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    1. FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA TODAY SHOW
    2. ROBERT L FREESE
    3. >From: "Russ Freese" <[email protected]> >To: [email protected] >Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA TODAY >SHOW >Date: Sat, 04 Feb 2006 17:44:02 -0800 > > > > >>From: "Russel Freese" <[email protected]> >>To: <[email protected]> >>Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA TODAY >>SHOW >>Date: Thu, 2 Feb 2006 23:45:50 -0800 >> >> >>-----Original Message----- >>From: Robert Murray >>Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 8:28 AM >>To: Anisse J. Hardin; Barbara Potter; Brandon Frisch; Brian C. Olsen; >>Brock Rogers; Chad Duffey; Cheryl Madvin; Douglas Duffey; Garret D. >>Lashbrook; Jeff Chase; Jeff Lindholm; Jodie Peterson; John Crook; Joyce >>Gibson; Kathy Murray; Kellie Nelson; Kevin Strickland; Marcus Lindholm; >>Matt Lefler; Michael J. Wickert; Michael Kleinpaste; Michelle Davis; >>Patti Steiner; Rhonda Johnson; Robert Wurz; Ron Carlson; Russel Freese; >>Sam Davis; Sarah Speziale; Scott Drader; Scott Proost; Shaun Murray; >>Shelly Hogeweide (Email Forwarder); Shelly Rogers; Steve Kuennen; Terry >>Monahan; Trista Avante; [email protected]; [email protected]; >>[email protected]; [email protected]; [email protected]; >>[email protected]; [email protected]; >>[email protected]; Debbie Finn >>Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA >>TODAY SHOW >> >> >> >> >> >> >> >> _____ >> >>From: Billy Crumm [mailto:[email protected]] >>Sent: Wednesday, February 01, 2006 5:13 PM >>To: Robert Murray >>Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA >>TODAY SHOW >> >> >> >> >> >> >> _____ >> >> >>From: "brianna Miller" <[email protected]> >>To: [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected], >>[email protected], [email protected], [email protected] >>Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING AMERICA >>TODAY SHOW >>Date: Wed, 01 Feb 2006 09:12:22 -0800 >> > >> > >> > >> >>From: "Katie Reynolds" <[email protected]> >> >>To: <[email protected]>, "brianna Miller" >> >><[email protected]>, "Scott Reynolds" >> >><[email protected]>, "Drollinger, Bill" >> >><[email protected]>, "Katie Reynolds" >> >><[email protected]> >> >>Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING >> >>AMERICA TODAY SHOW >> >>Date: Tue, 31 Jan 2006 09:34:45 -0800 >> >> >> >>:-) >> >> >> >>-----Original Message----- >> >>From: Bill and Cleda [mailto:[email protected]] >> >>Sent: Monday, January 30, 2006 4:25 PM >> >>To: Tod&Beckie; Sheree Halleran; Sandy; [email protected]; >> >>[email protected]; rene j; Randy; pwcohn; Matt; mary ruth >> >>andsager; Marv Mazur; [email protected]; Lynn; Lowell Tiller; Lora >> >>Hershey; Kirk, Ray; Kevin Schoonover; Katie Reynolds; Katie >> >>Reynolds; >> >>Kathy Schoonover; [email protected]; Jim Coxen; Jean E Blair; >> >>Jake >> >>Parham; Heather Clarke; Glenn; [email protected]; >> >>[email protected]; >> >>Dick; BRIAN; Bill/Darlene Andsager; Betty >> >>Subject: Fw: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >>TODAY SHOW >> >> >> >> >> >>----- Original Message ----- >> >>From: "Bev" <[email protected]> >> >>To: "Sara Lindsay" <[email protected]>; "Mildred Kasari" >> >><[email protected]>; "Michelle Kane" <[email protected]>; "Mary Lou >> >>Bellus" >> >><[email protected]>; "Lyn Norton" <[email protected]>; "Lowell >> >>Tiller" >> >><[email protected]>; "Lindsay Selle" <[email protected]>; >> >>"kendra >> >>Selle" <[email protected]>; "Kelly Cardenas" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >>"Kathy Jewett" <[email protected]>; "Jason Quintero" >> >><[email protected]>; "James & Helen Johnson" >> >><pop.eotnet.net>; >> >>"Faye >> >>Zimmerman" <[email protected]>; "Dorla" <[email protected]>; >> >>"Deborah L. >> >>Kenny" <[email protected]>; "Dave Dorran" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >>"Claudia Stewart" <[email protected]>; "Bill & Cleda" >> >><[email protected]>; "Barbara Braswell" <[email protected]> >> >>Sent: Monday, January 30, 2006 10:56 AM >> >>Subject: Fw: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >>TODAY >> >>SHOW >> >> >> >> >> >> > This is about as stupid as sleeping on a bar of soap to relieve >> >>a >> >>backache. >> >> > However, that seems to work, dumb as it sounds. I was born in >> >>Missouri so >> >>I >> >> > will believe this little fiasco when I see it. >> >> > ----- Original Message ----- >> >> > From: "Faye Zimmerman" <[email protected]> >> >> > To: "Eric Zimmerman" <[email protected]>; "Bethany >> >>Zimmerman" >> >> > <[email protected]>; "Kay Adolfson" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >> > "Bev Harkenrider" <[email protected]>; "anne zimmerman" >> >> > <[email protected]>; "Bill & Peggy Zimmerman" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >> > "carol mcfadyen" <[email protected]>; "courtenay ross mcfadyen" >> >> > <[email protected]>; "Carol Grahnert" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >> > "Cheryl Borns" <[email protected]>; "EZ-Ed" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >> > "janell blackmer" <[email protected]> >> >> > Cc: "Kay Adolfson" <[email protected]>; "Mary Zimmerman" >> >> > <[email protected]>; "Michael & Mary Kay Elsner" >> >><[email protected]>; >> >> > <[email protected]>; "Ray Zimmerman" <[email protected]> >> >> > Sent: Sunday, January 29, 2006 7:51 PM >> >> > Subject: Fw: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >>TODAY >> >> > SHOW >> >> > >> >> > >> >> > > >> >> > > ----- Original Message ----- >> >> > > From: "Jonnie Manker" <[email protected]> >> >> > > To: "Fae Kettering" <[email protected]> >> >> > > Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 10:57 AM >> >> > > Subject: Fw: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >>TODAY >> >> > > SHOW >> >> > > >> >> > > >> >> > >> >> >> > >> ----- Original Message ----- >> >> > >> From: "Hoil French" <[email protected]> >> >> > >> To: "Harold mendelsohn" <[email protected]> >> >> > >> Cc: "Jonnie Ann Manker" <[email protected]> >> >> > >> Sent: Friday, January 27, 2006 6:39 AM >> >> > >> Subject: Fw: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >> > >> TODAY >> >> > >> SHOW >> >> > >> >> >> > >> >> >> > >> > >> >> > >> > ----- Original Message ----- >> >> > >> > From: "Dick Benton" <[email protected]> >> >> > >> > To: <[email protected]>; <[email protected]>; >> >> > >> <[email protected]>; >> >> > >> > <[email protected]>; "'Charlie Wall'" >> >> > > <[email protected]>; >> >> > >> > <[email protected]>; <[email protected]>; "'Richard >> >>Benton'" >> >> > >> > <[email protected]>; "'Megan Benton'" >> >><[email protected]> >> >> > >> > Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 8:57 PM >> >> > >> > Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD >> >>MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >> > > TODAY >> >> > >> > SHOW >> >> > >> > >> >> > >> > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > -----Original Message----- >> >> > >> > > From: Jeff Silletto >> >>[mailto:[email protected]] >> >> > >> > > Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 5:04 PM >> >> > >> > > To: 'Luke Firchau'; 'Gina Silletto'; >> >>[email protected] >> >> > >> > > Cc: 'Marc McGhee'; [email protected]; >> >>'SHEILA >> >> > >> > > SILLETTO' >> >> > >> > > Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD >> >>MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >> > >> > > TODAY SHOW >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Jeffrey A. Silletto >> >> > >> > > Ph# 720-344-6860 >> >> > >> > > Fax# 720-224-9675 >> >> > >> > > E-Fax# 303-346-7983 >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > -----Original Message----- >> >> > >> > > From: Lisa Hamburg [mailto:[email protected]] >> >> > >> > > Sent: Thursday, January 26, 2006 2:59 PM >> >> > >> > > To: Ambron; Aaron Witham; Amy Allen ; Ann Goldsmith Barr; >> >>Anne >> >> > >> > > Jensen; >> >> > >> > > Bill >> >> > >> > > and Terri Blatnik; Bob and Janet Fortnam; Brenda Deines; >> >>dave; >> >>Gary >> >> > >> > > Romero; >> >> > >> > > Geri Cleland; Glenn Hamburg (Comcast); home Laura and >> >>Stan >> >>Slifer; >> >> > > Jason >> >> > >> > > Hamburg; [email protected]; [email protected]; >> >>Karyn >> >>Atwood; >> >> > >> > > Kathryn >> >> > >> > > Zimmerman; Kevin Lausin; Kristen Rainey; Larry and Gail >> >>Monet; >> >> > >> > > [email protected]; Laurene J Monet; Laurie. >> >>[email protected] >> >> > > com; >> >> > >> > > [email protected]; Liz Karch; Marge Hart; Mark >> >>Brautigam; >> >>Marlene >> >> > >> > > & >> >> > >> > > David >> >> > >> > > Witham; [email protected]; Maureen Rodwin; Michelle and >> >>Vince >> >>Zappula; >> >> > >> > > [email protected]; Michael Hamburg; >> >>[email protected]; >> >> > >> > > [email protected]; PATRICIA MITCHELL; >> >>[email protected]; >> >>Brady, >> >> > >> > > Rebecca; >> >> > >> > > tasha maty; [email protected]; [email protected]; >> >> > >> > > [email protected]; >> >> > >> > > White, Tammy; Tasha Maty; Tina Bjornson; Tom and Suzanne >> >>Becker; >> >> > > Tricia >> >> > >> > > Thorndike-Suriel; Laurie Reichman; Wendy Farley; 'Wendy >> >>Wisbaum'; >> >> > >> > > Kathryn >> >> > >> > > Zimmerman; [email protected]; [email protected] com; Jason >> >>Hamburg >> >> > >> > > Subject: FW: PLEEEEEEEEASE REEEEEEAD! IT WAS ON GOOD >> >>MORNING >> >>AMERICA >> >> > >> > > TODAY >> >> > >> > > SHOW >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > All, >> >> > >> > > Don't know if this has any credence at all, but it only >> >>takes a >> >> > >> > > minute >> >> > >> > > to >> >> > >> > > read and forward. >> >> > >> > > I would feel awful if I left anyone out on the 'goodies' >> >>so I >> >> > > forwarded >> >> > >> > > this >> >> > >> > > to pretty much everyne on my forward list. >> >> > >> > > Xox >> >> > >> > > Lisa >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > THIS TOOK TWO PAGES OF THE TUESDAY USA TODAY - IT IS FOR >> >>REAL >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Kathy South Alcoa - EHS Maintenance Coordinator, >> >> > >> > > Phone: 765/771 - 3547 >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Pager : 765/420 - 6575 >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > To all of my friends, I do not usually forward >> >>messages, >> >>But >> >> > > this >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > is from my friend Pearlas Sandborn and she really >> >>is an >> >> > >> > > attorney. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > If she says that this will work - It will work. After >> >>all, What >> >>have >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > you got to lose? >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > SORRY EVERYBODY.. JUST HAD TO TAKE THE CHANCE!!! >> >>I'm an >> >> > > attorney, >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > And I know the law. This thing is for real. Rest >> >>assured >> >>AOL >> >> > >> > > and >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Intel will follow through with their promises for >> >>fear of >> >>facing >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > a multimillion-dollar class action suit similar to >> >>the >> >>one >> >> > >> > > filed >> >> > >> > > by >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > PepsiCo against General Electric not too long ago. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Dear Friends; Please do not take this for a junk >> >>letter. >> >>Bill >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Gates sharing his fortune. If you ignore this, You >> >>will >> >>repent >> >> > >> > > later. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Microsoft and AOL are now the largest Internet >> >>companies >> >>and >> >>in >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > an effort to make sure that Internet Explorer >> >>remains the >> >>most >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > widely used program, Microsoft and AOL are running an >> >>e-mail >> >>beta >> >> > >> > > test. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > When you forward this e-mail to friends, Microsoft >> >>can >> >>and wi >> >> > >> > > ll >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > track it (If you are a Microsoft Windows user) For >> >>a two >> >>weeks >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > time period. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > For every person that you forward this e-mail to, >> >>Microsoft >> >>will >> >>pay >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > you $245.00 For every person that you sent it to that >> >>forwards >> >>it >> >> > >> > > on, >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Microsoft will pay you $243.00 and for every third person >> >>that >> >> > > receives >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > it, You will be paid $241.00. Within two weeks, Microsoft >> >>will >> >> > >> > > contact >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > you via email for your mailing address and then send you >> >>a >> >>check. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Regards. >> >> > >> > > Charles S Bailey General Manager Field Operations >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > 1-800-842-2332 Ext. 1085 or 904-1085 or RNX >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > 292-1085 [email protected] >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > [email protected] >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > I thought this was a scam myself, But two weeks after >> >>receiving >> >>this >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > e-mail and forwarding it on. Microsoft contacted me for >> >>my >> >>address >> >> > > and >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > within days, I received a check for $24,800.00. You need >> >>to >> >>respond >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > before the beta testing is over. If anyone can afford >> >>this, >> >>Bill >> >> > > gates >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > is the man. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > It's all marketing expense to him. Please forward this to >> >>as >> >>many >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > people as possible. You are bound to get at least >> >>$10,000.00 >> >>We're >> >> > > not >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > going to help them out with their e-mail beta test >> >>without >> >>getting >> >>a >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > little something for our time. My brother's girlfriend >> >>got in >> >>on >> >> > >> > > this >> >> > > a >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > few months ago. When I went to visit him for the >> >>Baylor/UT >> >>game. >> >>She >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > showed me her check. It was for the sum of $4,324.44 and >> >>was >> >>stamped >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > "Paid in full" >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > Like i said before, I know the law, and this is for real. >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > > >> >>********************************************************************** >>** >> >> > >> > > **** >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > > >> >> > >> > >> >> > >> >> >> > >> >> >> > > >> >> > > >> >> > >> >> > >> >> >> >> >> > >> >_________________________________________________________________ >> >Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's >> >FREE! >> >http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/ >> > >> > >_________________________________________________________________ >FREE pop-up blocking with the new MSN Toolbar – get it now! >http://toolbar.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200415ave/direct/01/ > _________________________________________________________________ Express yourself instantly with MSN Messenger! Download today - it's FREE! http://messenger.msn.click-url.com/go/onm00200471ave/direct/01/

