it seems - except African-Americans - are allowed to enjoy in this country without causing so much as the raising of an eyebrow. I suggest you spend your time belaboring weightier issues such as how to take back the American economy from the financial services oligarchy that has shipped our jobs across oceans and foreclosed upon the homes of honest, hardworking citizens after selling them mortgages procured with fraudulently-processed loans at exorbitant interest rates. Or, you might consider the consequences of the most recent president fighting a Congressionally-undeclared war based on deceptive and conjured-up intelligence that has cost the lives of 5,000 American troops and hundreds of thousands of innocent, non-beligerant Iraqis. But of course that is not of concern to those who refuse to accept the reality that a man of African descendant is the U.S. Commander-In-Chief. Please "get over it" and do something constructive to save this country from the trillions of dollars owed to China, Saudi Arabia and Japan. Shame on you and on your cohort that, as Jesus Christ said, is "willing to strain at a gnat while gulping down a camel." Yours In Christ, Dana DeAndra Turner, J.D. On Sun, Feb 14, 2010 at 4:59 PM, Emil Pulsifer <e_pulsifer@yahoo.com> wrote: > I'm a bit confused by President Obama's name. The original (appearing > on his U.S. birth certificate) is "Barack", after his father Barack, > Sr., but his father was a Kenyan, and I thought that the kiSwahili > name is Baraka, whereas Barack is an anglicized spelling of an Arabic > variation of "Mubarak". > > I suppose that this is as much a problem in biography as it is in > genealogy, but any insights would be appreciated. > > To me (an American) Baraka also sounds decidedly African, whereas > Barack might be almost anything. I don't know if that figured into > the spelling as it appears on the birth certificate, or if I'm barking > up the wrong tree. > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > GEN-AFRICAN-request@rootsweb.com with the word 'unsubscribe' without the > quotes in the subject and the body of the message > -- Dana D. Turner, J.D. dana.turner.esq@gmail.com Satyagraha "First they ignore you, then they attack you, then you win! - Mahatma Gandhi (1869-1948)

    02/15/2010 10:41:13
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] Barack or Baraka?
    2. Emil Pulsifer
    3. I'm a bit confused by President Obama's name. The original (appearing on his U.S. birth certificate) is "Barack", after his father Barack, Sr., but his father was a Kenyan, and I thought that the kiSwahili name is Baraka, whereas Barack is an anglicized spelling of an Arabic variation of "Mubarak". I suppose that this is as much a problem in biography as it is in genealogy, but any insights would be appreciated. To me (an American) Baraka also sounds decidedly African, whereas Barack might be almost anything. I don't know if that figured into the spelling as it appears on the birth certificate, or if I'm barking up the wrong tree.

