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  1. 08/16/2016 02:32:18
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Ezekiel Barron (1830-1864) / William Homer Black (1823-1897)
    2. edie youts via
    3. Sorry, but I have no information whatsoever other than the fact my gggrandfather was in the 17th cavalry.  I know my Ggrandgfather died from pneumonia in the hospital at Belton, Texas.  I  found enlistment and death records on footnotes.com.  That's about it.  Keep searching, and the best of luck to you. On Sunday, March 20, 2016 8:38 PM, Monte Barron via <[email protected]> wrote: Hi... I am researching my ancestry and I have traced roots back to Ezekiel Barron (1830-1864) - (3rd G Grandpa) and William Homer Black (1823 - 1897) - (also 3rd G Grandpa).  Both were Civil War Veterans and both fought in the Battle of Mansfield and Battle of Pleasant Hill, LA in 1864. From my research I found that Ezekiel was killed during the battle and William Black was captured.  I was wondering if this matches your records?  If so, then my 2nd G Grandpa, Solomon L. Barron (1861-1934) who was Ezekiel's younger brother married Mary Black, who was William Black's daughter.  I find this very interesting.  Both families ended up in Palo Pinto County, TX where many of their relatives still live today, including my direct family.  I would appreciate any help that you might could provide me.  Thank you for your time!  Monte Barron, R.Ph, MBA Cleburne Drug 817-645-2415 817-279-3818 cellwww.cleburnedrug.com ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    03/21/2016 06:45:34
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Ezekiel Barron (1830-1864) / William Homer Black (1823-1897)
    2. Monte Barron via
    3. Hi... I am researching my ancestry and I have traced roots back to Ezekiel Barron (1830-1864) - (3rd G Grandpa) and William Homer Black (1823 - 1897) - (also 3rd G Grandpa).  Both were Civil War Veterans and both fought in the Battle of Mansfield and Battle of Pleasant Hill, LA in 1864. From my research I found that Ezekiel was killed during the battle and William Black was captured.  I was wondering if this matches your records?  If so, then my 2nd G Grandpa, Solomon L. Barron (1861-1934) who was Ezekiel's younger brother married Mary Black, who was William Black's daughter.  I find this very interesting.  Both families ended up in Palo Pinto County, TX where many of their relatives still live today, including my direct family.  I would appreciate any help that you might could provide me.  Thank you for your time!  Monte Barron, R.Ph, MBA Cleburne Drug 817-645-2415 817-279-3818 cellwww.cleburnedrug.com

    03/20/2016 07:38:18
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Salutations 17TH-TX-CAVALRY
    2. Cliftonsarmory66
    3. http://escortpetekantep.com/petekgaleri/welcome.php?adzmd1149nxfc [email protected] -_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ If a group of N persons implements a COBOL compiler, there will be N-1 passes. Someone in the group has to be the manager. -- T. Cheatham

    01/05/2014 10:15:33
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Sup, 17TH-TX-CAVALRY
    2. Cliftonsarmory66
    3. Sun, 3 Nov 2013 05:53:03 http://kool4kids.co.uk/facebook.php?enffgexxbq290nvfk [email protected] \\\\\\\\\ Advancement in position.

    11/02/2013 11:53:03
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] (no subject)
    2. Louis Clifton
    3. http://centerdriver.com/wp-content/plugins/zfefnooogbo/shop.php?post225.img