    02/07/2006 03:46:02
    1. Unknown Aten obit
    2. Pat Thomas
    3. Warren county, Illinois From the Monmouth Review, 17 April 1918 The vicinity of Roseville late yesterday afternoon was the scene of another tragedy when Glenn Aten, seventeen years old son of Ray Aten of Swan Creek, was crushed to death by a tractor. The young man and his father were driving a tractor attached to a road grader and were at work on the road south of Roseville, the tragedy occurring about one hundred yards south of the Pratt Corner. While the engine was in motion Glenn jumped to the ground and went to the front of the tractor to adjust the ventilator over the flues. It is supposed that he lost his footing and fell directly in the path of one of the big wheels, which passed over his head, literally crushing it flat. The father was unaware of what had happened until the men on the grader behind the tractor shouted to him. They in turn were not aware that the lad had fallen to the ground as they were busily occupied in handling the grader. The body of the young man was brought to the Marson undertaking parlors at Roseville. Dr. Ralph Graham, county coroner, was notified. A verdict from the jury at the inquest found the death was accidental. Pat Thomas 1335 Lakeview Avenue Winona, MN 55987 1-507-458-8227 mailto:[email protected] or if bouncing to [email protected] Knox County, Illinois USGENWEB Assistant CC http://www.rootsweb.com/~ilknox/knindex.htm

    11/21/2004 04:38:54
    1. [ATEN] CHAT: re: SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi all, This message is going to all my surname lists. If you receive it more than once, please use your delete button. I've decided that when I bring the Sunday Morning Coffee back that I won't bring it to the lists anymore. It isn't that I don't think you're worth it, ...I DO think you're worth it or I won't consider writing them any more. :) If you'd like to receive the Coffee again, starting sometime in September, you'll need to sign up with the list I created two years ago specifically for that purpose. For those of you who've never received a Coffee: The Coffee is a free newsletter (of sorts, I guess) that encompasses social history, how-to's or just general topics geared toward genealogy, history, and/or geography. There may even be a short story, again geared toward our love of family history. No specific surname or region is discussed. It's not a "reply to" list, and normally only one message per week will come to you, that being the newsletter on Sunday morning. If you wish to receive the Coffee just send an email to <[email protected]>. A message will be sent to your email address for the purpose of verifying your email addy. Also, Topica will ask you to join Topica, but you don't really have to. Questions? Please contact me offlist at <[email protected]>. Colleen

    08/04/2003 08:59:28
    1. [ATEN] 1800's Aten family original photos-Peter and Mary Aten
    2. Lisa Ryans
    3. Mid 1800's photo! Original vintage photos! Backs Read: Uncle Peter Aten, mounted next to photo of Mary Aten. Martin Bailor's wife was an Aten. Mary Aten, mounted next to photo of Uncle Peter Aten. Both seemed to have been made at the same time by the same photographer T.M. McMahan, Danville, Pa. The photographer could have also been a traveling photographer, or the people possibly lived in or near Danville, Montour County, Pa. What a collection to add to your family history....genealogy! This possibly from what I see on the internet could be the Peter Aten/Auten b. approx. 1793 that married Mary Monfort. The url is: http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=2938567530 Hope they find a good home, Lisa

    07/03/2003 01:01:24
    1. [ATEN] CHAT: THIS IS AN IMPORTANT VIRUS HEADS-UP. EVERYONE PLEASE READ.
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi all, This message is going out to all the lists I manage. If you receive this multiple times, please keep one and read it. Use your delete key on the rest... EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY... GIVE ME ADVANCE NOTICE and RECEIVE MY RESPONSE TO IT ***BEFORE*** you send me any material by way of attachment. Any data arriving before a notice will be deleted. [email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected][email protected] NEWBIES AND COMPUTER NOVICES, PLEASE BE SURE TO READ **ALL** OF THIS MESSAGE... print this out if you have to, but understand that you need this information so you can protect your own computer, hence protect the rest of us... A new and dangerous version of the Tanatos Virus has hit cyberspace that all the major anti-virus houses have elevated to "red" on their scales and consider it "extremely dangerous." We are talking about one virus with TWO versions. ** Panda Anti-Virus Software has determined that this virus has already affected 23% of the computers globally. ** In just a few hours, this virus has already infected more computers than the Klez.I virus ~ the #1 virus since April 2002. I personally have already received 32 messages containing attachments with this virus. It is IMPERATIVE that you know about this one! The first thing I want to let you know is that YOU CAN NOT be infected by any messages coming from any of Rootsweb's lists. The threat to your computer DOES NOT come from the list itself. It comes OFF THE LIST from those friends, family members, acquaintances who have your email address in their computer's address books. They MAY OR may not belong to the same Rootsweb list(s) as you. That being said the following is important to remember when you read the information after the seven points I'll list below... 1. Rootsweb allows ONLY text messages through their filters. Attachments to messages are NOT allowed, nor can they get through those filters. 2. If you receive a message with an attachment that LOOKS like it came from the list, it's probably a virus-laden message (reread #1, above). DO NOT click on the attachment. Instead, either delete the message or email back to the person you received the message from and see if they sent you something by way of email. Just DON'T click on the attachment, particularly if it has a double extension (see #5). 3. Next, if you don't already have one, get yourself an anti-virus program IMMEDIATELY. A good, free one that I know of is AVG by Grisoft <http://www.grisoft.com>. Once you have it in your computer, be sure to update FREQUENTLY. 4. If you already have an AV program installed, update IMMEDIATELY. Norton AV has issued two AV updates in as many days. AVG has also issued updates and so has McAfee. 5. ANY file with a double extension (filename.pif.exe OR filename.gif.scr) is an excellent clue that you're sitting on an attachment with a virus in it. DO NOT OPEN IT!! Delete it immediately. 6. If your email program automatically opens attachments, go to your program options and find out how to stop that. You want to have to manually open them, especially now. 7. Quitting the Rootsweb lists you belong to isn't going to make your computer safe, nor will this virus "go away" tomorrow or even next week. Remember, it's whoever has you in their address books that you need to be concerned about. It IS wise at this point though, to be wary of any email list (for example, those at yahoogroups) that does allow attachments. Let's get started learning about this new virus... The new version of this malicious program, called Tanatos.b, has dangerously destructive capabilities for infecting computer files. Tanatos.a, also known as BugBear.a is a worm virus spreading via the Internet as an attachment to infected emails. The worm also copies itself over local networks to segments open for full access and runs backdoor and PSW trojan routines. Tanatos is a complex worm that contains many different elements: 1. Mass-mailer 2. Network Share Propagator 3. Keylogger 4. Remote Access Trojan 5. Polymorphic Parasitic File Infector 6. Security Software Terminator The Tanatos (BugBear) worm itself is a Windows PE EXE file about 50KB in length (it is compressed by the UPX utility), and written in Microsoft Visual C++. Aliases for the Tanatos virus are: Bugbear.B (F-Secure), PE_BUGBEAR.B (Trend), [email protected] (Symantec), W32.Kijmo, W32.Shamur, W32/Bugbear.b.dam, Win32.Bugbear.B (CA) ***HOT*** THE INFECTED MESSAGES HAVE DIFFERENT SUBJECTS, BODIES, AND ATTACHED FILE NAMES... The worm sends messages of two types (which it randomly selects). In first case, in order to run from the infected message the worm exploits the IFrame security breach (as a result the worm activates when a message is being opened or previewed in vulnerable (victim) systems). In the second case the worm does not use "breach tricks" and the attached worm copy activates from infected email only in case a user clicks on the attached file. The Tanatos worm got its name from the text string appearing in its code: Project Tanatos Installing While installing the worm copies itself to the Windows system directory under a random name and registers itself in the system registry auto-run key: HKLM\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\RunOnce The worm's EXE filename depends on the C: volume name, for example: FYOM.EXE YOK.EXE The worm also places a DLL file in the Windows system directory under a random name and uses this file to 'spy' on and record all keyboard input. The virus contains a long list of domain names (related to banking institutions). Strings within the virus suggest that if it determines the victim machine to belong to such a domain, the following Registry key is set: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\InternetSettings "EmableAutodial" = 00 00 00 01 For a list of the domains carried in the worm, go to the bottom of the page here: <http://vil.mcafee.com/dispVirus.asp?virus_k=100358> Mass-mailing ~ ***IMPORTANT!!!*** This worm emails itself to addresses found on the local system (in files and email messages). This goes for both the TO and FROM fields. Thus the SENDER ADDRESS IS SPOOFED, OR FORGED, AND NOT A DIRECT INDICATION OF AN INFECTED USER. It extracts addresses from file names containing these strings: * .DBX * .EML * INBOX * .MBX * .MMF * .NCH * .ODS * .TBB Spreading: Emails To send infected messages Tanatos uses a direct connection to the default email server. Victim email addresses are gotten from the following file types: *.ODS, *.MMF, *.NCH, *.MBX, *.EML, *.TBB, *.DBX, *INBOX* This virus spreads over the network (via network shares) and by mailing itself (using it's own SMTP engine). The Tanatos worm searches for these files in the system and extracts email-like strings from them. The Subject field is selected from the following variants: Greets! Get 8 FREE issues - no risk! Hi! Your News Alert $150 FREE Bonus! Re: Your Gift New bonus in your cash account Tools For Your Online Business Daily Email Reminder News free shipping! its easy Warning! SCAM alert!!! Sponsors needed new reading CALL FOR INFORMATION! 25 merchants and rising Cows My eBay ads empty account Market Update Report click on this! fantastic wow! bad news Lost & Found New Contests Today Only Get a FREE gift! Membership Confirmation Report Please Help... Stats I need help about script!!! Interesting... Introduction various Announcement history screen Correction of errors Just a reminder Payment notices hmm.. update Hello! Additionally, the message Subject can be randomly selected by "Tanatos" from a randomly selected disk file. Filenames may also be taken from files found in the infected computer's personal folder. The message Body is randomly selected by Tanatos varies and may contain fragments of files found on the victim's system (including old email messsages). The attached file name is also randomly selected and it may have a double extension, for example: filename.XLS.SCR Spreading: Network Tanatos enumerates network resources shared for writing, looks for the startup folder and copies its file to this folder (if found). This routine has a bug and the worm also sends copies of itself to shared network printers. Backdoor - HOW TANATOS WORKS... Tanatos is a remote access trojan, which means if your computer is infected, the worm open a port on your computer where it then listens for "master" commands (from the person or people who are controlling it). The backdoor routine grants control over infected machines, giving those who control Tanatos the ability to send/receive/copy/execute files, terminate processes, send out user info. etc. Tanatos also opens the HTTP server on infected machines, doing this offers a WEB interface with which to manipulate infected machines. PSW Trojan The worm also has a trojan routine that sends user info and cached passwords to several email addresses that are encrypted in the worm body. Other Among many others, Tanatos looks for the following applications and tries to terminate them: zonealarm.exe blackd.exe lockdown2000.exe avwin95.exe avgctrl.exe anti-trojan.exe safeweb.exe navwnt.exe navlu32.exe navapw32.exe Recognize that these files are execution files to anti-virus software programs. A full list of the applications Tanatos tries to attack can be found at <http://www.viruslist.com/eng/viruslist.html?id=52245>. Yes, there is a way to remove the virus from your computer if you find that it's been infected. Depending on the AV program you use, you'll need to visit their web site to get the repair. Scan your computer OFTEN. Update to the MAX. Be alert and be cautious. I've emphasized heavily about Rootsweb in this "head's up" because so many messages come to us offlist that do, in fact, have viruses attached. I get them every day. They appear to come FROM the list, when they actually DON'T. So, don't worry about receiving list mail. It's those messages offlist you need to be concerned about ~ which leads me to reiterate... The Tanatos (Bugbear) virus sends 3rd party emails where the FROM: address is spoofed. Third party viruses have 2 victims, the receiving and the spoofed sender. Rarely does a person today receive a virus directly from the purported sender. The Tanatos virus spoofs email addresses. So, if you receive an infected message from your mom (for example), realize that it WILL NOT have come from her computer but from someone (could even be someone she barely knows) who has her email address it it. BE VIGILANT with regard to the attachment itself. This information isn't meant to scare half the computer life out of you. However, it IS meant to make you aware of this malicious virus that can cost you money to get your computer repaired, cause you to lose your files, AND make a lot of people cranky! It's vital that you protect your computer so you can protect OUR computers. Colleen Pustola List Manager Permission is given to pass this message along.