    02/14/2010 06:59:56
    1. [GEN-AFRICAN] South African genealogy: frequently-asked questions (FAQ)
    2. Steve Hayes
    3. If you are a newcomer to South African genealogy, you may have a lot of questions. Here are some answers to some of the most frequently asked questions: WHERE'S THE BEST PLACE TO BEGIN? If you're asking this on the Internet, presumably you have access to a web browser, and one of the best places to begin with South African genealogy is right here: http://home.global.co.za/~mercon/ WHERE CAN I FIND SOUTH AFRICAN CENSUS RECORDS? The short answer is: You can't. South African census returns are routinely destroyed after statistical information has been abstracted, so South African genealogists don't use them. WHAT DO SOUTH AFRICAN GENEALOGISTS USE THEN? One of the best places to begin is the records of deceased estates. These usually have a Death Notice, which should (but sometimes doesn't) give you the names of the parents, spouse and children of the deceased, or if the deceased was unmarried, the names of brothers and sisters. They have the wills, if any (except in the Cape, where wills and estate accounts have been filed separately from death notices in the older estates), and the estate accounts. The older ones are in the archives and have computer indexes, and you can search the indexes on the web here: http://www.national.archives.gov.za/naairs_content.htm but be sure to read the introduction and explanatory text before searching. WHERE CAN I FIND SOUTH AFRICAN SHIPPING LISTS? First, they are not a good place to start looking. They are incomplete, and all over the place. If you want to know if some relative went to South Africa and died here, look in the deceased estates, not the shipping lists. In most cases, shipping lists are a last resort, or a means of providing "filler" information to round out the family history. Secondly, if you do want to try shipping lists, you need to know where your ancestor came from, and roughly when. If the answer is Germany 1859, the shipping lists have been published (Werner Schmidt-Pretoria, _Deutsche Auswanderung nach Sued-Afrika im 19 Jahrhundert_). Some other shipping lists have also been published, but they are fragmentary. If you are looking for ancestors who emigrated to Southern Africa in the period 1890-1925, one possible source is _South Africa_ magazine. This was published in London. The Johannesburg Public Library and the National Library in Tshwane have incomplete runs. The US Library of Congress has a fairly complete collection. You could try other libraries too. They published lists of passengers embarking at British ports for South Africa, and embarking at South African ports for the UK (and sometimes other places). _South Africa_ magazine is a useful source, if you can find it, as it also has birth, marriage and death announcements, and other personal news, usually of the richer members of society. Some of these have been transcribed by Ellen Stanton, and can be seen here: http://www.genealogyworld.net/ellen/shipping/index.html Some other passenger lists and other useful stuff are available at: http://www.genealogyworld.net/ WHERE CAN I FIND WILLS OR PROBATE RECORDS? With the deceased estates. See: http://www.national.archives.gov.za/naairs_content.htm I did a search on the archives: what do the funny things like DEPOT and VOLUME mean? See the warning above: Be sure to read the introduction and explanatory text before searching. If you didn't, go here now: http://www.national.archives.gov.za/fields.htm HOW DO I GET A BIRTH CERTIFICATE? With some difficulty. First, to apply for one, you need to know the information you probably want to get from the certificate. That's Catch 22. Catches 1-21 are almost as bad. Birth cer- tificates are expensive. They take a long time to get. The indexes are not open to the public so you can't ask someone else to look them up. For more information, and applications forms, see: http://www.home-affairs.gov.za/ The good news is that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints (LDS, Mormons) has microfilmed some of the registers, so that if you want the information in the register, as opposed to an official certificate, you can try there. If you want to know what the LDS has, go to their web site: http:// www.familysearch.com or http://www.familysearch.org , Click on LIBRARY, click on FAMILY LIBRARY HISTORY CATALOGUE, click on PLACE NAME enter South Africa Click on Civil Registration Click on HERE right at the bottom so you have a printable copy. HOW DO I GET A MARRIAGE CERTIFICATE? Marriage certificates are of little use to genealogists in South Africa. They do not give the names and occupations of parents. They are as difficult to get as birth certificates. For more information on getting marriage certificates see: http://www.home-affairs.gov.za/ Your best chance of seeing a marriage certificate, however, is if the couple got divorced, and you find a copy in the divorce records. SOME divorce records are in the archives, and you can find them here: http://www.national.archives.gov.za/naairs_content.htm The archival references to divorces will sometimes speak of "illiquid cases" or "opposed applications", and sometimes there will be both. Make sure you order the right ones. They can be quite useful. Sometimes you can really get the dirt on your ancestors from these things - private detectives' reports on how many times they committed adultery, where and with whom, for example. Also, names and ages of minor children and who got the custody. If you still want a marriage certificate (or birth certificate), you need to apply to the Department of Home Affairs, Private Bag X114, Pretoria, 0001. Before they can issue a certificate, they usually want to know the kind of information you probably hope to get from the certificate. Marriages were registered nationally from 1923 to 1976, and after 1994. Between 1976 and 1994 some "homeland" marriages may have been registered separately. Before 1923 registrations were in the different provinces, and before 1910 in the different colonies. Before 1902 it was in the different republics and colonies. You still apply to the same place, but bear in mind that older registers are kept in the archives, and for a certificate to be written they have to be transferred from the archives to the Department of Home Affairs and then returned. This can take a long time. Also check the information above under "Birth Certificates" on how to find out if any of the marriage registers have been filemed by the LDS Church. Before about 1895 in many places marriages were only recorded in church registers. The situation is a lot more complex than described above, and the complexities are things you can ask about on the list, but the general description should give you some idea of the kind of questions that might be worth asking. WHERE CAN I FIND CHURCH RECORDS? With difficulty. There are well over 8000 separate religious denominations in South Africa, and many people change denominations 3 or more times during their lives. People move to a new town, and join a new denomination or religion, or become agnostics or atheists. The records of these denominations are all over the place too. Some of the older and larger denominations have centralised their records, but most have not. They are kept in local churches and can be damaged or destroyed by damp, acid paper or ink, insects, mice, fire or flood, or simply being tossed out in an over-zealous clean-up. Some of the smaller denominations keep very poor records. Forged marriage cer- tificates are common, especially in rural areas. If you know what denomination your ancestors were, and where they were living, when children were born or they were married, you can ask some specific questions on the SA Genealogy list like "Where are the Wesleyan Methodist Registers for Colesberg in the period 1860- 1880?" But general requests for look ups in church registers without mentioning a particular denomination, time and place are unlikely to get a useful response. WHERE CAN I FIND MILITARY RECORDS? Department of Defence DOCUMENTATION CENTRE Private Bag X289 Pretoria 0001 South Africa Tel 012-322-6350 ext 227 Fax 012-323-5613 The more info you can give the faster they can find details. They have card indexes for military personnel who served in WWI and WWII (a separate index for each war). These give the service number, which can be used to find fuller service records. WHERE CAN I LOOK UP THE PHONE NUMBERS OF LIVING RELATIVES? Turn your web browser to: http://phonebook.yellowpages.co.za/ it's the on-line phone book. WHAT IF MY FAMILY WERE IN OTHER PARTS OF AFRICA? Try asking on the African Genealogy mailing list -- see: http://groups.yahoo.com/group/afgen/ WHAT SHOULD I DO NEXT? Go to: http://home.global.co.za/~mercon/sagen.htm and follow the links! -- This FAQ file is maintained by: Steve Hayes Web: http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/stevesig.htm E-mail: hayesstw@gmail.com Last Updated: 5 December 2009 Suggestions for additions or improvements are welcome. -- Steve Hayes Web: http://hayesgreene.wordpress.com/ http://hayesfam.bravehost.com/famhist1.htm http://www.geocities.com/Athens/7783/

    12/05/2009 02:42:18