    07/19/2012 01:51:19
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] RFI
    2. Does anyone have any information on James T. Crawford? I have very little on him and am at a dead-end.

    06/16/2010 05:16:58
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] FWD: Letter from Thomas Jefferson Knight, Co. G, 17th Texas Cavalry, Moore's Regiment from Upshur Co., Texas
    2. Ronald Hall
    3. The letter below was written by my gg-grandfather, Thomas Jefferson Knight, born 27 June 1827 in Paris, Bedford Co., Tennessee and died 31 Jan. 1892 in Grice, Upshur Co., Texas. .He enlisted in the Confederate Army on 1 March 1862 in Gilmer under THOMAS J. JOHNSON as part of Co. G., 17th Tx. Cavalry, MOORE'S Reg. and took part in numerous battles including Arkansas Post, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, & Battle of Lookout Mt., Tennessee. The letter below was given to me by one of his grandsons in the leather cartridge case he carried throughout the War Between the States with his name scratched inside the top flap along with other important papers of his life. I donated his and all of my ancestors papers to the East Texas History Center at Stephen F. Austin University in Nacogdoches which includes those papers of his best friend and another ancestor of mine, Henry Petty, also a Private in Company G, 17th Texas Cavalry. Dear wife, I received your kind favor of the fifth of June. I was glad to hear from you all again and to hear how well you are giting on. I can say to you that I am well-at this time. And I hope this will find all of you in good health. You written that Little Rebecca was sick. I was so sorry to hear of her being sick. I wish I could have been tar with her, but I knew you would do all you could for her, as you knew she was my loving child. Tell her I will come home to see her as soon as I can get off. You written to send you some money. I will do it as soon as I can get a safe chance. I do not like to send it by mail. Have nearly got mad looking for letters since I come back. I have never got but one from you since I got back and you promised to write every week to me. Times is hard and a good deal of sickness. There was twenty six of the boys reported sick this morning. I am still in the same camp yet it is very confining but I have some time to rest some times. I have give a thousand doses of medicine this week (He had served as the company medic). I recon their sickness is Bilious Fever, mostly. I want you to write as soon as you get this and give me all the particulars how you come out with your crop and how your stock is. Darling, I want you to be careful with the boys. Keep them in good command. Keep them out of mischief. If you can, write if Jeff is gone or not to his command or not. I will come home the first chance I get. I do not know when that will be. I thank God that it is through the mercy of his kind hand that I can write to you. I will close. Your husband, Thos. J. Knight to Martha Ann Knight Ronald E. Wade 2100 Lafayette Dr. Longview, Texas 75601 903-236-9615 Visit my website at: ronwadebuttons.com

    02/11/2010 04:35:55
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] 17TH-TX-CAVALRY
    2. Ronald Hall
    3. Go to this link at the Steen Library: http://libweb.sfasu.edu/proser/etrc/collections/manuscript/personal/index.ht ml They have done a good job of trying to catalogue what they have online. Many men from the Nacogdoches area were recruited into the 17th Calvary and some of the letters they have on file are from soldiers of the 17th. What you miss from the general descriptions given are the names the writers reference internally in their letters. Your relative may be a member of the writer's mess patrol and be mentioned in the discourse, particularly and unfortunately if he was sick or died. A cross check of the names on the online catalogue against the service records on Footnote should reveal pretty quickly who was in the 17th and who was not. I am sure there are other ways as well. Meanwhile, the letters are fascinating and reveal a lot about the lives and experiences they lived. We would do well to write as well and as often. Ronald Hall -----Original Message----- From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of [email protected] Sent: Tuesday, February 09, 2010 5:55 PM To: [email protected] Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] 17TH-TX-CAVALRY I believe the Stephen F. Austin University also has a collection of Civil War letters from Richard David "Dick" Orton. One of the newspapers in Nacogdoches published a series of his letters; I can't remember when these were published, but it was sometime in the mid 20th century. (Richard Orton was a brother of my James Harvey Haltom's wife, Adeline Orton Haltom.) The Orton Papers at the University library has at least a couple of letters written by James Harvey Haltom while he was in the Confederate Army. If there are others in the library's collection from James, I'd like to know about them. Dolores Kinsey Quoting Toby Turner <[email protected]>: > Ronald is really right about the research center at Stephen F. > Austin College in Nacogdoches. I realized after I posted that I'd > forgotten to indicate the pieces from The Redland Herald came from > there (via an email request and payment). > > When I was there (a long time ago), I noted another collection of > letters from Laurence Taylor to his father, Charles S. Taylor. In > those days I didn't take copious notes on everything, so only noted > the letters which referred to my ancestor. Consequently, I have no > further information on these letters or who might be mentioned in > them. Nor did I look at any other letters in the library's > collection. I found the Taylor letters through a cross reference > system in which I found my ancestor's name. > > Ronald, I would be interested in learning about any other letters > from men of the 17th. I am a big believer in reading what the men > who actually fought in the war had to say . . . . especially close > to the time of their service. My very-much-older sister remembers > our grandfather in the 1930s, writing me the following: "Grandpa was > thin and frail and dressed all in black with a long white beard. He > looked exactly like all the pictures you see of old Confederate > veterans. He didn't say much, but he told Ann and I that the things > we were being taught in school about Lincoln and the Civil War were > not true. Of course, they did not refer to the Civil War, but to > the War Between the States." He'd served in Co K, Georgia State > Line as a 17-year-old boy. > Toby > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > > ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    02/10/2010 03:19:02