    06/08/2003 04:17:48
    1. [ATEN] COLLEEN'S JUNE CHALLENGE...
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi family, Okay, you've had several months off while I've been socializing with my inlife relatives and getting my daughter married. Let's see if you're ready for THIS challenge... The warmer months are also the months people make moves. I know our immigrant ancestors didn't move only during the warmer months, though I'm sure they'd wished they had or could have. 1. This challenge is for you to tell us about your immigrant ancestors. Keep in mind who this discussion group is all about! We don't want ALL your immigrants, just the ones that apply to us. 2. IF you're unable to discuss your immigrant because you haven't found him/her yet (neither have I), then tell us about the major moves that your ancestors made in country - those who took to the trail. How's that? :) Colleen

    06/01/2003 05:15:31
    1. [ATEN] Subscribe
    2. Brian William Hall
    3. Blank

    04/02/2003 12:39:36
    1. [ATEN] COLLEEN'S FEBRUARY CHALLENGE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi all, Quiet... yep, that's what I've been the past month. I'm afraid it will all probably continue too, until after May. I'm so busy and socked up that I barely have any computer time right now. HOWEVER, we MUST your month unfulfilled with a genealogical challenge! :) Let's see, it's February, the month of love, so I offer you the following challenge... Tell us about a couple with our surname (variants are always okay) whose marriage lasted 50 years or more ~ a biography on their lives. Be as informative as you're able (parents, places of birth, death, & marriage; their children, etc), however, please do NOT tell us about anyone living ~ only those who have passed on, please. I'll now retreat to my quiet corner and once again become a ghost in the shadows. Happy Valentine's Day, everyone! :) Colleen

    02/02/2003 08:23:44
    1. [ATEN] COLLEEN'S JANUARY CHALLENGE... HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi everyone, I know... I know... you've waited since last year for this new challenge. Well, here it is... The beginning of a new year ~ the chance of a new beginning for our research. Has that new cousin joined us yet? Taking no chances, your challenge this month is your brick walls. Nope... it isn't a roll call. Please don't send in a Joe Doe and Mary Whoever marriage, thinking that's all we need to identify the couple. Tell us what you know; tell us what you've done. Our senior researchers just might have a hint or two that can help you. This is a brick wall conference! In the meantime, I'm going to start thinking about the Sunday Coffee, one which will be primarily directed to the newbies. Colleen

    01/03/2003 02:22:05
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. A Family Christmas, Part IV 3. On This Day In... (December 25th) 4. A Christmas Recipe 5. Christmas Memories NOTE: THERE WILL BE NO SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE NEXT WEEK. TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. A FAMILY CHRISTMAS, PART IV She'd spent a good part of the week trying to figure out how identical copies of her first two snowglobes could be inside this third one. Her grandmother was certainly no help, nor was her mother. She finally concluded it must have just been a coincidence and spent the rest of the week enjoying the family in this current globe. As in the previous weeks, she gravitated toward the copper-headed child. She felt a closeness to that little girl ~ closer than anyone in the earlier globes. It was uncanny how she preferred those people with the red hair. Once again, she presumed it was because of her own hair-color. Is it possible to really like someone you don't know? She didn't feel as though this family from Denver, 1921 was one of complete strangers, though. After a few days, she felt as if she knew *everything* about her latest friend. Of course, that wasn't so. How could she know more about the girl in the globe than what she'd learned this past week? Yet, she still sensed she knew this little girl very well. She was permitted to open the fourth gift now. She already knew it would be another snowglobe, and set the third one on her nightstand with the first two. Doll collection additions would probably have to come from her parents ~ they sure weren't coming from Grandma! This week's gift was wrapped in blue foil, tied and bowed with a 1"-wide gold ribbon. It was by far one of the more expensive wraps. She opened the box and carefully removed the globe. This time the plate on the front said, "Denver, 1943." She nearly dropped the snowglobe when she looked at the family inside. She saw her grandmother, grandfather, aunts, uncles, and HER MOTHER as a child! She called her grandmother on the phone, seeking some explanation. All Grandma would say was, "Those globes I gave you are very special. I wanted to give you something to remember me by." Remember her? With THIS globe, how could she forget her? She ran to her mother and showed her what she'd received. Mother had the answers, but wouldn't give them up. "You'll have to talk to Grandma. She can tell you everything. I will tell you, though, the globes are special and Grandma wants you to have something to remember her by. Take good care of them." Without a doubt, THIS globe was THE most special ~ the most precious to her. Inside were family she'd know all her young life. The scene wasn't near important as the people she was looking at. Tears ran down her cheek as the now middle-aged woman watched family in the scene that had passed on, leaving her alone. When she was the 8-year old recipient of the globe, little did she know the ultimate treasure the snowglobes would become to her. The love for her grandmother equalled that of the love for her parents. Her grandmother had indeed given her something to be remembered by... She was SO excited that pre-Christmas day! The 8-year old was totally enrapt with this new snowglobe. She noticed her grandmother's copper-colored hair, and her mother's brown hair with a tinge of red in it. Was Grandma the girl in last week's globe? She set the fourth globe on the coffee table and ran to her room for the third one. She looked more carefully at the copper-headed girl in the third globe, then back and forth from the fourth one. HER GRANDMOTHER!! It's her grandmother as a little girl! Now she was totally confused! But, she wouldn't leave the globes. Without realizing it, the stirrings of knowing her earlier family was becoming important to her. December 25, 1965 She waited eagerly for her grandparents to arrive that Christmas afternoon. She knew what was in the fifth gift and wanted to open it, but her mother had made her wait until her grandmother was sitting with her. THIS was something different. Why wasn't she permitted to open it this morning with her other gifts? Why was she having to wait? The 1-1/2 hours dragged on and she'd begun to wonder if Grandma was coming? Grandpa was fun to play with, but today it was Grandma she awaited. The door bell! Finally! She'd had to wait yet ANOTHER 15 minutes until Grandma and Grandpa said hello to everyone, collected hugs and kisses, got something to drink, talked to Mother and Father for a few minutes... Come on, already! Everyone was seated in the living room with the tree and the time had come... time for her to open the fifth snowglobe. The wrapping was white foil with a white satin ribbon and bow. For some reason, she was a little nervous opening this one. She was eager to see the contents of the gift alright, but she knew she this one was the most important. It was empty. Not the box... the snowglobe. The globe was totally empty. No scene, no people, just emptiness. Oh, there was snow in it alright, and water too. Other than that though, nothing. She was puzzled and confused. She looked to her grandmother for the answer... "Child, I have given you the opportunity to look back on generations of our family along with a second opportunity to reflect on how many people had to live in order for you to live and receive these globes. Each one of the families in the globes are a part of our family's history. I have handed you your ancestry, my dear. Treasure it always, for those who lived before you, and even I... have provided you the stepping stones to who you are. There is no finer gift I could give you than that of your heritage." Her grandmother continued, "The snowglobe you've received today is blank and empty because you are still a child. This is the globe YOU will fill when you've married and established your own family. Your mother has a snowglobe for her family ~ with you, your mother and father, and brothers. One day, she will give you her globe, too. Then, when you're ready, you will pass all the Christmas globes along to one of your grandchildren, that they might learn about their heritage, too. This will keep the family history alive." Today, in her middle-age, she sets six globes around her holiday-filled room and reflects back on that Christmas when she was 8-year old... the year she matured a little and realized the significance and importance of family. Today, the plate on the fifth globe says, "Seattle, 1987." In the room, if one looks closely, can be seen 5 snowglobes all lined up on the fireplace mantle. The scene is one of her, her husband, and their three children ~ one of whom happens to have... copper-colored hair. ~*~ FINIS ~*~ ON THIS DAY IN... DECEMBER 25th It amazes me that so many people think of Christmas only as the celebration of Jesus' birthday, or the day to open gifts after Santa's arrival last night. It just isn't so! :) So many events occurred on December 25th that our holiday activities overshadow some important ones. I list here just some of them: 0001 First Christmas, according to calendar-maker Dionysus Exiguus 0337 Earliest possible date Christmas was celebrated on December 25th 0352 First definite date Christmas was celebrated on December 25th 0498 French king Clovis baptises himself 0597 England adopts Julian calendar 0604 Battle at Etampes (Stampae): Burgundy beat Neustriers 0800 Pope Leo III crowns Charles the Great (Charlemagne), Roman emperor 0875 Charles, the Bare, crowned emperor of Rome 0967 John XIII crowned Otto II the Red German compassionate emperor 0969 Johannes I Tzimisces, crowned emperor of Byzantium 1066 William the Conqueror, crowned king of England 1100 Boudouin I of Boulogne crowned king of Jerusalem 1223 St Francis of Assisi assembles first Nativity scene (Greccio, Italy) 1492 Columbus' ship Santa Maria docks at Dominican Republic 1582 Zealand/Brabant adopts Gregorian calendar, yesterday was December 14th 1621 Governor William Bradford of Plymouth forbids game playing on Christmas day 1651 Massachusetts General Court ordered a five-shillings fine for "observing any such day as Christmas" 1741 Astronomer Anders Celcius introduces Centigrade temperature scale 1745 Prussia/Austria signs Treaty of Dresden; gives much of Silesia to the Prussians 1758 Halley's comet first sighted by Johann Georg Palitzsch 1776 Washington crosses Delaware and surprises and defeats 1,400 Hessians 1818 "Silent Night" by Franz Joseph Gruber & Joseph Mohr performed for the first time, at the Church of St. Nikolaus in Oberndorff, Austria. 1831 Louisiana & Arkansas are 1st states to observe Christmas as holiday 1868 Despite bitter opposition, President Andrew Johnson grants unconditional pardon to all persons involved in the Southern rebellion (the Civil War) 1896 "Stars & Stripes Forever" written by John Philip Sousa 1901 Battle at Tweefontein Orange-Free state: Boers surprise attack British 1914 Legendary/unofficial "Christmas Truce" takes place during World War I: British and German troops observed an unofficial truce and even played football together on the Western Front. 1922 Lenin dictates his "Political testament" 1926 Hirohito becomes emperor of Japan (1926-1989) 1937 Arturo Toscanini conducts 1st Symphony of the Air over NBC Radio 1939 Montgomery Ward introduces Rudolph the 9th reindeer 1939 "A Christmas Carol," by Charles Dickens, was read on CBS radio for the first time. 1941 Japan announces surrender of British-Canadian garrison at Hong Kong 1941 Japanese aircraft carriers Akagi/Kagu back in Kure, Japan 1942 Russian artillery/tank battle on German armies at Stalingrad 1972 The Nicaraguan capital Managua was hit by an earthquake. Over 10,000 people were killed. 1979 The USSR invaded Afghanistan in a bid to halt civil war and protect USSR interests. 1983 First live telecast of Christmas Parade 1991 Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev went on television to announce his resignation as leader of a Communist superpower that had already gone out of existence. CHRISTMAS RECIPE Christmas Wassail 4 cups apple cider 4 Cinnamon sticks 1 lemon sliced 1 tsp. whole allspice 1 tsp. whole cloves 4 cups pineapple/orange juice 1/2 cup sugar 4 cups dry red wine Place apple cider, cinnamon sticks, lemon slices, allspice and cloves in a large saucepan and heat over medium high heat for 20 minutes. Add pineapple/orange juice, sugar and red wine and heat thoroughly. Remove lemon slices, cinnamon sticks, cloves and allspice before serving. Serve warm. CHRISTMAS MEMORIES From Arden & Pat: "It wasn't that many years ago, but by far I enjoyed it most and when I close my eyes I can still see it so clearly. "We were volunteer campground hosts in Zion National Park in Utah. You ask why would anyone want to be there in the winter, well, it is heaven on earth. The weather is almost the same as nearby Las Vegas, it is mild and yet you know winter is not far away. After an incredible fall of golden aspen leaves falling like gold coins, we awoke Christmas morning to freshly fallen snow all around us. Just a dusting, not enough to cause alarm, digging, but enough to make the air fresh and quiet the earth. As I looked out the windows there were the mule deer munching on bird seed, as we were on a flyway for many varieties of birds. In the trees the chickadees were scolding the deer for keeping them from their breakfast. The black feral cat was in the nearby brush just hoping one of the birds might land nearby for his breakfast. It was incredible, as I stepped out the door, I looked straight up to see the darkest blue sky, large fluffy white clouds and the nearby walls of the canyon. There were only a few campers in the campground, I made my rounds quickly to return to steaming hot coffee, hot breakfast and the smell of the turkey cooking. What a day! By noon the snow was gone, but the sounds, smells and cheer were everywhere I looked. We enjoyed a blessed Christmas meal with our park staff where we all became family for a day, we all shared our best memories, and for the life of me I cannot remember what that memory was, because since that time this has been my favorite Christmas." From Beulah: "This isn't so much as one Christmas story but more of what has become a tradition. "It seems my first Christmas, I was 8 months old, my mother and father put up a tree and all the trimmings but they forgot a skirt for under the tree. My mother had on a black apron that she took off and spread under the tree. It was one that cover the back and front of her skirt. Without thinking it was packed up with the Christmas ornaments and the next year the same black apron was spread under the tree and a little snow sprinkled on it, from that time and through this Christmas that black apron has been under our tree. This year will be 79 years. It doesn't seem like Christmas unless the black apron is under the tree." From Alyce: "Here is one I think you will enjoy about a serviceman of mine! "It was Thanksgiving day, in 1989 when on our way home from having a lovely Thanksgiving Day dinner with relatives, I heard it announced on the evening news that our President Bush had order a carrier group bopund for Australia to leave their supposed route to their destination and go directly to the Gulf of Oman (I think that is correct) In any case it was just off of Somalia. One can imagine my nightmare being the mother of a serviceman on one of the boats in the group. However, I decided right then and there to get him and his group of marines on that LST a Christmas tree. I packaged them up an 8-10 inch tree complete with tiny lights, balls, and other ornaments which could be placed all over the meal lockers as well as gifts of special items marines like including homemade cookies etc. "As luck would have it these men actually spent Christmas day in the hinterlands of Somalia feeding the hungry, as I received a Christmas letter written by my son on the back of a MRE package (that is a "Meals Ready to Eat" package for the uninitiated!!!) When they returned to their ship a few days later, they were treated to the Christmas tree, the presents and cookies and a warm welcome by the President himself! It was a time my son will never forget!" Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. Merry Christmas, everyone! Be safe! ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    12/21/2002 09:40:51