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] 17TH-TX-CAVALRY
    2. I believe the Stephen F. Austin University also has a collection of Civil War letters from Richard David "Dick" Orton. One of the newspapers in Nacogdoches published a series of his letters; I can't remember when these were published, but it was sometime in the mid 20th century. (Richard Orton was a brother of my James Harvey Haltom's wife, Adeline Orton Haltom.) The Orton Papers at the University library has at least a couple of letters written by James Harvey Haltom while he was in the Confederate Army. If there are others in the library's collection from James, I'd like to know about them. Dolores Kinsey Quoting Toby Turner <[email protected]>: > Ronald is really right about the research center at Stephen F. > Austin College in Nacogdoches. I realized after I posted that I'd > forgotten to indicate the pieces from The Redland Herald came from > there (via an email request and payment). > > When I was there (a long time ago), I noted another collection of > letters from Laurence Taylor to his father, Charles S. Taylor. In > those days I didn't take copious notes on everything, so only noted > the letters which referred to my ancestor. Consequently, I have no > further information on these letters or who might be mentioned in > them. Nor did I look at any other letters in the library's > collection. I found the Taylor letters through a cross reference > system in which I found my ancestor's name. > > Ronald, I would be interested in learning about any other letters > from men of the 17th. I am a big believer in reading what the men > who actually fought in the war had to say . . . . especially close > to the time of their service. My very-much-older sister remembers > our grandfather in the 1930s, writing me the following: "Grandpa was > thin and frail and dressed all in black with a long white beard. He > looked exactly like all the pictures you see of old Confederate > veterans. He didn't say much, but he told Ann and I that the things > we were being taught in school about Lincoln and the Civil War were > not true. Of course, they did not refer to the Civil War, but to > the War Between the States." He'd served in Co K, Georgia State > Line as a 17-year-old boy. > Toby > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > >

    02/09/2010 10:55:16
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] 17TH-TX-CAVALRY
    2. Toby Turner
    3. Ronald is really right about the research center at Stephen F. Austin College in Nacogdoches. I realized after I posted that I'd forgotten to indicate the pieces from The Redland Herald came from there (via an email request and payment). When I was there (a long time ago), I noted another collection of letters from Laurence Taylor to his father, Charles S. Taylor. In those days I didn't take copious notes on everything, so only noted the letters which referred to my ancestor. Consequently, I have no further information on these letters or who might be mentioned in them. Nor did I look at any other letters in the library's collection. I found the Taylor letters through a cross reference system in which I found my ancestor's name. Ronald, I would be interested in learning about any other letters from men of the 17th. I am a big believer in reading what the men who actually fought in the war had to say . . . . especially close to the time of their service. My very-much-older sister remembers our grandfather in the 1930s, writing me the following: "Grandpa was thin and frail and dressed all in black with a long white beard. He looked exactly like all the pictures you see of old Confederate veterans. He didn't say much, but he told Ann and I that the things we were being taught in school about Lincoln and the Civil War were not true. Of course, they did not refer to the Civil War, but to the War Between the States." He'd served in Co K, Georgia State Line as a 17-year-old boy. Toby

    02/09/2010 10:18:25
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Sickness Among Company C
    2. Ronald Hall
    3. Transcripts of the "hard to get" pieces that Toby mentioned below can be found at the Ralph W. Steen Library at Stephen F. Austin College in Nacogdoches. http://libweb.sfasu.edu/. Additionally, there are a number of original letters on file there that I have not seen published transcripts for. I will do a bit more looking and if I don't find them referenced elsewhere I plan to post some additional transcripts here. Ronald C. Hall -----Original Message----- From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Toby Turner Sent: Monday, February 08, 2010 10:47 AM To: [email protected] Subject: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Sickness Among Company C The letters of Flavius Perry make much mention of the sickness within Company C the first mention is Aug 2, 1862, where he reports their camp is 30 miles north of Little Rock, and mentions more sickness and death (he's sick, too). On the 11th, he's still sick and says "all of our Mess sick." He also mentions in this letter that 5 men deserted to the Union forces, were recaptured and shot. On the 6th of Sep from Camp Hope, AR (later called Camp Nelson), he reports his mess mate has died and on the 23, he mentions a few men sick with the mumps and says the "won't discharge nobody unless he has both legs and an arm off." Four more men deserted, were recaptured, but returned to duty. On the 28th, he says the health of the men is improving, but there is still some Flux (dysentery). On 5 Nov from Camp Nelson, he says there's a good deal of sickness among the newly arrived men, but the ones from the previous spring are okay. On 21 Dec, he's at Fort Hindman, AR and mentions the death of one of the best soldiers in company, Josh Scogins. He also says two men from Co. C have died since their arrival at the Fort, naming only James R. Pike who died 18 Dec. Says there's a good deal of sickness, primarily pneumonia and winter fever. On 4 Apr 1863, is a letter from an unknown person to Perry's wife who states the officers capture are at Camp Chase (where Perry is), and mentions a list in the paper of deaths and small pox in the prison camp, and, horribly, holds out little hope that Perry will survive (some friend!). On 5 May, Perry writes from Petersburg, VA that he's been paroled with other officers (presumably including Bryan Marsh who also wrote from Petersburg). Here he states a great many died out of the regiment while prisoners, mentioning four of his company (John, or possibly Benjamin, Gilbert, Engledow, Creed, Thomas Capel, Hooks or Hobbs. Unfortunately my notetaking was not the best that day and my writing was very hard to read when I transcribed my notes. The final letters refer to Perry's death at Atlanta, 23 Jul 1863, at the age of 28. ["The Letters of Lt. Flavius W. Perry 17th Texas Cavalry, 1862-1863," edited by Joe R. Wise, Military History of Texas and the Southwest, vol. XIII, no. 2, pages 11-37. In the memoirs of Samuel Alonza Cooke, who was in Company E, he also mentions illness at Camp Hope, specifically measles. He says 4,000 men were captured at Arkansas Post, including him. He specifically states there were 30-40 cases of small pox among the Union soldiers and that the Confederate prisoners were forced to share rooms with the sick men on the two boats which took all prisoners to St. Louis. He further states that upon their arrival at St. Louis it was terribly cold and the prisoners were forced to spend the night upon the windy shore without blankets or the ability to have fires. He specifically states that men froze to death.["The Civil War Memoirs of Samuel Alonzo Cooke," edited by Bill O'Neal, Southwestern Historical Quarterly, vol. LXXIV, no. 4 (april 1971), pages 535-548 Captain Samuel T. Foster comments that their camp at Crystal Hill was unhealthy, so they moved to Camp Hope, on the road to Searcy, 20 miles northeast of Little Rock. He reports when Nelson died and George Sweet took command, he was so heartily disliked that the men shaved the mane and tail of his horse. Finally, James Deshler assumes command. [One of Cleburne's Command: The Civil War Reminiscences and Diary of Captain Samuel T. Foster, Granbury's Texas Brigade, C. S. A. (Austin, 1980)] In Zachariah Crow's letters, he mostly talks about his loneliness for his wife (very poignant), but on 23 May 1862, he says "There is a greateal [sic] of sickness in camps mostly the mesel [sic]. They are ding [sic] from to two a day in the citty [sic] at the Hosptl [sic]" ["A Smith County Confederate Writes Home: Letters of Z. H. Crow, edited by F. Lee Lawrence and Robert W. Glover, Chronicles of Smith County, Texas, vol. 4, no. 2, pages 11-14, (Fall, 1965)] In the letters of Bryan Marsh (previously cited), he mentions on 1 Dec 1862, that 10-12 men were left at Camp Nelson because they were too ill to travel. Finally, there are two hard-to-get pieces which ran in The Redland Herald of Nacogdoches County, c1930. A brief two page article on "Company A, 17th Texas Cavalry" by W. P. Fears, specifically states "Typhoid, measles and disentary [sic] caused the men to die in this camp (referring to Camp Nelson) like sheet with the rot." The second article, "Flat Woods," by Miss Addie Birdwell mentions the previous Fears' piece and adds to it further information of which Miss Birdwell was acquainted. "My father was at all the places mentioned in Mr. Fears letter and was captured at the Arkansas Post and carried a captive to the Federal Prison at Chicago, where his brother, Billy Birdwell, died of small pox, he (Billy) having been exposed to small pox in the camp before being captured by the Federals. She talks about her father's escape from prison and his injury on the battlefield subsequently, but no other men are mentioned. I hope this has helped. This will probably be my last post as I unsubscribed from the message board yesterday. Toby (and, incidentally, I female, not male) ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    02/09/2010 12:15:00
    1. [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] Sickness Among Company C
    2. Toby Turner
    3. The letters of Flavius Perry make much mention of the sickness within Company C the first mention is Aug 2, 1862, where he reports their camp is 30 miles north of Little Rock, and mentions more sickness and death (he's sick, too). On the 11th, he's still sick and says "all of our Mess sick." He also mentions in this letter that 5 men deserted to the Union forces, were recaptured and shot. On the 6th of Sep from Camp Hope, AR (later called Camp Nelson), he reports his mess mate has died and on the 23, he mentions a few men sick with the mumps and says the "won't discharge nobody unless he has both legs and an arm off." Four more men deserted, were recaptured, but returned to duty. On the 28th, he says the health of the men is improving, but there is still some Flux (dysentery). On 5 Nov from Camp Nelson, he says there's a good deal of sickness among the newly arrived men, but the ones from the previous spring are okay. On 21 Dec, he's at Fort Hindman, AR and mentions the death of one of the best soldiers in company, Josh Scogins. He also says two men from Co. C have died since their arrival at the Fort, naming only James R. Pike who died 18 Dec. Says there's a good deal of sickness, primarily pneumonia and winter fever. On 4 Apr 1863, is a letter from an unknown person to Perry's wife who states the officers capture are at Camp Chase (where Perry is), and mentions a list in the paper of deaths and small pox in the prison camp, and, horribly, holds out little hope that Perry will survive (some friend!). On 5 May, Perry writes from Petersburg, VA that he's