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. A Family Christmas, Part III 3. Did You Know...? 4. A Christmas Recipe 5. Christmas Memories TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. A FAMILY CHRISTMAS, PART III She thoroughly enjoyed the Victorian family's Christmas. That group of people profoundly affected her, though she couldn't have told anyone why. There was just something about them that drew her ~ much like those in the early American snowglobe. As with the first one, she was drawn to the single redhead among the family group. She set the Victorian globe on the nightstand, next to the first one. It was the third week since her grandmother had handed her the gifts. The time had arrived to open the third one. She picked up a box wrapped in sparkly blue, metallicky paper tied with a thick, red ribbon. The first two were prettier, but this one was nice enough. She gave no thought about what was inside. The first two gifts were in the same shaped box as the one she now held. It would be another snowlobe. *sigh* Grandma just really needed help in selecting gifts! She was surely lacking in creativity and originality! Just how many snowglobes did one person need? As before, she was extremely careful opening the present. If this one was like the first two, there would be people inside... And sure enough, there were. She looked at the metal plate on the front of the snowglobe's stand. "Denver, 1921." These globes were coming from all over the United States, it appeared. In a parlor considered modern for the day, sat a family opening gifts. A tree, looking to be about 7 feet tall sat in the corner of the room. Countless, brightly colored glass spheres, indents, and figural ornaments of all sorts in red, white and blue adorned the tree. Electric, milk glass lights added a brilliance. Garlands finished the beautiful spectacle. As with the previous two families, a copper-headed child was present ~ a girl just like in the Victorian globe. She was opening what appeared to be a tea set and laughed with excitement when she finally got the entire present unwrapped. "Hmmm..., that's strange." She looked more closely at the young girl in the globe. "Her cheeks have dimples and her eyes curve up when she smiles or laughs!" "Why, she looks just like..." The thought halted as she looked around the room, spotting a copy of Charles Dickens, "A Christmas Carol, which had been put on a table. "The family will enjoy the story," she thought. It was what sat next to the book that gave her a start... Two snowglobes... Both of which looked just like the ones her Grandmother had given her. "What's going on? How is it that I have two snowglobes just like the two in this third one?" It was time to call Grandma. "Those globes I gave are you are special. I wanted to give you something to remember me by." It was all Grandma would say. Next week: Gifts #4 & 5 DID YOU KNOW...? **...that Thomas Edison’s assistant, Edward Johnson, came up with the idea of electric lights for Christmas trees in 1882? The new lights proved safer than the traditional candles. **...that the first electric Christmas tree lights were telephone switchboard lights? **...that the real St. Nicholas lived in Turkey? St. Nicholas was bishop of the Turkish town of Myra in the early 4th century. It was the Dutch who first made him into a Christmas gift-giver, and Dutch settlers brought him to America where his name eventually became the familiar Santa Claus. **...that a town in Indiana and another town in Idaho are both called Santa Claus? **...that the song, "Jingle Bells," was actually written for Thanksgiving? The song was composed in 1857 by James Pierpont, and was originally called "One Horse Open Sleigh." CHRISTMAS RECIPE "Oh, bring us some figgy pudding, Oh bring us some figgy pudding. Oh, bring us some figgy pudding, And a cup of good cheer!" Or so the song goes. Ever wonder how to make it? Well, here it is... ~ FIGGY PUDDING ~ 1/2 pound figs 1/4 cup candied lemon peel 1-1/4 cups bread crumbs 3 tablespoons melted butter 1 cup almonds or walnuts 4 eggs, beaten 1 cup light brown sugar 1/2 teaspoon of cinnamon 1/2 cup candied grapefruit peel 1/4 teaspoon of nutmeg Chop the figs and mix with bread crumbs. Brown the almonds or walnuts (if using almonds, they should be blanched and skinned and chopped; walnuts should be chopped). Mix with remaining ingredients. Put the mixture into a greased mold and steam 2-1/2 hours. (The pudding may also be baked at 325 degrees for 1 hour.) Moist, soft grapefruit peel adds a very good flavor. Serve with a brandy and cream sauce. CHRISTMAS MEMORIES From Jim: "The year, 1950, in Lakeside, Vermont, a suburb of Burlington, I was 5 and my brother Roger was 8. We knew Santa was coming that night, and we couldn't sleep. We raised the pull-shade next to our bed to see where he was, and we saw him walking down the sidewalk from Doctor Butterfield's house next door. We quickly, in an excited panic, pulled the shade down and squealed in delight. Then, we made the mistake of a lifetime....We raised the shade again to see where he was...and lo and behold!!! ...he was 6 inches from our faces right outside the storm window waving to us and saying, "Ho,ho,ho...Merry Christmas Roger and Jimmy." We died!!! "That Christmas I got a Victrola with two 78 records. One was the "Tennessee Waltz" and the other was "Put Another Nickel in the Nickelodeon." I also got a children's pair of skis. I was on top of the world that year with my music and skis. We didn't have much back then, but we didn't know that we didn't have much. Merry Christmas." From Jackie: "40 years ago a family tradition was started by my Grandparents with the birth of their first Grandson. My Mom, her 2 sisters and 2 brothers and their children spent Christmas Eve at my Grandparents house. Food galore, many presents to unwrap and precious memories. After Granddaddy & Grandma died, we still keep that Christmas Eve tradition alive. We have only missed one because of an ice storm and Christmas was not the same. "Today it is the sisters & brothers, their children and their children's children. During the year, we have lost 2 of our family members, an Aunt and her middle son. I have found some old slides of the family and will be doing a slide show this Christmas Eve. It will be a time to reflect on memories of long ago and be gracious for the family still here." From Jean: "One Christmas was different for me. (I hesitate to use the word "special" because every Christmas is special!) I grew up by the railroad tracks! This isn't as bad as it sounds! We lived on a farm in southern Minnesota and the railroad tracks just happened to cut through our farm. The tracks were about 1-1/2 blocks from our house. Also, the one-room country school that I attended was just across the road from our farm. "Unbeknownst to me, the crew on one of the daily trains watched me grow up, saw me walking to school with my crutches and, later, with my wheelchair. Then, all of a sudden, I disappeared! I was fine -- I had just finished eighth grade and was getting high school from private tutors at home.. "During this time, my Mother would be coming out of the barn after doing evening chores at the same time that the train went buy. She would blink the yard light at them and they would give several extra toots on their whistle. Just before Christmas one year Mother was hospitalized. The train crew kept up their whistles but there was no return blinking lights. When Mother was able, she sent a letter to the train crew thanking them for the extra whistles and how much they meant to our family, especially as Mother was gaining strength after her hospitalization. "It wasn't long before we got a return letter from the train crew telling how they enjoyed the "romance" of the lights and whistles and asking about me. Then they started throwing goodies off the train as they went by -- St. Paul/Minneapolis newspapers, often with candy wrapped in them, magazines, and other things. They were always very generous with gifts for my birthday and Christmas. "As the next Christmas approached they said they planned to stop the train at our crossing and give me a gift from all the crew. The stop was set for a Sunday evening. I was a guest at our church's Luther League Christmas party that evening and, when I had to leave the party, most of the young people followed along. The Christmas program was going on in the country school and, when the train came, the school emptied out -- including the teacher's fiance who was playing Santa for the evening! "The gift the train crew gave me was a swivel, adjustable desk chair with casters. Since I was doing my high school work at home, they decided I needed a comfortable chair! They also gave me many individual gifts and candy. This all made our local newspapers and was even in the St. Paul/Minneapolis newspapers. (I still have the chair some 50 years later.) "Bit by bit, the crew members retired but the ones who instigated the gifts, continued to send gifts at Christmas and my birthday. Now they are all deceased. It was a joy knowing these men -- they were a very special part of my life. "(The train stopped another time in warmer weather and gave me a parakeet, cage and lots of individual gifts.)" ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    12/14/2002 08:02:18
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. Correction 3. A Family Christmas, part II 4. Did you know...? 5. Christmas recipe 6. Christmas nostalgia TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. CORRECTION Last week under the "Did you know" section, I presented "... that Christmas trees were not popular in England until the German influence prevailed in the 19th century when Queen Victoria married a German nobleman, Prince Albert? He brought the first Christmas tree to Windsor Castle for the royal family in 1834... The numbers of the date are transposed. The date should read 1843. A FAMILY CHRISTMAS: Part II The early American Christmas globe captivated her all week. Watching the family in their daily routine gave her a first-hand insight. Of all of the family members in the globe, she liked the red-headed girl best. She was sure that, had she lived during that time, the two girls would have been best friends. One thing she noticed during the week was that the family didn't share much affection. She saw no family kisses and hugs exchanged. The children seemed to know they were loved, however. A look of pride came across the young boy's face on Tuesday when the father put his hand on the boy's shoulder. The man had indicated to the boy that he'd done something right. She also noticed that, though the family didn't have much in the way of home and belongings, they were happy. Unlike her own family, the parents spent every evening with their children. She'd made a new friend, even if it was a one-sided friendship. She put the first globe on her nightstand, sure that it was THE best Christmas present she'd ever received. Week 2: This week's gift was wrapped in silver and green paper and finished with a glittery silver ribbon and bow. It was really quite pretty. "Open it carefully," Grandmother's admonition from last week came back to her. Knowing what was inside the last gift, she was infintely more gentle with this second one. It was another snowglobe. *sigh* ...another one. A metal plate on the front said, "Louisville, Kentucky 1869." She set the globe on the coffee table and looked at it dejectedly. This simply was *not* what she wanted for Christmas! She hoped her Grandmother did a better job of gift selection with the next one, but had seriously begun to wonder now. The scene in the globe was pretty, again one with a family. This time she could see two rooms, one looking like a parlor and the other, a dining room. The wallpaper was bold, the furnishings ornate. Windows were covered in lace and richly-colored draperies. Just like the last one, the women and girls wore gowns. However, the men dressed much differently in this one; they wore regular pants instead of breeches and stockings. This time there were two women, one much older than the other. Six children and one man were also in the room. The children were playing with a puppy, laughing and giggling at its antics. One of the girls ~ the youngest of the children, had copper-red hair. She noticed the man did, too. Something is strange... so many of these people in the globes have her color of hair! Maybe her color wasn't such an unusual one, after all. The parlor windows were frosted a little and she could see through one with a curtain pulled back that it was snowing. Her attention was drawn to the room itself. Stockings hung from the mantle, blended with garlands and together framed a glowing fire of crackling pinecones. A small Christmas tree sat on a table in one corner of the parlor. Decorations showered the fir in candles, fans, glass trinkets, fruits, and strands of cranberries and popcorn. Paper cornucopias filled with nuts, candies, and other treats were among the ornaments. Topping the display was an angel with spun glass wings, a crinkled gold skirt, and a ceramic face. The tree wasn't as pretty as her family's but she guessed it was pretty enough for the day. The parlor had toys laying about, those she supposed had been received earlier in the day for Christmas. Dolls and dollhouses, board games, wind-up toys, rocking horses, and sleds added to the room's "lived-in" look for the day. A table held mittens, scarves, and sugar cookies which had also been presents. She could tell that many of the gifts were hand-made, only a few had been store-bought. It must have been time for dinner because everyone began moving into the dining room. Evergreens, flowers, and the best china and linens graced the dining room table. A sideboard was replete with a feast awaiting the family: roasted goose, ham, dressing, potatoes, cranberry pie, mince pie, plum pudding and Christmas cake. Soup started the meal, after blessing, of course. In all, she saw a huge difference between the Christmases of 1773 and 1869. She decided hers of today was better. Next week, would she finally get something for her doll collection? [We have the Victorians to thank for many of the Christmas season's joyful festivities and customs. They loved the holiday season and revived old traditions, such as caroling, and invented new ones like sending Christmas cards. Weeks before Christmas, Victorians began decorating their homes by tying evergreen branches to the posts and railings of their front porches, or draping them over their front door. They made wreaths from pine boughs, berries, dried fruit, pine cones, and ribbons, and hung them on the door to welcome guests during the holidays. The weeks before Christmas were spent preparing and socializing. The season was a time for parties; a time for love; a time to bring family and friends together in celebration. The wealthiest Victorians held grand balls and lavish parties during this time of year, and elite guests dressed in their fanciest clothing, waltzed through the night. The Victorians also promoted church-going, gift-giving, and charity to the poor as essential parts of the holiday. They transformed the folk figures of Father Christmas and Santa Claus into symbols of holiday generosity and they greatly popularized Germany's traditional Christmas tree, or Christbaum. Most of all though, the Victorians made