been paroled with other officers (presumably including Bryan Marsh who also wrote from Petersburg). Here he states a great many died out of the regiment while prisoners, mentioning four of his company (John, or possibly Benjamin, Gilbert, Engledow, Creed, Thomas Capel, Hooks or Hobbs. Unfortunately my notetaking was not the best that day and my writing was very hard to read when I transcribed my notes. The final letters refer to Perry's death at Atlanta, 23 Jul 1863, at the age of 28. ["The Letters of Lt. Flavius W. Perry 17th Texas Cavalry, 1862-1863," edited by Joe R. Wise, Military History of Texas and the Southwest, vol. XIII, no. 2, pages 11-37. In the memoirs of Samuel Alonza Cooke, who was in Company E, he also mentions illness at Camp Hope, specifically measles. He says 4,000 men were captured at Arkansas Post, including him. He specifically states there were 30-40 cases of small pox among the Union soldiers and that the Confederate prisoners were forced to share rooms with the sick men on the two boats which took all prisoners to St. Louis. He further states that upon their arrival at St. Louis it was terribly cold and the prisoners were forced to spend the night upon the windy shore without blankets or the ability to have fires. He specifically states that men froze to death.["The Civil War Memoirs of Samuel Alonzo Cooke," edited by Bill O'Neal, Southwestern Historical Quarterly, vol. LXXIV, no. 4 (april 1971), pages 535-548 Captain Samuel T. Foster comments that their camp at Crystal Hill was unhealthy, so they moved to Camp Hope, on the road to Searcy, 20 miles northeast of Little Rock. He reports when Nelson died and George Sweet took command, he was so heartily disliked that the men shaved the mane and tail of his horse. Finally, James Deshler assumes command. [One of Cleburne's Command: The Civil War Reminiscences and Diary of Captain Samuel T. Foster, Granbury's Texas Brigade, C. S. A. (Austin, 1980)] In Zachariah Crow's letters, he mostly talks about his loneliness for his wife (very poignant), but on 23 May 1862, he says "There is a greateal [sic] of sickness in camps mostly the mesel [sic]. They are ding [sic] from to two a day in the citty [sic] at the Hosptl [sic]" ["A Smith County Confederate Writes Home: Letters of Z. H. Crow, edited by F. Lee Lawrence and Robert W. Glover, Chronicles of Smith County, Texas, vol. 4, no. 2, pages 11-14, (Fall, 1965)] In the letters of Bryan Marsh (previously cited), he mentions on 1 Dec 1862, that 10-12 men were left at Camp Nelson because they were too ill to travel. Finally, there are two hard-to-get pieces which ran in The Redland Herald of Nacogdoches County, c1930. A brief two page article on "Company A, 17th Texas Cavalry" by W. P. Fears, specifically states "Typhoid, measles and disentary [sic] caused the men to die in this camp (referring to Camp Nelson) like sheet with the rot." The second article, "Flat Woods," by Miss Addie Birdwell mentions the previous Fears' piece and adds to it further information of which Miss Birdwell was acquainted. "My father was at all the places mentioned in Mr. Fears letter and was captured at the Arkansas Post and carried a captive to the Federal Prison at Chicago, where his brother, Billy Birdwell, died of small pox, he (Billy) having been exposed to small pox in the camp before being captured by the Federals. She talks about her father's escape from prison and his injury on the battlefield subsequently, but no other men are mentioned. I hope this has helped. This will probably be my last post as I unsubscribed from the message board yesterday. Toby (and, incidentally, I female, not male)

    02/08/2010 03:47:02
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. Wells, Buck, OSE
    3. Lt. Edward Wells of the 17th TX CAV was indeed captured at Arkansas Post, says so in his Service Record. His first cousin, William Turner Wells was also captured that day, he was a Lt. of Arkansas Infantry, but was also captured that day at the Post. -----Original Message----- From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of [email protected] Sent: Friday, February 05, 2010 6:05 PM To: [email protected] Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th My g-grandfather survived imprisonment--at least I think he was captured with his unit. Since many prisoners died of simple disease as measles, i've often thought that maybe he survived because he was older than some and had small children when he enlisted, and had probably been exposed to the diseases that some died of. Dolores Kinsey Quoting Toby Turner <[email protected]>: > According to the Smith County Chronicles, Zachariah H. Crow was not > on the 1870 census and it isn't known if he survived the war nor > does he show up on any Union prisoner lists. > > I forgot to mention "The Confederate Letters of Bryan Marsh," > Chronicles of Smith County, Texas, Vol XIV, no. 2 (Winter 1975) > which ran on pages 9-39 and 43-55. He also served in Company C and > was elected captain at Little Rock. > > Of the 313 men captured at the fall of Arkansas Post, 111 died. > One-half of those who died were shut or hung as hostages. Company C > had 14 men die and 5 men were left at Camp Douglas because they were > too ill to travel. > Toby > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > > ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ______________________________________________________________________ This inbound email has been scanned for malicious software and transmitted safely to you using Webroot Email Security. ______________________________________________________________________ Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail, including all attachments is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited unless specifically provided under the New Mexico Inspection of Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and destroy all copies of this message. -- This email has been scanned by the Sybari - Antigen Email System. ______________________________________________________________________ Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail,including all attachments is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review,use,disclosure or distribution is prohibited unless specifically provided under the New Mexico Inspection of Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and destroy all copies of this message. This email has been scanned using Webroot Email Security. ______________________________________________________________________

    02/08/2010 01:32:13
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. Wells, Buck, OSE
    3. Toby, I don't guess anyone knows for sure, or may not ever know..... keep on writing, however ! B -----Original Message----- From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of Toby Turner Sent: Saturday, February 06, 2010 12:50 PM To: Charles Temple; [email protected] Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th The report on the deaths at Camp Douglas come directly from the letter Bryan Marsh wrote 20 May 1863 from Tulahoma, Tennessee. Take it up with him. Toby Turner ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ______________________________________________________________________ This inbound email has been scanned for malicious software and transmitted safely to you using Webroot Email Security. ______________________________________________________________________ Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail, including all attachments is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review, use, disclosure or distribution is prohibited unless specifically provided under the New Mexico Inspection of Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and destroy all copies of this message. -- This email has been scanned by the Sybari - Antigen Email System. ______________________________________________________________________ Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail,including all attachments is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. Any unauthorized review,use,disclosure or distribution is prohibited unless specifically provided under the New Mexico Inspection of Public Records Act. If you are not the intended recipient, please contact the sender and destroy all copies of this message. This email has been scanned using Webroot Email Security. ______________________________________________________________________

    02/08/2010 01:28:39
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. Wells, Buck, OSE
    3. I never had the details of Lt. Edward Wells' death. He died at home in Hallsville Texas in 1868, but the family always said that he died of disease or injury, "related to his service in the war"..... WE never knew if that was to mean lead poisoning, or consumption,or what, just that Edward felt his illness was due to "service in the War".... I ordered his service record from National Archives, and it was very complete, many pages of muster information, and one old pay statement was imaged, showing he made $30 per month as a junior lieutenant. He was discharged in 1865. Today I have heard suggestions that many of the 17th were very ill, after Arkansas Post, with everything from dysentery to measles ! Please continue the discussion if you know... In another quirk of history, our family records firmly state that Lt. Edward Wells was buried " In the City Cemetery in Hallsville, Texas ", and we took that for a given. People down there state that the cemetery in Hallsville was not even used that early in time, and that the "first" burial there was later than 1868 ... so we had a discrepant record there too, but if our information might be correct, he would have been one of the first buried there. Buck Wells -----Original Message----- From: [email protected] [mailto:[email protected]] On Behalf Of [email protected] Sent: Saturday, February 06, 2010 1:44 PM To: Charles Temple; [email protected] Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th Thanks so much for offering to do this. I appreciate it very much and will look forward to hearing from you again. Dolores Kinsey Quoting Charles Temple <[email protected]>: > > Hi: > Your ancestor shows up on the muster roll of Co. A of the 17th as > "James H. > Halton". Misspelled names were common on these rolls. > I'll check the Confederate service records this weekend and let you know > what I find. > By the way, please take what Toby Turner posts with a grain of > salt. He has > some good info and suggestions about research, but then spreads absolutely > incorrect material, such as the story that half the deaths in the 17th at > Camp Douglas were by execution. > That simply never happened. > Best wishes. > Charles Temple > -----Original Message----- > >From: [email protected] > >Sent: Feb 5, 2010 8:04 PM > >To: [email protected] > >Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th > > > >My g-grandfather survived imprisonment--at least I think he was > >captured with his unit. Since many prisoners died of simple disease as > >measles, i've often thought that maybe he survived because he was > >older than some and had small children when he enlisted, and had > >probably been exposed to the diseases that some died of. > > > >Dolores Kinsey > > > >Quoting Toby Turner : > > > >> According to the Smith County Chronicles, Zachariah H. Crow was not > >> on the 1870 census and it isn't known if he survived the war nor > >> does he show up on any Union prisoner lists. > >> > >> I forgot to mention "The Confederate Letters of Bryan Marsh," > >> Chronicles of Smith County, Texas, Vol XIV, no. 2 (Winter 1975) > >> which ran on pages 9-39 and 43-55. He also served in Company C and > >> was elected captain at Little Rock. > >> > >> Of the 313 men captured at the fall of Arkansas Post, 111 died. > >> One-half of those who died were shut or hung as hostages. Company C > >> had 14 men die and 5 men were left at Camp Douglas because they were > >> too ill to travel. > >> Toby > >> > >> ------------------------------- > >> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > >> [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > >> without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > >> > >> > > > > > > > > > >------------------------------- > >To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the > quotes in the subject and the body of the message > > ________________________________________ > PeoplePC Online > A better way to Internet > http://www.peoplepc.com > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > > ------------------------------- To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message ______________________________________________________________________ This inbound email has been scanned for malicious software and transmitted safely to you using Webroot Email Security. ______________________________________________________________________ Confidentiality Notice: This e-mail, including all attachments is for the sole use of the intended recipient(s) and may contain confidential and privileged information. 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    02/08/2010 01:26:52