Christmas a family celebration, with its primary focus on the Christ Child and children. A Victorian Christmas entailed the exchange of gifts between parents and children; attendance together at Church services; a multi-course family dinner; and visits with friends, relatives, and other families. The season was abuzz with exciting and fun activities both for children and families.] DID YOU KNOW...? ...that Christmas wasn't declared a federal holiday until June 26, 1870? ...that Louisiana and Arkansas recognized Christmas as a legal holiday in 1831? They were the first states to recognize the day at a time when celebrating it in Puritan New England could get a person fined or thrown into the stockade. Alabama followed in 1836. ...that before December 25th became the standardized legal date for the holiday, Christmas celebrations took placed on December 6th (St. Nicholas's Day), or on January 6th (Epiphany)? CHRISTMAS RECIPE This week's recipe is shared with you by Priscilla Haines <[email protected]>. "James Aaron Howell's daughter married Stannage Haines, a man from the German section of Nova Scotia. She corresponded back and forth with his people and I am sure exchanged recipes with them. This is one of the Christmas recipes from those good German cooks." [NOTE: Julianie Howell married Stannage Haines April 14, 1895. She was born 1875 in Iowa and died 1909 in Canada.] **Dark Fruit Cake** 10 oz. butter 5 eggs 1/2 lb flour 1/2 lb dark brown sugar 1/2 c. molasses 1/2 c. strawberry preserves 1/2 c. brandy 1 t. vanilla drop or two of bitter almond and rose extracts 1 t. mace 1 1/2 nutmeg, grated 1 T. allspice 1/2 t. soda 1 pk currants 2 pks seeded raisins 1/4 lb almonds, blanched and cut up 1/4 lb of orange and lemon peel, cut up 1/2 lb of citron peel, cut up 2 T flour mixed with fruit. Cream butter and sugar, add eggs one at a time unbeaten, molasses, preserves, brandy and flavorings. Then the spices and soda dissolved in a little warm water. Next the flour and the fruit last. Steam steadily for 4 or 5 hours and bake 1 hour in a slow oven. Allow to cool in pan. CHRISTMAS NOSTALGIA For the next three weeks, or for as long as I have stories, I'll print your memories in the Sunday Morning Coffee. I'll name your first name only and won't give your email address. Send your nostalgic story to me at <[email protected]> no later than Tuesday, December 10th. Not many stories came in this week, however four did. I present to you now, two of them: From George: "You were probably asking us to tell you of a best Christmas. I have had 75 plus of those.... However, in 1944 and just a kid of 18 I spent my 1st Christmas away from home. I had arrived 4 months earlier on the island of Petyilu in the Admiralty Islands and was assigned to VJ-2 Navy Squadron. No Christmas trees there. Only palm trees and bushes so we took sticks and built our own Christmas tree by wrapping it with strips of an old parachute trimmed it with nuts and bolts and sang carols till the wee hours of the morning. The war ended 9 months later and then came my best one. The Christmas of 1945 was enjoyed back at home." From Mary: "I'm 61 now and still have wonderful memories of childhood Christmas. There were 10 children in our family and never did a Christmas eve pass that we didn't have Santa come to our door after we had our baths and p.j.'s on with candy and small gifts for all. Then on Christmas morning there were more gifts to behold. The most memorable Christmas eve was in 1951 [when] my older brother was a dispatcher for our large city fire department. He called home after midnight and told my Dad about a house fire in which a family with children lost everything. Daddy promptly went down to our tree and removed several gifts that would have been from Santa and called my brother to find out where the family had been placed after the fire, filled up a basket with food, fruit and candy from our kitchen and along with toys for the children. He picked out clothing from our closets that might fit the sizes that were needed and took them to the family. The gifts that we gave were not missed by us and the lesson that we learned was never forgotten. We were blessed to be able to have given to others in their time of loss." ~~~~~~~~ It's family... and that's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    12/07/2002 08:04:25
    1. [ATEN] COLLEEN'S DECEMBER CHALLENGE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi everyone, Last challenge of the year, coming up!... December is the month many of us celebrate a special child's birth and gift-giving is at its highest level. Since giving is the predominant, worldwide monthly theme, we're going to pick up on that. This month's challenge is two-fold: 1.) Send in your births and christenings from our surname (or variant spelling); and/or... 2.) Send a gift to the list. Gifts might be be: * census extractions for a family or two * a biography * 3-4 generations of a family * a will * a deed * obituaries for a given period * immigration/emigration records * a family's bible record Your gift doesn't have to be limited to what I've given above; those were just some ideas. The point of this is to give a gift to the list and have some fun doing it. Select one or both challenges to work on ~ it's your choice. I hope you'll all have a safe and happy holiday season. Colleen

    12/01/2002 02:51:49
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. A Family Christmas: part I 3. Christmas Nostalgia: YOU write the story 4. Christmas recipes from 1879 5. Did you know...? TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. A FAMILY CHRISTMAS: Part I There are times, when our youth is passed, memories of what once was become a lifeline to those who once were. In the following story below, though fictional, a middle-aged woman reflects to a period now decades past... "These are my Christmas gifts to you, honey. You can open one each week, but the last one is to be opened on Christmas Day. Be careful with them, they're very special." Grandmother had handed the five, rather small boxes to her. Open them before Christmas? You bet! That wasn't going to be a problem for her! Eight-year olds aren't really known for patience, especially around Christmastime. She was certainly no exception! She selected the gift with the shiny, red paper and a gold bow. Wondering what it could be, she shook it. "Remember, be careful," warned her grandmother. Opened and unpackaged, she sat on the couch with a snowglobe in her lap. A snowglobe. How disappointing. She'd expected something for her doll collection. Instead, a snowglobe. Okay... on to something else. She hoped next week's present was better than this snowglobe. A snowglobe. She set it on the coffee table. Something in the globe caught her eye, causing her attention to return to it. Did something move? She picked the globe up again and really looked at it this time. On the base was a tiny metal plate bearing the words, "Philadelphia. December 25, 1773." The scene was of people that were dressed in really old-timey clothes, like Pilgrims wore, she thought. They were moving! Hey, this is cool! It's like watching TV, only in miniature! She looked more carefully at the scene in the globe. It appeared to be inside a one-room house. Four children and a woman were in the room. The woman was standing before a lit fireplace, preparing a meal. A man came in the door. She could could see past his shoulder outside, that it was snowing. No, she wasn't shaking the globe... He carried a dead goose by its feet. He handed the bird to the woman who immediately handed gave it over to their eldest daughter, a copper-headed girl 7 or 8 years old. Her own age? She looked a little more closely at the girl and realized they both had the same color of hair. The girl in the globe sat down and began pulling feathers from the goose. The girl's mother said, "When you get done there, I want you to help gut and clean it. After that we'll make the pudding." "Ew! Some Christmas!" muttered the girl holding the snow globe. How could her counterpart inside the globe be having any fun? [What our modern-day girl is watching are preparations for a colonial Christmas. When it was celebrated, it did not resemble a modern Christmas celebration. Aside from the metal plate on the globe, the only other indication of holiday fare was evergreens and mistletoe over the window and door. Christmas celebrations varied throughout the colonies, from the Puritans in New England who outlawed Christmas until the mid-19th century, to the Southern Anglicans whose revelries most closely match modern Christmas celebrations. For those who did celebrate Christmas, December 25th was considered the first day of the season, a season which lasted normally 12 days, until January 6th. Wherever Christmas was celebrated in early America, it generally did not include or emphasize children. Holiday events didn't center around youngsters, nor were they invited to attend. Church was for everyone, however feasts, parties, balls, fox-hunts, and fine entertainments were only for adults. The emphasis on Christmas as a magical time for children didn't come about until the nineteenth century. The Dutch and Germans in particular are to be thanked for centering Christmas in the home and within the family circle. Holiday feasts in the colonial period weren't what we have today. December was the right time for slaughtering, so fresh meat of all sorts they had, as well as some seafood. Beef, goose, ham, and turkey counted as holiday favorites. Some households also insisted on fish, oysters, mincemeat pies, and brandied peaches.] Next week: Gift #2 CHRISTMAS NOSTALGIA Nostalgia: (noun) 1. the state of being homesick: homesickness; 2. a wistful or excessively sentimental yearning for return to or of some past period or irrecoverable condition; something that evokes nostalgia. This holiday season I'd like to do something different. It's always *my* stories, *my* adventures, *my* nostalgia. This time, let's make it YOURS. We all have memories... we all have memories from Christmas past. What are your most poignant, most nostalgic ones? For the next four weeks, or for as long as I have stories, I'll print your memories in the Sunday Morning Coffee. I'll name your first name only and won't give your email address. Send your nostalgic story to me at <[email protected]> no later than Tuesday, December 3rd. I'll start this off with a memory of my own and I guess I should tell you all, this is a true story... THE NIGHT I SAW SANTA CLAUS My family and I had just come back to the United States from a tour of duty in Japan where my soldier-father had been stationed. In those days, troops (and their family members) took ships not planes. We docked in San Francisco on December 23rd and were picked up at the port by some very close friends of my parents. We went to their home for dinner and that's where I saw THE MOST beautiful tree lights I'd ever seen! They were bubble lights and I was completely entranced by them. (Those lights remained in my memories until adulthood, when I'd finally have bubble lights on my own tree.) My parents had two young daughters at the time, both of whom were very much into Santa Claus! However, our untimely arrival into California meant spending Christmas Eve in a hotel room. Actually, I don't think that was a bad thing, but my mother hated it. I don't know whose idea it was, nor do I know how it got there, but before my sister and I went to bed that night, we had a scrawny, sickly-looking 2' tree in our room with paper decorations on it. To my young eyes at the time, it was absolutely splendid! :) As a 5-year old, I was too excited to sleep. I knew ALL about this Santa business and I knew it meant PRESENTS! I worried, though, about how He was going to find us since we were in a hotel and not at home. There wasn't even a fireplace for him to come down. Daddy said he'd leave the door and the windows to our room open so Santa would be sure to find us. I'm sure I must have drifted in and out of sleep that night, or perhaps I'd really been able to stay awake... I looked around the darkened room. Everyone was still sleeping, so I knew it wasn't time to get up and open presents. Then, over in a corner of the room I saw movement! It came down the corner of the room (really!) from the ceiling. I figured it came in through the window that was a foot from the corner of the room. SANTA CLAUS!!!!! This took some quick thinking... I couldn't be awake! I ducked back under the covers, pulled them over my head, and closed my eyes. The next morning when we woke up, there were presents under the tree! It really was Santa that I'd seen; he really found us! As a result of that night, to this day nobody can tell me there isn't a real Santa. I know there is; I've seen him. :) ...And today, I can't help but wonder if that Christmas night in a hotel didn't today make my own family's Christmas a little more sparkly, a little more exciting, a little more special. CHRISTMAS RECIPES FROM 1879 Many of us are busy with major amounts of holiday cooking. I own a book, "Housekeeping in old Virginia," edited by Marion Cabell Tyree (Louisville, KY: John P. Morton & Company, 1879) that, for your enjoyment over the next couple weeks, I'll extract one or two (actual) recipes from. You can do some comparing of how our great grandmothers cooked, then and now. Keep in mind ~ they weren't cooking over the ranges we use today. Here's today's: CHRISTMAS PLUM PUDDING Half a loaf of bread (grated). 1 pound currants. 2 pounds stoned raisins. 1 pound chopped suet. 6 eggs. 2 pieces of citron, cup up. Beat the yolks of the eggs with two cups of flour and some milk, then stir in the other ingredients, adding a little salt and ginger. If too stiff, add more milk. The water must be boiling when the pudding is put in. It will take two hours to cook. TO ROAST GOOSE A goose must never be eaten the same day it is killed. If the weather is cold, it should be kept a week before using. Before cooking let it lie several hours in weak salt and water, to remove the strong taste. Then plunge it in boiling water, for five minutes, if old. Fill the goose with a dressing made of: Mealy Irish potatoes, boiled and mashed fine. A small lump of butter. A little salt or fresh pork chopped fine. A little minced onion. Parsley, thyme, and a pinch of chopped or powdered sage. Grease with sweet lard or butter. Lay in a pan with the giblets, neck, etc. Pour in two teacups of boiling water, set in a hot oven, and baste frequently. Turn so that every part may be equally browned. Serve with gravy or onion sauce. The above recipe will answer equally as well for duck. DID YOU KNOW...? ... that the first decorated tree was at Riga in Latvia, in 1510? Christmas trees became such a popular practice that by 1561 an ordinance was passed limiting the size of trees cut to 8 feet. Decorations on these trees were elaborate - candles, sweets and dolls. ... that Christmas trees were not popular in England until the German influence prevailed in the 19th century when Queen Victoria married a German nobleman, Prince Albert? He brought the first Christmas tree to Windsor Castle for the royal family in 1834. ... that tinsel was invented in Germany around 1610? At that time real silver was used, and machines were invented which pulled the silver out into the wafer thin strips for tinsel. Silver was durable, but tarnished quickly, especially with candlelight. Attempts were made to use a mixture of lead and tin, but this was heavy and tended to break under its own weight so was not so practical. So silver was used for tinsel right up to the mid-20th century. ... that Holly was considered to be magical because of its shiny leaves and its ability to bear fruit during the winter? It was believed that in a syrup it would stop coughs and that when hung over one's bed, would induce sweet dreams. It was also popular in the celebration of the Roman Saturnalia and it was the Romans who brought it to England. Family ... it's what we're all about. To you December babies - the cousins and I wish you a very happy and exciting year ahead. Happy Birthday! You are loved! Thank you for allowing me to spend this time with you today. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    12/01/2002 01:40:22