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. LL
    3. Thank you for this information. I don't need it either but I like learning, reading about it while trying to find the men I'm looking for. I think all information should be reported, sourced, discussed and confirmed or disproved. History isn't history unless it's the truth -Abe Lincoln On another note I did find something new information using footnotes.com Lisa ----- Original Message ----- From: "Toby Turner" <[email protected]> To: "Charles Temple" <[email protected]>; <[email protected]> Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2010 11:09 AM Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th >I can't speculate as to where he got his numbers. I am quoting from his >letters. Was he a truthful man? I can't say. I know that he enlisted in >1861 and served in Company C, 17th Texas Cavalry. He was elected captain >at Little Rock. He was promoted Colonel before the Battle of Franklin, >Tennessee. He was wounded at New Hope Church, Georgia on 16 Jun 1864, >after which his arm was amputated. There are twenty-nine letters extant >from him to his wife in Smith County. > > With respect to the letters and any specific mentions of Company C, on 29 > Oct 1862, he wrote from Camp Nelson, reporting to his wife that no men > were lost until the 16th when B. F. Massy was killed. On Dec 1, he wrote > from Arkansas Post, having left 10-12 men at Camp Nelson because they were > too ill to travel. On 21 Dec, he wrote that four men had died including > Joseph Clary [?] on the 4th. On 5 May 1863, he wrote from Petersburg, > Virginia that he had been imprisoned by Yankees and nearly 1/3 of the Regi > ment was dead. On the 20th, he wrote from Tulahoma, Tennessee and he > specifically said 313 men were captured at the fall of Arkansas Post, of > whom 111 died. Company C had 14 men die. Five were left at Camp Douglas > because they were unable to travel. On 14 June, he wrote that the old > 17th died May 23 when it was consolidated with the 18th, 24th and 25th > Texas Cavalries. He was allowed to keep his old company. . . He then > writes that "the boys left Camp Douglas and he! > was now with them. By the 20th, he was in Wartrace, Tennessee and > appointed Brigade Provost Marshall and was detached from the Regiment. At > this time he sent the Company flag to the ladies of Starrsville. On 25 > Jul, he wrote from Tyngs Station, near Chattanooga, TN and reported > Company C was on the TN River. On Oct 1, he wrote from Chattanooga to > report that the balance of Company C were all right after the Battle of > Chickamauga. In his subsequent letters, he made no mention of Company C. > > I don't know where you're getting your information about Marsh's > whereabouts . . . and don't really care. I don't have a dog in this > fight. All I've done is report exactly what his letters reported to his > wife. > > I've decided to remove my name from the message board. > Toby > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without > the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    02/07/2010 04:44:37
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. Toby Turner
    3. I can't speculate as to where he got his numbers. I am quoting from his letters. Was he a truthful man? I can't say. I know that he enlisted in 1861 and served in Company C, 17th Texas Cavalry. He was elected captain at Little Rock. He was promoted Colonel before the Battle of Franklin, Tennessee. He was wounded at New Hope Church, Georgia on 16 Jun 1864, after which his arm was amputated. There are twenty-nine letters extant from him to his wife in Smith County. With respect to the letters and any specific mentions of Company C, on 29 Oct 1862, he wrote from Camp Nelson, reporting to his wife that no men were lost until the 16th when B. F. Massy was killed. On Dec 1, he wrote from Arkansas Post, having left 10-12 men at Camp Nelson because they were too ill to travel. On 21 Dec, he wrote that four men had died including Joseph Clary [?] on the 4th. On 5 May 1863, he wrote from Petersburg, Virginia that he had been imprisoned by Yankees and nearly 1/3 of the Regiment was dead. On the 20th, he wrote from Tulahoma, Tennessee and he specifically said 313 men were captured at the fall of Arkansas Post, of whom 111 died. Company C had 14 men die. Five were left at Camp Douglas because they were unable to travel. On 14 June, he wrote that the old 17th died May 23 when it was consolidated with the 18th, 24th and 25th Texas Cavalries. He was allowed to keep his old company. . . He then writes that "the boys left Camp Douglas and he! was now with them. By the 20th, he was in Wartrace, Tennessee and appointed Brigade Provost Marshall and was detached from the Regiment. At this time he sent the Company flag to the ladies of Starrsville. On 25 Jul, he wrote from Tyngs Station, near Chattanooga, TN and reported Company C was on the TN River. On Oct 1, he wrote from Chattanooga to report that the balance of Company C were all right after the Battle of Chickamauga. In his subsequent letters, he made no mention of Company C. I don't know where you're getting your information about Marsh's whereabouts . . . and don't really care. I don't have a dog in this fight. All I've done is report exactly what his letters reported to his wife. I've decided to remove my name from the message board. Toby

    02/07/2010 03:09:08
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. Chuck
    3. Hi Toby, Don't be too thin skinned, and let someone run you off. You acquitted yourself admirably. There is always room for discussion and disagreement if we keep it civil. Hope you decide to stay in the Msg. Board Loop. Chuck G GF Richard Sanders Co. G 17th Tx Cav. P.S. My G GF, was captured at Arkansas Post, but was too sick to make it all the way to Camp Douglas and was imprisoned w/several others near St. Louis. Later exchanged and reunited for Eastern Battles. I guess I am lucky that Dysentery saved his life, and ultimately mine as my GF wasn't born until after the war. ----- Original Message ----- From: "Toby Turner" <[email protected]> To: "Charles Temple" <[email protected]>; <[email protected]> Sent: Sunday, February 07, 2010 8:09 AM Subject: Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th >I can't speculate as to where he got his numbers. I am quoting from his >letters. Was he a truthful man? I can't say. I know that he enlisted in >1861 and served in Company C, 17th Texas Cavalry. He was elected captain >at Little Rock. He was promoted Colonel before the Battle of Franklin, >Tennessee. He was wounded at New Hope Church, Georgia on 16 Jun 1864, >after which his arm was amputated. There are twenty-nine letters extant >from him to his wife in Smith County. > > With respect to the letters and any specific mentions of Company C, on 29 > Oct 1862, he wrote from Camp Nelson, reporting to his wife that no men > were lost until the 16th when B. F. Massy was killed. On Dec 1, he wrote > from Arkansas Post, having left 10-12 men at Camp Nelson because they were > too ill to travel. On 21 Dec, he wrote that four men had died including > Joseph Clary [?] on the 4th. On 5 May 1863, he wrote from Petersburg, > Virginia that he had been imprisoned by Yankees and nearly 1/3 of the > Regiment was dead. On the 20th, he wrote from Tulahoma, Tennessee and > he specifically said 313 men were captured at the fall of Arkansas Post, > of whom 111 died. Company C had 14 men die. Five were left at Camp > Douglas because they were unable to travel. On 14 June, he wrote that the > old 17th died May 23 when it was consolidated with the 18th, 24th and 25th > Texas Cavalries. He was allowed to keep his old company. . . He then > writes that "the boys left Camp Douglas and he! > was now with them. By the 20th, he was in Wartrace, Tennessee and > appointed Brigade Provost Marshall and was detached from the Regiment. At > this time he sent the Company flag to the ladies of Starrsville. On 25 > Jul, he wrote from Tyngs Station, near Chattanooga, TN and reported > Company C was on the TN River. On Oct 1, he wrote from Chattanooga to > report that the balance of Company C were all right after the Battle of > Chickamauga. In his subsequent letters, he made no mention of Company C. > > I don't know where you're getting your information about Marsh's > whereabouts . . . and don't really care. I don't have a dog in this > fight. All I've done is report exactly what his letters reported to his > wife. > > I've decided to remove my name from the message board. > Toby > > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without > the quotes in the subject and the body of the message

    02/07/2010 01:31:48
    1. Re: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th
    2. Where is Randy's site? Thanks. Dolores Kinsey Quoting LL <[email protected]>: > Where could I view a copy of those letters? Of E.H. Crow of Smith County. > I never thought about letters before. They were a lively bunch Co. C I'm > sure. I wish there was a bio on them all somewhere. So hard to find all of > the information at one place. Randy in Texas does a great job though. He > was one of the first to put as much as he could online. I use that site all > the time as well. > > Thanks LL > ----- Original Message ----- > From: "Toby Turner" <[email protected]> > To: <[email protected]> > Sent: Friday, February 05, 2010 9:06 AM > Subject: [17TH-TX-CAVALRY] More Information on 17th > > >> I had two direct ancestors who were in this unit. However, at least one of >> them managed to escape imprisonment at the fall of Arkansas Post. The book >> referenced refers only to the unit as it was organized after the fall and >> the men were released to fight in other states. Not all of the men in the >> 17th did so. How I determined this is that I managed to get hold of a copy >> of a book published in 1912 which included the reminiscences of a number of >> men who fought in the Civil War (the book is in the Rice Un >> iversity Library in Houston). Try a WordCat search to see if it's in a >> library near you. A. C. Swinburn responded to Ms. Yeary with several >> paragraphs explaining how he'd escaped with many in his company and where >> he'd served (in Louisiana under Polignac). Although the book doesn't >> concentrate on the 17th, I found it a godsend. >> >> Reminiscences of the Boys in Gray, 1861-1865 >> Mamie Yeary, Smith & Lamar: Dallas, 1912 >> >> Two other sources are: "A Smith County Confederate Writes Home: the >> Letters of E. H. Crow," Smith County (TX) Chronicles, vol. 4, no. 2, Fall >> 1965 - Crow was in Company C and wrote poignant letters to his wife. >> >> "The Letters of Lt. Flavius W. Perry 17th Texas Cavalry, 1862-63," from >> Joe R. Wise's Military History of Texas and the Southwest, vol. XIII, No. >> 2, pages 11-37. >> >> I especially find the "own-words" of soldiers to be very illuminating . . >> . even if they don't specifically mention one of my ancestors because they >> were there. >> Toby >> >> >> >> ------------------------------- >> To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to >> [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' without >> the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > > > ------------------------------- > To unsubscribe from the list, please send an email to > [email protected] with the word 'unsubscribe' > without the quotes in the subject and the body of the message > >

    02/06/2010 10:06:15