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. In Time TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. IN TIME Imagine with me for a moment... [Cattle valued at $5.00 a head in Texas brought tenfold that amount at a railhead. Thus began the cattle drives to railheads in Kansas.] "What the...!" He stood dumbfounded... completely dumbfounded. This just wasn't possible! Where the in the world WAS he? 1852 The day started at 4:00 A.M. ~ just like any other. Most of the men lost track of the days when they were on the trail; he was one of them. He knew the year, but that's about as far as it got. It seemed to him that they'd been driving the herd of 3,000 longhorn cattle northward for a little over a month. With only 12 men on the crew working 18 hours a day to go about 60 miles (if they were lucky), the job was tough and boring. "Grub pile! Come a runnin' boys!" the cook yelled out. Breakfast time. He and the rest of the men finished pulling on their pants and boots, and rolled their bedrolls. They were ready to get the herd moving again as soon as they'd finished breakfast ~ a meal that was guaranteed to be filling, usually consisting of boiled beans, fried bacon, sourdough biscuits, and black coffee. The herd got moving well enough that morning. For about 2-1/2 hours, the cattle were allowed to graze while Cook put his supplies put away from the breakfast meal and got the checkwagon properly stowed. Then, whistles and shouts of "Ho!" were heard as the cowboys began driving the cattle back onto the trail. The men had taken their positions around the herd; he rode the right flank. The trail boss had ridden ahead for a mile to ensure the trail was still good, that there would be water, and they'd have no problems. Longhorn steers could go for about four days without water before becoming unmanageable and head back toward where they last remembered water to be - many dying along the way. The boss was also trying to avoid any situations that would frighten the cattle and cause a stampede. Doing anything to keep the skittish herd calm was necessary. The cattle meant money, and to keep each steer fattened meant the trip had to be a slow-paced, easy one. Stampedes usually lasted about four miles and caused the cattle to drop about 50 pounds each. In addition, cattle were lost by crushing or goring during the run. Life, though boring at the moment, was pretty good. He had a girl back home that he hoped to marry one day when he got himself enough money. All he owned now was the clothes on his back, his bedroll, and a gun. Thoughts of his own ranch, a wife, and kids filled his mind and temporarily took him away from the heat, choking dust, danger and drudgery. The pay for this job wasn't too bad ~ $15.00 a month, room, board, tobacco, and a promised $5.00 bonus at the end of the trail if the cattle arrived healthy. He'd been with this outfit for a little over a year. He didn't know though, if he'd stay at this work much longer. Marriage, a ranch and family pulled heavily at him. Dinner at noon was a welcomed break for the cowboys, horses and cattle alike. The horses and cattle were allowed to graze and drink water from the river they had stopped at. The men sat down to a meal of sowbelly, sourdough biscuits, white gravy, and black coffee. They knew they'd probably be eating the same tasteless, but filling meal at supper tonight. They were back on the trail 2 hours later. Early in the afternoon he'd noticed the clouds beginning to build up. Now, they were dark, rumbling and menacing. This couldn't be good. CRACK! A bolt of lightining snapped everyone to immediate attention to the herd. CRACK! CRACK! A lightning storm! Staaaaaaampeeeeeedddddeee! Cattle, and to a lesser extent horses, are a notoriously skittish bunch. It didn't take much to set off a general panic, but lightning out on the range made even the cowboys nervous. Storms took their toll on cowmen as well as the cattle. They feared these storms because, not only could it stampede a herd, but the lightning could also kill. Within seconds, they had a real concern on their hands. He and the crew had to get those cattle under control! He spurred his horse on alongside the herd, trying to keep them in line. Several broke loose. He chased them up a hill to their right, his lasso pulled and ready if he needed it. His horse was in a full run and breathing hard. A breeze caressed his check. It seemed to whisper of something to come... They arrived at the top of the hill. The rain had stopped and the sun had come back out. The sun was in his eyes, and he strained to find the strays. What he saw was NOT what he'd expected... "What the...!" He got off his horse, unsure of what he was looking at. There he stood dumbfounded... completely dumbfounded. This just wasn't possible! Where the in the world WAS he? He looked around and realized that wherever he was, he was alone. The stampeding herd, the strays, the trail crew, were gone. A road ran by the hill... a strange looking, black road filled with even stranger looking... what are they... wagons without horses? They were THE fastest wagons he'd EVER seen! Instead of a vacant expanse of gently rolling land, he was amazed to see thousands of buildings! They were so crowded together he wondered if some of them were actually one. A noise, a rumbling in the sky pulled his view upwards. What is that... a machine that flies? He couldn't believe what he was seeing? On the side of the road a man and two women were bent down next to one of the horseless wagons. They seemed to be looking at the right front, like there was a problem. That isn't what caught his eye as much as the women... they're half naked! He could see their arms and legs! And, they had no hats! He was shaken, visibly shaking. This was NOT his world! Was he dreaming? Nobody was riding a horse. He tied his horse off to a post about 10 feet to his left that, along with another one, held up the biggest colored picture he'd ever seen! He began walking down the hill and not watching where he was walking, kicked something. He picked it up. It was a can of some sort with a hole in one end; it was certainly much lighter than the ones he was accustomed to... and with a hole in one end? At the bottom of the hill, he looked more closely at the trail running in front of him. He was impressed with the way it held together. He crossed the road, but didn't look where he was going and nearly got hit! "Hey buddy, get out of the road!" a voice yelled at him. A loud, blaring noise followed the voice. This world was too crowded, too noisy, and everyone moved too fast. But he had to see more. He continued to cross the trail and walked down a small hill to a parking area for the wagons. He was astounded! The wheels weren't wood, nor were they metal; they even had glass windows! The land was full of these wagons. The way these people were dressed embarrassed him ~ they were as half-naked as those he first spotted; but he couldn't help looking at them. Everyone seemed perfectly comfortable and happy, even their children. He did notice though, that he'd begun to draw attention to himself. He looked down at his extremely dusty clothes and suddenly felt self-conscious at his lack of cleanliness. Walking in a dust cloud didn't stop him though. He was enthralled at what he was seeing. He walked toward the building which turned out to have many doors, but it seemed to be a store. He walked up to one of the doors and all of a sudden it moved... right in front of him! Moved, it did! Inside the store he immediately felt cooler. The general store had never been this cool. It felt good. He was disappointed when he didn't find a pickle barrel. In front of him steps were moving up. He could see there was another floor, but those moving steps he wasn't sure of. A child and her mother walked in front of him and onto the steps. The two appeared safe enough. Over there on the wall... moving pictures? He was drawn to them! Windows with moving pictures... wait till he told the men! The men!... the herd!... the stampede! His horse! He hurried back to the door. It opened before him again. Incredible! To the right of the door was a box with newspapers inside. He looked at the date... November 24, 2002. No, this couldn't be... He ran across the land filled with the wagons, ran up the hill and back across the trail. He looked up the hill and saw his horse, still tethered to the pole and grazing quietly. This wasn't his world. He didn't know where he was, nor how he got here, but he knew he didn't belong. He walked back up the hill to his horse, untethered her and climbed on. With one more look he turned the horse back to the other side of the hill. A few steps later he saw the strays and felt the rain beating down on him. He looked back over his shoulder and saw dark clouds and vast expanses. Impossible, you say? THANKSGIVING MESSAGE FROM COLLEEN I'd like to take this opportunity to tell you just how much your friendship means to me. For myself, it is the gift of family and friends that are the riches in my life ~ those precious times that we hold dear to our heart and memories and special moments that can never be replaced, neither by time nor all the wealth in the world. Whether you have planned a grand feast surrounded by friends and family, an intimate candlelight dinner for two, or a simple frozen dinner or takeout, it is not really the edible food, but rather who we share the meal with that counts most of all. To me, this is the true value and meaning of Thanksgiving. I give thanks for you all, friends and cousins. You have touched my life in many ways and I am a very wealthy individual for this. I will be thinking of you during this season of Thanksgiving, and even though we are separated by miles, you will be close to me in my heart. Please remember our men and women who are serving our country and can't be with their loved ones this year, as well as those who were lost in the tragedy of September 11, 2001. I will be observing a moment of silence in their honor this year. I hope your Thanksgiving is filled with love, happiness and hope! Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. Happy Thanksgiving everyone! ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    11/24/2002 12:48:05
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. In Memory of Riders, part IV: notes, trivia, recommended reading TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. IN MEMORY OF RIDERS, Part IV: NOTES, TRIVIA, RECOMMENDED READING The story of our little band of siblings ended last week. However, it began a shadowed trail for their descendants... When the orphan trains began, planners and participants paid little or no attention to the ways that placing-out altered families. Today, researchers who retrace the journeys of riders often find the trip filled with obstacles and frustration. It isn't my goal here, though, to teach you how to research children of orphan trains, but to relate a final portion of their story in an effort to continue enlightening you on one of the most tragic yet heartwarming stories in American history. If you plan to begin searching for a rider on the trains, a good place to start is at <http://www.ancestry.com/library/view/ancmag/701.asp?rc=locale%7E&us=0>. [Note that the URL is split and you will have to copy and paste both lines, taking one line at a time. Be sure to put the entire string together, leaving no spaces.] In 1901, Missouri banned orphan trains. However, the law wasn't effective because it was never enforced. After having run for 75 years, the last official orphan train pulled into Trenton, Grundy County, Missouri in 1929. The Children's Aid Society and the New York Foundling Hospital, however, placed-out children until 1930. There are several documented orphan train riders that rode west unofficially in 1930. Social reforms make the cessation of the orphan train movement easy to understand: ** With the onset of the Great Depression in 1930, the midwest had a decreased need for farm labor. It was extremely hard now for familes to take on another child. ** Newly instituted laws and programs were designed to help children, specifically. These laws made it difficult or impossible for trainloads of orphans to move from one state to another. Other laws limited hours children could work. ** Social service agencies increased their efforts to keep struggling families together. The rise of the welfare system helped with financial support for children. It made a major difference in the lives of children who, in an earlier year, might have ended up on the streets. ** Individual and small-group foster homes replaced large institutions and orphanages of the past. ** New programs helped immigrants find jobs and housing when they arrived in America. In 1996, an estimated 500 orphan train riders were still living. All are now at least 80 years old, or older. Many of them and their descendants have spent years searching for their natural families. Some have been reunited with lost siblings or other family members. Others, content with their new lives, never felt the need. The Orphan Train Heritage Society, located in Springdale, Arkansas, serves as a clearinghouse of information about the orphan trains and their riders. The society publishes a quarterly newsletter, answers research requests, and helps locate missing family members who rode the trains. In addition, orphan train reunions are held in many areas. It often happens at these get-togethers that siblings, separated from each other for years, are reunited! You might wonder how anyone could be so heartless as to break-up so many families. Due to the enormous influx of immigrants from Europe, jobs were scarce. Their extended families were not available. At that time, children were property with no rights. Child protection agencies and welfare did not exist. If relatives did not help, very few of these children had anyone to turn to. The orphan trains were needed at the time they happened. They were not the best answer, but they were the first attempts at finding a practical system. Many children who would have died, lived to have children and grandchildren. It is estimated that over two million descendants descend from the riders. Looking at the whole situation positively, one must say the trains gave the children a fighting chance to grow up. DID YOU KNOW... ...that train riders, Andrew Burke and John Brady, grew up to become governors of North Dakota and of Alaska, respectively? Other children placed in the West went on to great successes: three county commissioners, two district attorneys, one congressman, one sheriff, and numerous bankers, lawyers, physicians, journalists, ministers, teachers and businessmen. ...that orphan trains took children to 47 of the 50 states? ...that the orphan train movement was the beginning of children's rights? From the trains came the children's protection laws, school lunches, medical treatments, and the beginnings of the welfare system. ...that the first U.S. orphanage reportedly was established in 1729 after Indians massacred settlers near Natchez, Mississippi. FOR MORE INFORMATION: Organizations: New England Home for Little Wanderers, 850 Boylston Street, Suite 201, Chestnut Hill, MA 02167 New York Children’s Aid Society, 105 East 22nd Street, New York, NY 10021 New York Children’s Aid Society, Office of Closed Records, 150 East 45th Street, New York, NY 10017. New York Foundling Hospital, Department of Closed Records, 590 Avenues of the Americas, New York, NY, 10001 New York Juvenile Asylum Alumni Affairs, Children’s Village, Dobbs Ferry, NY 10007 Orphan Train Heritage Society of America, Inc., P.O. Box 496, Johnson, AR 72741-0496 Orphan Train Heritance Society of America, 614 East Emma Ave., #115, Springdale, AR, 72764-4634, 501 756-2780. Videos: "The American Experience: "Orphan Trains" by Janet Graham and Edward Gray, 1994. Produced by PBS. "Orphan Train" with Jill Eikenberry, Kevin Dobson and Glenn Close. Released: 1979. Books: Brace, Emma. "The Life and Letters of Charles Loring Brace," 1894. Fry, Annette R. "The Orphan Trains," 1994. Holt, Marilyn Irvin. "The Orphan Trains: Placing Out in America," 1994. Available in paperback. O'Connor, Stephen. "Orphan Trains." Houghton Mifflin, 2001. Johnson, Mary Ellen (ed.) "Orphan Train Riders: Their Own Stories, volumes I-V." Baltimore, MD: Gateway Press, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996. Johnston, Carole Turner. "Trains West." Patrick, Michael, Evelyn Sheets, and Evelyn Trickel. "We Are A Part of History." Santa Fe, NM: Lightning Tree Press, 1990. Vogt, Martha Nelson, and Christina Vogt. "Searching for Home: Three Families from the Orphan Trains." Grand Rapid, MI: Triumph Press, 1986. Warren, Andrea. "Orphan Train Rider: One Boy's True Story." Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1996. Warren, Andrea. "We Rode the Orphan Trains." Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 2001. Sites: History for Children: Street Arabs ~ It isn't just for children.<http://www.suite101.com/article.cfm/history_for_children/18538> How the Other Half Lives ~ An online book. Especially touching is Chapter 15: "The Problem of the Children." TOC page is <http://www.yale.edu/amstud/inforev/riis/contents.html> International Orphan Movements ~ the United States wasn't alone in placing-out children. <http://www.orphantrainriders.com/International.html> Orphan Trains to Iowa ~ part of the Iowa GenWeb. This is a MUST SEE site if you're tracing a rider. <http://iagenweb.org/iaorphans/> Migration: Orphan Trains Homepage ~ <http://drake.marin.k12.ca.us/academics/comacad/imm_mig%2001/Orphan%20Web/orphan%20page/Index.html> The Orphan Train Collection ~ <http://www.orphantrainriders.com/> ~~ END ~~ Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    11/16/2002 07:36:51
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. In Memory of The Riders, part III TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. IN MEMORY OF THE RIDERS, Part III: GOODBYE, NEW YORK July, 1857 They'd been in the orphanage nearly three months now. Institution food was rather tasteless, but at least it was sustaining. His youngest sister's pneumonia had cleared up all right; however, she didn't run and play like she once did. Her energy levels just hadn't returned to their original, healthy state. He and his other two sisters though, were a different story. Free from constant worry for their safety and survival, the dark circles of exhaustion beneath the children's eyes had disappeared and their health was fully restored. The facility they were currently residing in was extremely crowded. Three hundred children were living in a space originally meant for 150. Our little band of siblings, along with two hundred others, wouldn't be there much longer though. They'd all been selected for relocation... The night before their day of departure, the children were told that they were going on the train. They were bathed, given new clothing, and their hair was tended to. Each child received a small suitcase with a Bible, two travel outfits and a set of dress clothes, but no shoes. He wondered if he and his sisters were being taken to their father. How wonderful that would be! [Most children thought that the train ride was an exciting adventure. Few understood what was happening. Once they did, their reactions ranged from delight at finding a new family to anger and resentment at being "placed out" when they had relatives back home. They lost all means of contacting their relatives. They were never to speak, or think of their birth families again. They were expected to totally start over with new families. Depending on their ages, the children would or wouldn't remember their old lives. The babies certainly would have no memories. The train ride lasted anywhere from days to weeks. When the placing-out programs were initiated, some of those first orphan trains were little better than cattle cars with seats and make-shift bathroom facilities. Later, as more money became available, the riders were able to ride in better cars. The last riders were able to ride in sleeping cars (Pullmans).] Handbills heralded the distribution of cargoes of needy children: ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ WANTED HOMES FOR CHILDREN A company of homeless children from the East will arrive on FRIDAY, AUGUST 21st, 1857 These children are of various ages and of both sexes, having been thrown friendless upon the world. They come under the auspices of the Children's Aid Society of New York. They are well disciplined, having come from the various orphanages. The citizens of this community are asked to assist the agent in finding good homes for them. Persons taking these children must be recommended by the local committee. They must treat the children in every way as a member of the family, sending them to school, church, Sabbath school and properly clothe them until they are 17 years old. Come and see the children and hear the address. Distribution will take place at the Opera House, Friday, August 21, at 1:30 p.m. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ [The trains pulled into towns and the children disembarked to be led to the local opera house, the town hall, or the local church. There, they were paraded on a stage or platform before the crowd of onlookers. Usually, a local town committee had been at work prior to the arrival of the train, trying to line up good potential families for the expected children. At this time, members of the community would be allowed to visit with and inspect the children. If a match-up was made between adult and child, and the local committee and placing agents were in agreement, then the child would leave the group and go on to his/her new home.] A lot of the children, including our family of siblings, didn't know what to think! New parents? New families? He gathered his sisters around him. They clung to one another fiercely. "Stand up straight, all of you!" the agent scolded as she wrenched the four apart. The two eldest girls began crying. "I need a good farm hand," a scruffy-looking man said. He reached over and felt for the muscle on the arm of the 14-year old boy standing two children down from him in the line. "Open your mouth, boy!" With his dirty hands the old man began examining the boy's teeth. The boy wasn't frightened, but he was angry. He bit the farmer's hand. The farmer backhanded the boy to the ground. That placing wasn't going to happen. An old man with a white beard approached the eldest of his younger sisters and pointed a bony finger at her. "I'll take that one!" he boomed. "My wife is sick, and I need someone to keep house, cook, and wash the dishes." The agent standing behind his sister pushed her forward from the line toward the man. Within minutes, she would become his ward. Some of the children sang or danced trying to attract the attention of new mothers and fathers. Sometimes the ploy worked. A woman stood before his youngest sister. "I'll take her. She looks just like my Elizabeth before she died. We'll give her a good home." She took the 2-year old's hand and walked away. He and the second of his three sisters had only each other now. Both of them felt the pain of broken hearts. Requisite forms were completed, then the families were free to take the children home. At the end of the viewing, those children not chosen today were walked back to the train; he was among them. The next town was waiting for their opportunity. He and his sister watched from the window of the train, tearfully attempting to get just one more glimpse of their two sisters. Two towns and three days later, his third sister was placed. A well-dressed man and woman approached the line. "We need a girl to help tend our young'uns. We'll take good care o' ya." She had no choice but to go with them. More forms were completed and the last of his siblings was removed from his life. He was alone now. [Placement into new families was casual at best. While a local committee attempted to ensure that new parents were fit raise children, it really was not much of a background investigation compared to today. Officials knew that placing out was imperfect and did what they could to screen inappropriate families. Sadly, a rather large number of foster parents saw the children as nothing more than a source of cheap labor. Often brothers and sisters were separated by the fostering process, sometimes never to see each other again. If brothers and sisters were lucky, they were taken by families in the same area so they could visit. If they were not lucky, brother, or sister, would get back on the train without them and go many miles further down the track. It was not uncommon for brothers and sisters to lose track of each other completely. Despite problems, the system provided the best chance for many children. While separating siblings (like was usually the case) was not the best idea in the world, it was much better than leaving them to their fates on the streets. On the farms and in towns there was room, food, parents, and safety. There was a chance to go to school. They could grow up and become someone of which America could be proud. Many of these children obtained loving homes and parents.] He spent another week on the train which left a small part of its cargo at each stop until finally all of the agent's charges found homes. At this point, the number of remaining children was just a quarter of what it was when they'd started this trip. He'd begun to think nobody wanted him. A woman stood before him and spoke to the agent. "I want that boy because he has his hair combed. I'm sure he is a good little boy. He doesn't appear half so rough as the rest." She filled out the requisite paperwork and took him home. It turned out that she was a gentle woman who'd wanted a son; nothing more. He matured through his teen years with love and caring. He could only hope the same for his sisters. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ It wasn't until he'd reached his 30's that he saw the middle of the three sisters again. Luckily he'd been able to make contact with the her during his early 20's. When she reached adulthood, his sister began searching for the other two siblings. They found the eldest of the three girls, now married with two children of her own! A twelve-year search failed to locate the youngest of the siblings. They did manage to find out that her name had been changed by her foster parents. And so it went with many of the children ~ never seeing family again; never knowing their former lives. The trains ran for 75 years with the last one pulling into Trenton, Missouri in 1929. Any orphan train riders still living today would be at least 85 years old or older. The Orphan Trains were needed at the time they happened. They were not the best answer, but they were the first attempts at finding a practical system. Many children that might have died, lived to have children and grandchildren. Over two million people today are descendants of these former children. The trains gave them a fighting chance to grow up. ~FINIS~ Next week: Notes, Trivia, Recommended Reading. Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    11/09/2002 09:29:24
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. Message from Colleen 3. In Memory of Riders, part II TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. MESSAGE FROM COLLEEN There are times when I write from the heart that I get so caught up in my stories and fail to watch my dates and facts. Last week's issue of the Sunday Morning Coffee story was a glaring example. Normally, I or one of my proofreaders will catch any error during a proofing. Not so, last week. Five of us re-read the story and, although two of us know when the Statue of Liberty was built (1886), we all missed it. The story enrapt everyone, especially me. My mind was too "into" the story and not paying attention to the facts. I do apologize and promise not to let that happen again. For those of you who wrote me, thank you for catching the error and being so kind and gentle when telling me. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ In 1820, the U.S. population was about 9.6 million. Within four decades, 5 million European immigrants would arrive, nearly all from Ireland, England and Germany. By 1900, 16 million Irish had come to America, and the population was 76.1 million. In most cases they left poverty and oppression. Sadly, the immigrants sometimes exchanged a bad situation in their native country for an even worse in New York and other industrial cities... IN MEMORY OF THE RIDERS, Part II: INTO THE SYSTEM April, 1857 Orphans ... Foundlings ... Waifs ... Half-Orphans ... Street Arabs ... Street Urchins ... He and his sisters had been labeled five of those six appelations. At first it hurt to have those terms applied to him and his siblings. It made him think that nobody cared that their mother had died and their father still didn't know it. Nobody cared that they'd been thrown out on the street. They weren't orphans... were they? A tear slid down his cheek. No time for tears... Life was extremely difficult now. Not only were he and his sisters fighting to feed themselves, but they were fighting for their very survival. Their stomachs hurt most of the time now because they were so hungry. Unable to get a good night's sleep, the three eldest were exhausted. It was important that they not sleep too deeply, having to keep an eye out for anyone who could hurt them. Lucky for them, the worst of the winter was gone. Nights were chilly, but not freezing. There were *so, so* many children in their same situation... well, almost... He found that the term "orphan" didn't actually mean what everyone perceived it to be. Some of the children were like he and his sisters ~ "half-orphans," where one parent had died and the remaining parent could not (or would not) care for them. Some of the children still had both parents, but had been thrown out by their parents because the family had grown too large and they couldn't care for all the children. He wondered if those children felt worse emotionally than he and his sisters did. At least it wasn't their parents that put them on the streets. [Actually, children with living parents, as well as brothers and sisters, were the norm, not the exception. Parents gave up their children because of destitution, spousal desertion, widowhood, or birth out of wedlock. Others were simply abandoned or orphaned by parents victimized by grinding poverty of the slums, relentless diseases or drug and alcohol addiction. And then, some were runaways ~ from neglect, abuse, and drunkeness. Some were true orphans - their parents having died. Others were the victims of parents who threw away their parental responsibility for one reason or another.] He and his sisters ultimately survived on the streets by begging, stealing, picking pockets, selling items they had stolen. When they grew older, the girls faced a life of prostitution to survive - a sad future for his sisters. He looked over at his youngest sister, her eyes red and nose runny due to a cold. He determined that that was *not* going to happen to any of his sisters! When a child of the streets stands hopelessly before you in rags, with a tear-stained face... [About 1830, the problem of homeless children mushroomed in large eastern cities that were ports of entry for immigrants, particulary New York. Orphanages were few in number and grossly overcrowded. Children typically received minimal food, education and attention. Institutional solutions were uncommon before the early 19th century, and relatives or neighbors usually raised children who had lost parents. Arrangements were informal and rarely involved courts. By age 14, youngsters were expected to leave and to make their own way in life. Charles Loring Brace, a Congregational minister from Connecticut, was horrified by the conditions he saw on the streets of New York City. Brace resolved there was only one way to help these children ~ he would provide more than just the requisite food, clothing, and shelter. He felt that education, and the opportunity to learn a trade were necessary in properly caring for children. In 1853, with support from a group of New York City businessmen, Brace founded the Children's Aid Society. For a short while, he tried helping the children with his institutions ~ establishing schools for them, teaching the boys a trade, inviting volunteer ladies to help teach the girls the proper way to behave and dress, establishing a "savings bank" to teach the boys to save their money rather than gamble it away. However, just a year after founding the Children's Aid Society Brace realized he needed help. There were so many children requiring assistance that the Society was unable to care for them. Brace employed a modified version* of the plan that Boston had tried ten years earlier ~ sending many of the children to the rural midwest by train and placing them out to families at the various stops along the way who were willing to "adopt" them. The Boston plan allowed for children to be taken on as indentured servants, however this was not an acceptable option to Brace. He developed what he called "the family plan." This meant that a child, taken into a home, would be treated as part of the family. (*Brace's modified version of Boston's program was to become a forerunner of modern foster care.) Brace was convinced that the street children would find many benefits in rural America. He expected adopting families to provide the orphans with the same food, clothing, education, and trade and spiritual training that they would for their own biological children. Brace also believed a good work ethnic developed by living on a farm in the west or midwest would help them to grow into mature responsible adults able to care for themselves. In 1854 he persuaded the board of the Children's Aid Society to send the first trainload of orphans west. Railroads were the least expensive way to move children westward from orphanages, poor houses and off the streets. The first Children's Aid Society train left New York on September 20, 1854, with 46 ten-to-twelve-year-old boys and girls onboard. Their destination was Dowagiac, Michigan... the orphan trains were born. In addition, all 46 children were successfully placed in new homes... and America's first "foster children" were placed.] April, 1857 It wasn't long before the four members of our little band was collected up, placed in an orphanage, and set up to be moved west. "Actually, it was a good thing we were found," he thought. His youngest sister's cold had gotten worse; she'd contracted pneumonia. Medical treatment would make her better, he just knew it. They were all filthy, a result of living on the streets. The girls' hair was matted and full of lice, their were clothes ripped, stained and muddy. He was equally unkempt. All of them had sunken eyes from a lack of good nutrition. None of the children had shoes; they'd been stolen last month. One night they had shoes, the next morning they didn't; it was that simple to him and the girls. Hunger ~ the driving pangs of hunger had driven them to shoplifting... A police officer watched the three eldest siblings as they tried to steal fruit from a grocer's display rack that was sitting on the sidewalk against the store window. The youngest of the elder three couldn't run fast enough and the chase ended when she was caught. He and the eldest of the three girls wouldn't leave their sister. After being taken to the police station, they finally got someone to go after their youngest sibling. She'd been laying in a box in an alley two blocks from the store, hungry and desperately needing medicine. "Someone will help us now," he thought. What he didn't realize was that their situation would get even worse... [In 1869 the Sisters of Charity of St. Vincent de Paul established the New York Foundling Asylum (later changed to Hospital). The Foundling, as it was later called, sought to save abandoned and unwanted newborns, infants, and small children from death; it cared for unwed mothers, as well. In the beginning, a child could be left with no information given at all. It was simply placed in a basket on a turntable where a Sister in the building would turn the platform and bring the baby inside without the adult ever being seen. This encouraged people to save the baby by remaining anonymous. As knowledge of the basket spread, it wasn't long before there were more children than they could adequately care for. Thus began the Foundling's "baby trains." Soon thousands of children were riding the rails to new homes. Among them would be our little family... Next week: Goodbye, New York Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    11/03/2002 12:29:21
    1. [ATEN] COLLEEN'S NOVEMBER CHALLENGE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. Hi family, November is the month of the veteran ~ someone to whom we all owe a "thank you." In honor of these brave men and women who serve to protect us, I challenge the entire list to tell us something about (at least) 10 veterans of our surname who served during any war, whether they saw combat or not. Kindly remember ~ as much as we owe our living veterans a "thank you," we do not discuss them here. This is for their and their family's safety, Only those who have passed on count towards the 10. This ought to keep you busy! :-D Colleen

    11/01/2002 03:16:52
    1. [ATEN] SUNDAY MORNING COFFEE
    2. Colleen Pustola
    3. ) ( ( ) Good Morning Family! ( \ .-.,--^--. ( Come on in. . . \* ) \\|`----'| - The coffee pot's on. . . .=|=. \| |// ...and we even have decaf, |~'~| | |/ tea, and hot chocolate! | | \ / _|___|_ ------ (_______) Today's topics include: 1. Welcome to new cousins 2. A message from Colleen 3. In Memory of Riders, part I TO OUR NEWEST COUSINS ~~ On behalf of the entire family, I'd like to extend a most hearty welcome to those cousins who came into the family fold this past week. We are very glad to have you with us and hope you'll stay and remain a part of our online family. As soon as you're comfortable with us and the list, please send in your list-surname lines so we can all see how we're related to you. We do not have a fancy format for sending in records or queries to the list. Post as many as you wish! If the data has anything to do with our list-surname ancestors that might help someone, please feel free to post it. Every scrap of information is appreciated. You're welcome to share this Coffee with your genealogy friends and relatives. If they are not members of our online family and would like to begin receiving the Coffee, they are now able to. Simply have them send a blank email to <[email protected]>. A MESSAGE FROM COLLEEN Many of you have emailed me thinking you hadn't received your Sunday Coffee. There have been no Coffees for the past three weeks. I have been terrifically busy helping my daughter get her April, 2003 wedding together. From now until March, 2003 I will do Sunday Coffees as I'm able. From March until May, 2003 Coffees will temporarily be suspended. I believe (read the operative word, "believe") I'll be free for the next several Sundays. So, I've written a historical story/narration for you that will come out in several weekly parts. I hope you enjoy it. IN MEMORY OF RIDERS, Part I [NOTE: Although the following story could be (and just may have been) true, this story is a fictional one with factual narration in brackets.] [In 1618, 200 English boys were sent to Richmond, Virginia, to work on plantations, beginning Britain's history of ridding itself of surplus population, including children. They'd been "rescued" from family, the streets, and workhouses, then shipped to established colonies or planters' outposts in the New World. Many were exported to penal colonies for perceived misdemeanors such as stealing food. One 19th century government official noted that the problem was "that there were too many children in the streets of London" and elsewhere. At the time, there was no free education or meaningful intervention by the government to assist the poor. The Industrial Revolution shut thousands of people out of the workforce. When slavery was abolished, a new demand was created for the cheapest alternative labor force - children. The Great Famine swept all of Europe but was particularly severe in Ireland and simply exacerbated matters. Hundreds of thousands flocked to England's industrial centers which were ill-prepared to accommodate them. Slums and their attendant problems grew at a rapid rate. Child migration was seen as the cheapest way of saving children while easing a costly social economic, political and moral problem. In 1853, the United States began surveying railroad routes to the Pacific, mapping four different ones. Poster, flyers and advertisements went to Europe and the rest of the world extolling the virtues of coming to America and getting "free land." Many were led to believe America was the "land of opportunity," the "land of milk and honey," and the "land of a second chance" they so desperately wanted for themselves and their children. Many left their homelands because of poor harvests, famines, political unrest and revolutions.] May, 1852 It was an exciting time! Seeing the Statue of Liberty close-up relayed to everyone on the ship that they'd arrive in the golden land of opportunity ~ the United States! In these modern times it only took three months to make the crossing, though it wasn't always a smooth ride. He was glad they'd be reaching land soon. His parents and three sisters looked as eager as he felt. He'd gotten seasick only during the first storm they'd encountered, but Mother was ill during most of the voyage. Her skin was sallow and her eyes sunken with dark circles under them. She refused to stay below, wanting that first glimpse of Liberty herself. With Father's help, she was able to stand near the ship's railing and watch as Liberty came closer into view. "How beautiful ~ that majestic lady!" [Between 1841 and 1860, 4,311,465 immigrated to America. This heavy influx lead to overcrowding in port cities, even with temporary housing. Tenements sprang up, often housing ten or more persons to a room. Overcrowded conditions in these tight quarters led to disease and death. Jobs became scarce and labor was cheap.] August, 1852 He couldn't remember ever being so hungry! As a matter of fact, his whole family was hungry! Their living conditions were deplorable, certainly worse than when they lived in the old country. ...And he was tired, so tired. He and his 6- and 7-year old sisters worked in a mill to help his parents make ends meet. The 4-year old stayed with a neighbor until one of them came home. Even with four in the family working however, food and comfort had become words seemingly intended for the high class ~ the rich. At the age of 9, found working in the mill for 24 cents a day extremely hard. His sisters showed their own physical conditions through their tired, gaunt faces. With exception of his youngest sister, being able to play and have fun wasn't something the children experienced much of, anymore. [Without the extended family (grandparents, aunts, uncles) to rely upon in times of need, young families fell apart. Children as young as six years old were working to help support the family. Food became scarce. Job safety was not a priority causing many men to be killed in accidents at sea and at other work places. This left women and children to make their own way living as best they could.] December, 1852 He knew it was coming ~ just knew it. Mother came off the ship still sick and though treated by the doctor at Ellis Island, never fully recovered. Then, late in November, she got pneumonia. His father had gone west in October, hoping to find a better job. "There just *had* to be something to all those glorious words we'd heard about living in America," his father had said. He'd gone to the frontier, looking for a way to make their lives better. Sadly, he hadn't been heard from since he left. In the meantime, Mother died. [Diseases from living in unsanitary quarters led to early deaths of overworked mothers. Orphanages were built to care for as many children as could possibly be taken in. Adults could pay for the care on a weekly or monthly basis but if the payments stopped, the child became a ward of the court and was "disposed" of as the social workers saw fit. They were alone now; all four of them. At least they had each other. But, they weren't the only ones without parents. Read the excerpts from letters dated... ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ [no date given] ".... This little child has suffered since she was born... My husband is dead and I have nobody to help me. ...Do not be afraid of the sores on its face; it is nothing but a ringworm. You'll remember this badge." [The mother was talking about a cloth ribbon from Ulysses S. Grant's re-election campaign which reads, "General Grant, our Next President"] ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ November 23, 1869 "....I inform you that I am the mother of the child left on Thanksgiving night between the hours of 8 and 9 o'clock without even a slip of paper to tell you the name of the child left in your care, my heart aches so much I cannot tell. ...Although I have been unfortunate, I am neither low nor degraded and am in hopes of one day of claiming my child. Her name is Jane ... born on 5 of October 1869 between the hours of 3 and 4 o'clock in the morning ... she had a piece of canton-flannel tied around her head and ...little red and white socks on her feet..." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ December 10, 1869 "... It has been happily saved from being murdered this morning by his unfortunate mother. She told me that she gives up all claims on it...." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ July 1870 "...my darling boy. ...He is just from the breast, he has been sick with his bowels, they have not been right for a long time. I have cried and worried over him so much that I think my milk hurt him. ...He is 4 weeks old. Will you please remember his given name and if he is adopted, request that they not change his name; so that at some future day, if that name should be asked for, you will be able to tell what became of him or where he is. ...and if in years to come if I could hear that he had a home and kind friends, I could die in peace. On the other hand, if I should never hear, it would haunt me till the day of my death...." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ December 1, 1875 "Alone and deserted, I need to put my little one with you for a time. I would willingly work and take care of her but no one will have me and her too. ...She is only 3 weeks old and I have not had her christened or anything." ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ [The above excerpts are from letters tucked into five leather-bound albums at the New York Foundling Hospital's headquarters titled simply, "Letters Left on Babies by Their Mothers."] February, 1853 He and his sisters had tried to make it on their own, but their tender ages were against them. The kindly neighbor who originally watched just the 3-year old had attempted to help them. There were just too many children needing too much help, and not enough money or resources. In the end, he and his sisters were turned out to the streets to fend for themselves. They had become "half-orphans" ~ with no parents, no other family to look after them, they lived on the streets, slept in doorways, and got by with whatever means necessary. They roamed in search of money, food and shelter ~ prey to disease and crime. They sold matches, rags, or newspapers to survive. For protection against street violence, they banded together with other street waifs and formed gangs. [They weren't completely alone, however. In 1850, when New York City's population was 500,000, an estimated 20,000 children were homeless and roaming the streets at that same time. Many were sons and daughters of immigrants. Police, faced with a growing problem, were known to arrest vagrant children ~ some as young as five ~ locking them up with adult criminals.] "Mother, Father... I love you and I miss you." Next Week: "Into the System" To you October babies - the cousins and I wish you a very happy and exciting year ahead. Happy Birthday! You are loved! Family ... it's what we're all about. I so enjoyed spending this time with you today. Thank you for sharing it with me. I wish each of you a week filled with health, productivity, fun, and above all, filled with love and inner peace. Happy All Hallows Eve, everyone! :) ) ( ) _.-~~-. (@\'--'/. Colleen ('``.__.'`) `..____.'

    10/27/2002 01:30:18